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Yonaguni: Monumental Ruins or Natural Geology?

Just a few dozen meters off the coast of the island of Yonaguni in Japan, which is situated very near Taiwan and considered the southwest-most [...] The post Yonaguni: Monumental Ruins or Natural Geology? appeared first on Archaeology Review.

The unexplored confound

First page of an underground porn comic, c. 1930s (Wikicommons). Pornography is now much more available and better in quality. My last post presented a German study whose findings suggest that prolonged exposure to porn atrophies those portions of the male brain that process erotic stimuli (Kühn and Gallinat 2014). Show More Summary

Farewell to Mboule Camara

This summer we lost someone that, if I can quote a former student and friend of mine (Dr. Michael Waller) was “one of the great characters of my life”. Mboule Camara died in late June 2017. He was born in Maragoundi, Senegal in the 1940s. Show More Summary

Human pigmentation mega-study

A great new study on the genetics of human (including African) pigmentation. I would love to see a future study that would reconstruct what ancestral modern humans looked like pigmentation-wise, as this trait is tightly correlated with...Show More Summary

New Neandertal and archaic human genomes advance our understanding of human evolution

Two new studies on ancient genomes provide valuable insights into the lives of our ancestors and their cousins, the Neandertals. The post New Neandertal and archaic human genomes advance our understanding of human evolution appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Prehistoric humans are likely to have formed mating networks to avoid inbreeding

Prehistoric humans are likely to have formed mating networks to avoid inbreeding The post Prehistoric humans are likely to have formed mating networks to avoid inbreeding appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News...

The Value of Context in Historical Archaeology

In business, people often say the three most important things to remember are 1) location, 2)location, 3) location. If you were to replace the word [...] The post The Value of Context in Historical Archaeology appeared first on Archaeology Review.

Morbidity and mortality of leprosy in the Middle Ages

During the Middle Ages, nearly everyone in Europe was exposed to the disfiguring, painful and ostracizing disease of leprosy. But did contracting the disease necessarily increase a person's chances of dying? The post Morbidity and mortality of leprosy in the Middle Ages appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Bones reveal social differences between the people buried in dolmens and those in caves

The researcher Teresa Fernández-Crespo, lead author of this study, had in a previous piece of work found demographic differences between the people buried in dolmens and those buried in caves: while male adults predominated in the dolmens,...Show More Summary

The canary in the coal mine?

Magazine rack in a Japanese store (Wikicommons - Corpse Reviver) Hugh Hefner's death has ended an era that actually ended around the turn of the millennium. Gone are the days of porn in limited supply. During my teen years Playboy wasn’t sold in my town. Show More Summary

Isotopic analyses link the lives of Late Neolithic individuals to burial location in Spain

An isotopic analysis of megalithic graves and caves in Spain may suggest the existence of a degree of differentiation in the lifeways of people buried in these different funerary sites The post Isotopic analyses link the lives of Late Neolithic individuals to burial location in Spain appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Tales from old bones

Around three thousand years ago Bantu began to spread east and south from the Nigeria/Cameroun border, eventually replacing the original inhabitants of eastern and southern Africa. Those people no longer exist. Only the DNA in their skeletal remains are left to speak for them. Show More Summary

Gene-culture coevolution in northwest Europe

Notre-Dame-de-Compassion, Paris. Women have more affective empathy than do men, an indication that it originated served to bind a mother to her young children. To different degrees, and in different societies, it has become extended to other human relations. Show More Summary

CSIC reconstructs how Neanderthals grew, based on an El Sidrón child

How did Neanderthals grow? Does modern man develop in the same way as Homo neanderthalensis did? How does the size of the brain affect the development of the body? A study led by the Spanish National Research Council (CSIC) researcher,...Show More Summary

Newly discovered 6m-year-old Cretan footprints stolen

There has been a lot of interest in our discovery of nearly-6m-year-old footprints on Crete, first reported by the The Conversation – suggesting that human ancestors could have roamed Europe at the same time as they were evolving in East Africa. The post Newly discovered 6m-year-old Cretan footprints stolen appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

An idea abandoned by its father

Italian wall lizard (Podarcis sicula) (Credit: Charles J. Sharp). Five mating pairs were taken from one island to another, and over the next thirty generations the transplanted population became remarkably different from the parent population. Show More Summary

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