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The Solar Eclipse and Archaeology

On August 21, 2017 there will be a total eclipse of the sun by the moon. Something that is getting a lot of hype as [...] The post The Solar Eclipse and Archaeology appeared first on Archaeology Review.

Arrival of modern humans in Southeast Asia questioned

Humans may have exited out of Africa and arrived in Southeast Asia 20,000 years earlier than previously thought, a new study involving University of Queensland researchers suggests. The post Arrival of modern humans in Southeast Asia questioned appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Ancient pottery reveals insights on Iroquoian population’s power in 16th century

An innovative study published today in the journal Science Advances demonstrates how decorations on ancient pottery can be used to discover new evidence for how groups interacted across large regions. The post Ancient pottery reveals insights on Iroquoian population’s power in 16th century appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

New 13-million-year-old infant skull sheds light on ape ancestry

The discovery in Kenya of a remarkably complete fossil ape skull reveals what the common ancestor of all living apes and humans may have looked like. The find, announced in the scientific journal Nature on August 10th, belongs to anShow More Summary

Maize from El Gigante Rock Shelter shows early transition to staple crop

Mid-summer corn on the cob is everywhere, but where did it all come from and how did it get to be the big, sweet, yellow ears we eat today? The post Maize from El Gigante Rock Shelter shows early transition to staple crop appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Minoans and Mycenaeans

It is great to finally see the first data from the most ancient Greeks (Mycenaeans) and also the Cretan Minoans: Ancestrally. both Mycenaeans and Minoans were basically Mediterranean, well outside the variation of most Europeans and Near Easterners and >75% from early European-Anatolian farmers. Show More Summary

Arguing about species: Is it evidence, or ego?

For some people who follow human evolution news, recognizing “species” is really just about whether you’re a lumper or a splitter. Many people assume that the names of species are about ego, not evidence. But nature presents us withShow More Summary

Is there a trade-off between publication impact and open approaches?

Two Dutch biomedical researchers discuss how they are trying to move their institution away from mere quantity of research and citations, and toward real clinical impact: “Do our measures of academic success hurt science?”. They begin their essay with a scenario that reminds me of human evolution research: A Ph.D. Show More Summary

A Review of Jaime Maussan’s Alien Mummy from Peru

The following is a quick look at a strange but popular story making its rounds on the internet, mostly in Facebook. I have no doubt [...] The post A Review of Jaime Maussan’s Alien Mummy from Peru appeared first on Archaeology Revie...

Kinect scan of T. rex skull addresses paleontological mystery

Last year, a team of forensic dentists got authorization to perform a 3-D scan of the prized Tyrannosaurus rex skull at the Field Museum of Natural History in Chicago, in an effort to try to explain some strange holes in the jawbone. The post Kinect scan of T. rex skull addresses paleontological mystery appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Deepest Neandertal mtDNA split

The authors interpret the new result from HST as placing a lower boundary on an introgression from Africans to Neandertals at more than 290kya, which explains why Africans are genomically closer to Neandertals than to Denisovans.Of course,...Show More Summary

Carved skulls provide the first evidence of a neolithic ‘skull cult’ at Göbekli Tepe

In Turkey, Carved Skulls Provide the First Evidence of a Neolithic "Skull Cult": Three carved skull fragments uncovered at a Neolithic dig site in Turkey feature modifications not seen before among human remains of the time, researchers...Show More Summary

Ancient skulls shed light on migration in the Roman empire

Skeletal evidence shows that, hundreds of years after the Roman Republic conquered most of the Mediterranean world, coastal communities in what is now south and central Italy still bore distinct physical differences to one another -Show More Summary

Genomes of straight-tusked elephants

Earlier this month in eLife, Matthias Meyer and colleagues published a cool paper: “Palaeogenomes of Eurasian straight-tusked elephants challenge the current view of elephant evolution”. The straight-tusked elephants lived in Europe and western Eurasia as far east as India during the Pleistocene. Show More Summary

Quote: W. W. Howells on naming Homo erectus

W. W. Howells, in the conclusion of the 1980 review, “Homo erectus–Who, When and Where: A Survey”: So we might be wise to be continually careful in writing about Homo erectus, making clear whether one is referring to a population orShow More Summary

Science blogs changing with the times?

A short piece “On the evolution of the science blogosphere” by the Andy Extance of the ScienceSeeker team has some interesting notes on current statistics in blogs. A quote from late in the article: It’s notable that despite this exorcism of sci-comm ghosts, the overall number of blogs aggregated by ScienceSeeker has fallen by less than 5%. Show More Summary

Should scientists refuse to review papers that do not make data available?

What should happen when scientists publish work that cannot be replicated? That’s an important question that people are asking more and more. So often, the basic results of research are hidden inside of figures that display results but don’t allow other scientists to inspect them or combine them together with other work in their own research. Show More Summary

The silliness of Rhesus negative blood and aliens, gods, nephilim, etc.

Going around and around the internet are memes-usually from people like Robert Sepehr (who claims to be an “anthropologist”)-about how there’s something significant about people [...] The post The silliness of Rhesus negative blood and aliens, gods, nephilim, etc. appeared first on Archaeology Review.

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