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Newly discovered 6m-year-old Cretan footprints stolen

There has been a lot of interest in our discovery of nearly-6m-year-old footprints on Crete, first reported by the The Conversation – suggesting that human ancestors could have roamed Europe at the same time as they were evolving in East Africa. The post Newly discovered 6m-year-old Cretan footprints stolen appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

An idea abandoned by its father

Italian wall lizard (Podarcis sicula) (Credit: Charles J. Sharp). Five mating pairs were taken from one island to another, and over the next thirty generations the transplanted population became remarkably different from the parent population. Show More Summary

Dawn of agriculture linked with poor start to life in ancient Atacama, Chile

Learning to cultivate crops and other agricultural food – rather than relying on hunter-gathering – is often thought of as a key milestone in the history of humanity. The post Dawn of agriculture linked with poor start to life in ancient Atacama, Chile appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Sexual orientation from facial images

This is hardly surprising, as there is an obvious evolutionary advantage for people being able to "read faces" not only for sexuality but also for various cognitive, moral, and personality traits (see, e.g., heroes and villains, wizards...Show More Summary

When ancient fossil DNA isn’t available, ancient glycans may help trace human evolution

Ancient DNA recovered from fossils is a valuable tool to study evolution and anthropology. Yet ancient fossil DNA from earlier geological ages has not been found yet in any part of Africa, where it's destroyed by extreme heat and humidity. The...Show More Summary

Why your ancestors would have aced the long jump

 A 52-million-year-old ankle fossil suggests our prehuman ancestors were high-flying acrobats. The post Why your ancestors would have aced the long jump appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Historic Monuments and the Fredericksburg, VA Slave Block

In Fredericksburg, Virgina, on the corner of William and Charles, sits a concrete (or is it limestone?) cylinder. Perhaps less than 2 feet tall, maybe [...] The post Historic Monuments and the Fredericksburg, VA Slave Block appeared first on Archaeology Review.

Stalagmite reveals age of Yucatán cave skeleton

A prehistoric human skeleton found on the Yucatán Peninsula is at least 13,000 years old and most likely dates from a glacial period at the end of the most recent ice age, the late Pleistocene. The post Stalagmite reveals age of Yucatán cave skeleton appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

The Solar Eclipse and Archaeology

On August 21, 2017 there will be a total eclipse of the sun by the moon. Something that is getting a lot of hype as [...] The post The Solar Eclipse and Archaeology appeared first on Archaeology Review.

Arrival of modern humans in Southeast Asia questioned

Humans may have exited out of Africa and arrived in Southeast Asia 20,000 years earlier than previously thought, a new study involving University of Queensland researchers suggests. The post Arrival of modern humans in Southeast Asia questioned appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Ancient pottery reveals insights on Iroquoian population’s power in 16th century

An innovative study published today in the journal Science Advances demonstrates how decorations on ancient pottery can be used to discover new evidence for how groups interacted across large regions. The post Ancient pottery reveals insights on Iroquoian population’s power in 16th century appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

New 13-million-year-old infant skull sheds light on ape ancestry

The discovery in Kenya of a remarkably complete fossil ape skull reveals what the common ancestor of all living apes and humans may have looked like. The find, announced in the scientific journal Nature on August 10th, belongs to anShow More Summary

Maize from El Gigante Rock Shelter shows early transition to staple crop

Mid-summer corn on the cob is everywhere, but where did it all come from and how did it get to be the big, sweet, yellow ears we eat today? The post Maize from El Gigante Rock Shelter shows early transition to staple crop appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Minoans and Mycenaeans

It is great to finally see the first data from the most ancient Greeks (Mycenaeans) and also the Cretan Minoans: Ancestrally. both Mycenaeans and Minoans were basically Mediterranean, well outside the variation of most Europeans and Near Easterners and >75% from early European-Anatolian farmers. Show More Summary

Arguing about species: Is it evidence, or ego?

For some people who follow human evolution news, recognizing “species” is really just about whether you’re a lumper or a splitter. Many people assume that the names of species are about ego, not evidence. But nature presents us withShow More Summary

Is there a trade-off between publication impact and open approaches?

Two Dutch biomedical researchers discuss how they are trying to move their institution away from mere quantity of research and citations, and toward real clinical impact: “Do our measures of academic success hurt science?”. They begin their essay with a scenario that reminds me of human evolution research: A Ph.D. Show More Summary

A Review of Jaime Maussan’s Alien Mummy from Peru

The following is a quick look at a strange but popular story making its rounds on the internet, mostly in Facebook. I have no doubt [...] The post A Review of Jaime Maussan’s Alien Mummy from Peru appeared first on Archaeology Revie...

Kinect scan of T. rex skull addresses paleontological mystery

Last year, a team of forensic dentists got authorization to perform a 3-D scan of the prized Tyrannosaurus rex skull at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, in an effort to try to explain some strange holes in the jawbone. The post Kinect scan of T. rex skull addresses paleontological mystery appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Deepest Neandertal mtDNA split

The authors interpret the new result from HST as placing a lower boundary on an introgression from Africans to Neandertals at more than 290kya, which explains why Africans are genomically closer to Neandertals than to Denisovans.Of course,...Show More Summary

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