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Gender equality and gene-culture co-evolution

The ratio of index finger length to ring finger length provides an index of sexual differentiation (source: Wikicommons) Are men and women more alike in some populations than in others? It's possible. First, boys and girls differentiate...Show More Summary

High coverage genome from 45,000-year old Siberian (Ust'-Ishim)

This is the oldest full genome of a modern human published to date and it also comes from a time (45 thousand years ago) that coincides with the Upper Paleolithic revolution in Eurasia.45 thousand years ago is probably close to when Eurasians started diverging from each other as they spread in all directions. Show More Summary

Ancient DNA from prehistoric inhabitants of Hungary

A very interesting new article on Europe describes new data from ancient Hungary from the Neolithic to the Iron Age. It is open access, so go ahead and read it. I will update this entry with some comments after I read the paper myself.UPDATE...Show More Summary

Ancestry Composition preprint

This is one of the main ancestry tools of 23andMe so it is nice to see its methodology described in detail. bioRxiv http://dx.doi.org/10.1101/010512 Ancestry Composition: A Novel, Efficient Pipeline for Ancestry Deconvolution Eric Y Durand et al. Show More Summary

Strategy of Condescension

That Facebook CEO Mark Zuckerberg gave an interview in Chinese was big news this week. You can see the start of the interview here: As you can hear, Zuckerberg’s performance was greeted with “repeated cheers and applause by the assembled students and faculty members.” I don’t want to pick apart Zuckerberg’s Chinese – he only started […]

Academic life is a trapeze, and librarians are the safety net: SM is now archived

This open access day I wanted to officially announce some good news — Savage Minds is now being archived at the University of Texas at Austin. Thanks to the initiative of Pat Galloway and her students Brian Douglass, Kathleen O’Connell, Josephine Ragolia, and Rachel Winston, an archive of our blog now lives on UT Austin’s Dspace install. (Update: I […]

Old Web City

Old Web City Over the next four weeks Sam Collins and Matthew Durington are posting a series of writings that are theoretical and activity extensions based on their recently published book Networked Anthropology (Routledge). Just like his colleague Sam Collins in Seoul walking the New App City, Durington meanders the streets of downtown Baltimore and […]

Pacific Anthropology Open Access Resources

Open access scholarship faces a lot of challenges, and sometimes we focus on those so much we lose sight of how successful the movement for open access is. Just take a look, for instance, at the absolutely ridonculous amount of open access resources there are out there for the Pacific. Pacific anthropology is a small […]

The end of Open Access Anthropology (.org)

Open access week is a time to celebrate new projects and look back at the success of old ones. However today (yes, it is still Tuesday in Honolulu) I also want to look back at one open access project that I recently said goodbye to: the website openaccessanthropology.org. OA Anthro was founded back in the […]

Chimps Caught in First Known Nighttime Crop Raids

Chimpanzees in Uganda’s Kibale National Park are supplementing their diet with maize from a plantation within the park’s borders. While crop raids are a well-known problem throughout the chimps’ range, these animals were filmed venturing...Show More Summary

Vaccinate gorillas against Ebola, Gorilla Doctors recommend

Veterinarians who care for wild gorillas want government permission to give the endangered animals an experimental Ebola vaccine in case of a nearby viral outbreak. Mike Cranfield, the Canadian co-director of the non-profit group Gorilla...Show More Summary

It’s Open Access Week!

It’s Open Access Week! This week the Internetz celebrates and affirms our scholarly ideals of openness: the right of readers to know, of authors to be known, and for our research to be reused to keep the Knowing More And Knowing Better train rolling right along. Anthropology, like much of the social sciences, has a more […]

Mourning, survival and time: Writing through crisis

This entry is part 8 of 8 in the Fall 2014 Writer’s Workshop series.(Savage Minds is pleased to post this essay by guest author Adia Benton as part of our Writer’s Workshop series. Adia is an assistant professor of anthropology at Brown University. She has worked in and studied the fields of development and global health since 2000, […]

New App City

Over the next four weeks Sam Collins and Matthew Durington are posting a series of writings that are theoretical and activity extensions based on their recently published book Networked Anthropology (Routledge). The Man of the Crowd–Android Version Collins downloads a free app from the Chongno District Government in Seoul, “Chongno Alleys” (?? ???).  The app […]

Laetoli Museum Closer To Reality

Laetoli, for those who don’t know, is the home of hominin footprints that are around 3.6 million years old. The footprints have posed a preservation problem to the paleoanthropology community – something I have written about here and here. Phys.Org has a press release on the subject: In many ways the museum is the brainchild […]

Today is Indigenous Peoples Day

Today we celebrate Indigenous Peoples Day, to remember and celebrate the heritage of indigenous people everywhere. There is a lot to say about IDP: is it too American? Does it elide the particularity of the American Indian experience? Is Dora The Conquistadora, perhaps, a bridge too far? And of course, there’s always this frequently-retweeted little […]

Ethnographic Fiction: The Space Between

This entry is part 7 of 7 in the Fall 2014 Writer’s Workshop series.(Savage Minds is pleased to post this essay by guest author Roxanne Varzi as part of our Writer’s Workshop series. Roxanne is Associate Professor of Anthropology at the University of California at Irvine. She is author of Warring Souls: Youth, Media, and Martyrdom […]

About Those Good Intentions

The following, the final in our series of extracts, comes from my chapter, “Imperial Abduction Lore and Humanitarian Seduction,” which serves as the introduction to Good Intentions: Norms and Practices of Imperial Humanitarianism (Montreal: Alert Press, 2014), pp. Show More Summary

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