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Evidence of 'special site' for Bronze Age burials near Loch Ness

The latest grave to be found is pictured before and after soil was removed from inside it Archaeologists say they are finding increasing evidence that a site near Loch Ness was important for burials in the Bronze Age. A second 4,000-year-old...Show More Summary

The tense truce between detectorists and archaeologists

Metal detecting has a contentious history within the heritage community. Photograph: Antonio Olmos for the Observer There’s been reason for cheer in metal detecting circles, with the news this month that 2016 saw a record number of finds reported to the Portable Antiquities Scheme. Show More Summary

Hundreds of items from Georgian coffeehouse unearthed in Cambridge

Archaeologists excavating cellar find it full of crockery, bottles, pipes and jars from 18th century Clapham’s coffeehouse Clapham’s Coffeehouse closed down 250 years ago, no doubt to the anguish of its Cambridge regulars who met there to swop news and gossip, as well as drink cups of coffee and delicate china bowls of tea. Show More Summary

The tense truce between detectorists and archaeologists

Metal detecting is enjoying a resurgence, driven by good press and fantastic finds. But archaeologists are not overjoyed at the rise of the hobby detectorists. Why? There’s been reason for cheer in metal detecting circles, with the news this month that 2016 saw a record number of finds reported to the Portable Antiquities Scheme. Show More Summary

The Mezzanine and Kipple

Last year, I was obsessed (or at least very interested) in Philip K. Dick and his view of the material world and archaeology. In Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep, he introduces the word “kipple” to describe the proliferation of useless objects that reproduce in the absence of human presence. For Dick, kipple was the side-effect of useful… Read More ?

Colourful post on the 'Revised Code of "Responsible Metal Detecting"....' Which Appeared Without Fanfare

You would not know it, but there has been an extensive revision of the 'Code of Practice for Responsible Metal Detecting in England and Wales' which now has a new title 'Code of Practice for Responsible Metal Detecting in England and Wales (2017)' and a new numeration of points. Show More Summary

Reports of Demise of ISIL Have Been Greatly Exaggerated

Hashem Osseiran, 'Why Reports of ISIS’ Demise Have Been Greatly Exaggerated' Syria Deeply Dec. 15, 2017 The militants' last vestiges of territory are coming under severe strain by a wide array of rivals. It is only a matter of time before militants are driven to rugged hideouts in Homs and in the Euphrates Valley region. Show More Summary

Twelve Years Of Blogging

Today is my twelfth birthday as a blogger. 12 / 45.5 ~ 0.26 – I’ve been doing this for more than a quarter of my life! I love writing and being able to publish my stuff without any wait or editorial meddling. Following the demise of ScienceBlogs.com, I’m now on my third URL in twelve […]

Terminological Vaseline from the British Museum

“Metal-detecting can make an immense contribution to archaeological knowledge, if practised responsibly, and the vast majority of people are keen that their hobby has a positive impact.”(Michael Lewis, head of portable antiquities and...Show More Summary

Eshamun Sculptures Return to Lebanon

Antiquities and diplomacy, getting the special tablecloths out, the Office of the District Attorney of New York sent back to Lebanon and its citizens three looted artefacts that had turned up in New York. At the Repatriation Ceremony...Show More Summary

Manhattan DA now has Antiquities Trafficking Unit

The Manhattan District Attorney's office is opening an Antiquities Trafficking Unit to bring increased focus on suspiciously unpapered artefacts in the trade passing through the region and prosecute criminal offenders. This is obviously a good step forward in fight against dodgy antiquities on US market. Show More Summary

2500 year old cave paintings discovered on Indonesian island

Cave paintings on an unexplored Indonesian island has been discovered by researchers from The Australian National University (ANU). The post 2500 year old cave paintings discovered on Indonesian island appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Indonesian island found to be unusually rich in cave paintings

(Australian National University) A tiny Indonesian island, previously unexplored by archaeologists, has been found to be unusually rich in ancient cave paintings following a study by researchers from The Australian National University (ANU).

Friday Varia and Quick Hits

It’s been a long finals week with lots of grant-reviewing, grading, and some start-stop writing that probably just made me more work to do later. That being said, there was some exciting Sixers basketball, the start of a tense test match in Perth, and even some fluffy white snowflakes to holiday up North Dakotaland.  It’s… Read More ?

Sophie Flynn (Essex FLO) is Invited to Tell me What's What...

Here, Sophie, is a space for you. Send me your comments and I will publish them in full.[emoticon]

Looted Artefacts Represent the Destruction of the Past

A rather pedestrian article which reproduces what has been said before and adds little new, but useful to keep the issue in the public eye: Lexi Churchill and Jiwon Choi, 'In looted artifacts, archaeologist sees destruction of past'Show More Summary

The antiquities trade always destroys knowledge.

A Smithsonian Magazine article is misleadingly called 'Archaeologists Are Only Just Beginning to Reveal the Secrets Hidden in These Ancient Manuscripts' (palaeography probably would be a better description) but there is another point...Show More Summary

Antiquities trade: Is it any wonder we are where we are?

A few days ago, a lobbyist for the no-questions-asked antiquities trade Peter Tompa published an article on his 'Cultural Property Obfuscator' blog called 'Hipster Internet Art Newsletter Raises Alarm About Antiquities being "Weaponized"...Show More Summary

Ancient feces reveal parasites described in earliest Greek medical texts

(University of Cambridge) Earliest archaeological evidence of intestinal parasitic worms infecting the ancient inhabitants of Greece confirms descriptions found in writings associated with Hippocrates, the early physician and 'father of Western medicine.'

2018 AIA Abstract: The Medieval Countryside at a Regional Scale in the Western Argolid and Northeastern Peloponnesus

It’s Archaeological Institute of America Season, and I offered to take the first swing at our paper for this January’s annual archaeology festival. Here’s our abstract: The Medieval Countryside at a Regional Scale in the Western Argolid...Show More Summary

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