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Patriarchy & The Ineptitude of Fathers

The physicist Wolfgang Pauli famously derided those with whom he disagreed using the insult, “you’re not even wrong.” This stinging reprimand was meant to imply that a proposed idea was so illogical that it didn’t even enter into the spectrum of falsehood. Show More Summary

Piri Reis Map and Claims of Antarctica

The Piri Reis map is one that often finds its way into the fringe archaeology discussion periodically as if it’s being discovered for the first [...] The post Piri Reis Map and Claims of Antarctica appeared first on Archaeology Revi...

The Stories We Tell about Resettlement: Refugees, Asylum and the #MuslimBan

By: Nadia El-Shaarawi As a volunteer legal advocate working with refugees who were seeking resettlement, I learned to ask detailed questions about persecution. These were the kind of questions you would never ask in polite conversation:...Show More Summary

Around the Web Digest: February 5

As I continue dealing with the crushing weight of anxiety on my journey to graduate school and the fetid assault on human dignity we call contemporary U.S. politics, I return with readings for the week. For any grad students who struggle...Show More Summary

The Maxilla of Kent’s Cavern: A Dating Controversy

The site of Kent’s Cavern is one of the most important early archaeological sites in the United Kingdom and caused a heated debate between palaeoanthropologists over the age of the KC4 fragment of human jaw in 2011. In 2017, a team of archaeologists re-assessed the archaeological sediments.

Gareth Dale on Karl Polanyi

Karl Polanyi (1886-1964) is difficult to summarize. A patriotic citizen of his native Hungary, he spoke German at home and identified with German intellectual culture. He was a Jew who converted to Christianity, as well as an Anglophile who was deeply impressed by the spiritual intensity of Russian culture. Show More Summary

Vulnerable Knowledge: DataRefuge and the Protection of Public Research

Judith Butler has written that “resistance is the mobilization of vulnerability,” arguing that precariousness animates action. This suggests that rather than a state of docile subjugation, vulnerability is a source of empowerment. AShow More Summary

LIDAR From Self Driving Cars and Archaeology

LIDAR (light detection and ranging) is a technology that’s gained lot of traction in archaeology over the last decade, though it’s been one of the [...] The post LIDAR From Self Driving Cars and Archaeology appeared first on Archaeology Review.

A practical guide for Iraqis living in Trump’s USA – or in the Gentile North in general

By: Hayder Al-Mohammad My fellow Iraqis. We are living under unheard of pressures and violence against us. Those of us who carry an Iraqi passport will have experienced the pain and humiliation of not being allowed entry into the USA...Show More Summary

SocArXiv launched

Michael Oman-Reagan just reminded me about an important open access project that’s been in the works for a while now: SocArXiv (thanks @OmanReagan!). I believe @socarxiv has the potential to change the social sciences so much I just found and followed the whole steering committee #OnHere. Show More Summary

Call for Reader Letters: Trump & Anthropology (DUE 2/20/17)

In December we published our first installment of our new Reader Letters series. This time around, we’d like to hear what you, our readers, have to say about the new US President, Donald J. Trump. What will Trump’s America mean for the...Show More Summary

Education, Experience & Output: Sharing Neoliberalized Space

The City University of New York (CUNY) is the largest urban university system in the country and ranks alongside the California and New York State systems for total enrollment. Until 1976, CUNY was entirely tuition-free. While remaining...Show More Summary

Pretend Swordplay: Hercules Swords and the Hornets’ Nest of Reality

When I was an adolescent, among my favorite movies were Zorro, The Three Musketeers, and Conan the Barbarian. My friends and I spent countless hours [...] The post Pretend Swordplay: Hercules Swords and the Hornets’ Nest of Reality appeared first on Archaeology Review.

Ancient DNA reveals ‘continuity’ between Stone Age and modern populations in East Asia

Researchers working on ancient DNA extracted from human remains interred almost 8,000 years ago in a cave in the Russian Far East have found that the genetic makeup of certain modern East Asian populations closely resemble that of their hunter-gatherer ancestors.

Refugees, Immigrants, and Trump’s Executive Order: Six Anthropologists Speak Out

By: Catherine Besteman, Elizabeth Cullen Dunn, Tricia Redeker Hepner, Carole McGranahan, Nomi Stone, and Marnie Thomson   The Racist Gift of Immigration and Citizenship Bans, Again Catherine Besteman How can we understand Donald Trump’s...Show More Summary

Hypothetical Archaeology: Knowledge Production in the Era of Alternative Facts

In the summer of 2015, in collaboration with a diverse collective of artists and ecologists known as Chance Ecologies, I was invited to help perform an excavation of a street in Hunters Point, Queens. The peculiar aspect of this excavation...Show More Summary

The Anthropology of Trump’s Executive Order on Immigration

Ever since the pioneering work of Mary Douglas on risk back in 1992, anthropologists have understood that there is a difference between what is actually dangerous and what people think is dangerous. Scientists can measure the probability of you being struck by a bolt of lightning or getting hit by a car. Show More Summary

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