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Hadrian's News in Brief

Any archaeologist will tell you that dealing with press is always fun; you may get all the right words—but not necessarily in the right order, so I am reasonably happy with results of a recent press briefing to my local paper, The Hexham Courant. Show More Summary

An Apulian Situla, the Becchina Archive, and a Munich Auction

Source: Becchina Archive The forthcoming auction at Gorny & Mosch is due to include an Apulian situla attributed to the Lycurgus painter (Lot 87). The collecting history is presented:Aus der James Stirt Collection, Vevey in der Schweiz,...Show More Summary

How the "Legitimate" Antiquities Market Operates and Deals with any Possible Paper TrailPalmyra, stashed at free ports

Another interesting antiquities case involving a free port, Geneva and some anonymous players on the international antiquities market: Swiss authorities said on Friday (Dec 2) they had seized cultural relics looted from Syria's ancient city of Palmyra, as well as from Libya and Yemen, which were being stored in Geneva's free ports. [...]Show More Summary

A Gnathian squat lekythos and the Becchina Archive

Source: Becchina archive Dr Christos Tsirogiannis has spotted that a Gnathian squat lekythos that is due to be auctioned by Gorny & Mosch (lot 127). The collecting history is provided:Ex Christie´s London, 15.04.2015, ex 113; aus der...Show More Summary

Sutton Hoo bitumen links Syria with Anglo-Saxon England

Analysis of black organic fragments found in the Sutton Hoo boat burial has revealed they are bitumen from Syria. The Suffolk site was excavated in 1939. Gold and garnet jewellery, silverware and ceremonial armour were discovered. The small black objects scattered among the 7th Century finds were believed to be pine tar used for boat maintenance. Show More Summary

Mummified remains identified as Egyptian Queen Nefertari

A team of international archaeologists believe a pair of mummified legs on display in an Italian museum may belong to Egyptian Queen Nefertari – the favourite wife of the pharaoh Ramses II.

Mummified knees are Queen Nefertari's, archaeologists conclude

A pair of mummified knees are most likely those of the famously beautiful spouse of Pharoah Ramses II, who died around 1250BC, say scientists A pair of mummified knees found in a tomb in Egypt’s Valley of the Queens are most likely those of Queen Nefertari, the royal spouse of Pharaoh Ramses II, say archaeologists. Show More Summary

Friday Varia and Quick Hits

It finally feels like winter here in North Dakotaland, but fortunately there are plenty of reasons to stay inside by the fire. This weekend’s highlights involve numerous conference championship footballing contests as well as the Mighty Spiders of the University of Richmond taking on the Fighting Hawks of the University of North Dakota right here… Read More ?

November Pieces Of My Mind #3

There was a major 19th century arts magazine titled Glissons, n’appuyons pas. This means “Let’s glide, not support”, that is, “Let’s live an easy life without having to support ourselves”. Opera reviews were a big thing in the mag. Private parking is “idiot parking” in Greek, because here the word idiot means “private person”. Our…

Just 16 US MOUs

Egypt's cultural MOU with the US signed on Nov 30 is one of the just 16 MOUs still current that the US has signed with other countries in the past three decades but then when one looks at the scale of the problem (like for example depicted...Show More Summary

Ice Age hunters may have deliberately cleared forests using fire

Large-scale forest fires started by prehistoric hunter-gatherers are probably the reason why Europe is not more densely forested.

Bitumen from Middle East discovered in 7th century buried ship in UK

Middle Eastern Bitumen, a rare, tar-like material, is present in the seventh century ship buried at Sutton Hoo, according to a study by Pauline Burger and colleagues from the British Museum, UK and the University of Aberdeen.

Self-recorder flogs off part of Collection

It looks like one of the PAS self-recorders is flogging off his finds after legitimating them through the Database...ANTYCZNA RZYMSKA FIBULA Rejestr PAS / UKDFD AngliaAntyczna rzymska fibula - typ Polden Hill - przedmiot widnieje w brytyjskich rejestrach PAS i UKDFD. Show More Summary

Method in the Archaeology of Late Antiquity

This week I’ve started work on a rather more technical publication project for The Digital Press at the University of North Dakota. (It’s TOP SECRET). I’m working to publish an archaeological field manual for a significant and long-standing excavation. The manual posses some interesting (but hardly unique) challenges. First, such documents with a few exceptions… Read More ?

An Etruscan bronze athlete from an old Swiss collection

Source: Schinousa archive Dr Christos Tsirogiannis has drawn attention to four items in the December sale of antiquities at Gorny & Mosch in Munich.I am particularly interested in the fifth century BC Etruscan bronze figure of a youth. Show More Summary

New Surfacings and Re-surfacings in Germany

Source: Schinoussa archive Cambridge based archaeologist Dr Christos Tsirogannis has made a number of new identifications for items that are due to be auctioned by Gorny & Mosch in Munich on 14 December 2016.Below is a text based on Tsirogiannis' notes and reproduced with his permission.1. Show More Summary

Black Death ‘Plague Pit’ discovered at 14th-century monastery hospital

A mass burial of bodies, known to be victims of the Black Death, has been discovered at the site of a 14th-century monastery hospital at Thornton Abbey, Lincolnshire.

Smug Collector Dismisses Rights of the 'Brown Skinned Foreigners'

Smug Washington collector on the recent Egypt MOU on artefact importation into US market:Peter Tompa ? @ Aurelius161180 47 min. 47 minut temu 11th hour Obama Admin gift to Egypt's dictators and archaeological lobby. 91% of comments to CPAC ignored. Show More Summary

Collecting histories and the Chesterman collection

Now that Bonhams has withdrawn an Etruscan antefix from its auction due to what appear to be links with the Medici Dossier it is important that the collecting histories of the Chesterman collection of terracottas are explored and investigated.Are...Show More Summary

Anglo-Saxon jewellery declared treasure

A piece of Anglo-Saxon jewellery discovered by a metal-detectorist in a Norfolk field near Diss has been declared Treasure ("Anglo-Saxon find in Norfolk declared treasure", BBC News November 29, 2016; see also "Anglo-Saxon pendant: Norfolk student makes 'royal' find", BBC News February 27, 2015). A subsequent excavation showed that this came from a female burial.

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