All Blogs / Academics / Archaeology / New

Seizure in Bulgaria

Police in Bulgaria seized more than 90 artifacts on March 15 from an organised group involved in crimes against cultural heritage, the Ministry of Interior said. The objects were obtained via illegal excavations in Bulgaria. Of the artifacts...Show More Summary

Three and a Half Thoughts on Open Access Publishing

This afternoon, I’m moderating a panel titled “Remodeling Academic Publishing: New Tools, New Challenges, and a New Culture” at something called the Grand Challenges Symposium with the Dean of the Libraries, Stephanie Walker, my colleagues David Haeselin (English) and Eric Burin (History). Show More Summary

New linguistic analysis finds Dravidian language family is approximately 4,500 years old

(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) The origin of the Dravidian language family, consisting of about 80 varieties spoken by 220 million people across South Asia, can be dated to about 4,500 years ago, based on new linguistic analyses. Show More Summary

From the pyramids to Stonehenge – were prehistoric people astronomers?

Ever since humans could look up to see the sky, we have been amazed by its beauty and untold mysteries. Naturally then, astronomy is often described as the oldest of the sciences, inspiring people for thousands of years. The post From the pyramids to Stonehenge – were prehistoric people astronomers? appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

The negative market reaction to the very mild diligence guidelines the BATG

Cultura Consulting @Cultura_CP 1 godz. 1 godzin? temu 1 godzin? temu 1 godzin? temu Wi?cej The 2012 Basel Art Trade Guidelines paper is here: https://www. ve.localhost/files/publications/basel_art_trade_guidelines.pdf...Show More Summary

'Metal Detectorist has Haul' of Treasure

Debbie King, 'A rare hoard of 2,000 year-old gold coins have been found in a farmer's field near Chiddingstone' Ten solid gold coins dating back to the Iron Age have been discovered in a field near Chiddingstone. The rare find was hauled...Show More Summary

Temple facade at Tel Jokha, Iraq

Today is the fifteenth anniversary of the start of the 2003 invasion of sovereign country Iraq, among other things this led to the looting of many sites across the country, especially in the south. This is the Ur III temple facade destroyed by looters in Umma, Tell Jokha, a site that reportedly is still being looted.

A Conservation Issue

Sudan, the world's last male Northern White Rhino has died. There are two females left of the species. Once their lives end, the species will be lost to this world forever. Poachers are the reason for this. Trophy hunting drives demand,...Show More Summary

March Pieces Of My Mind #2

At the DiLeva sings Bowie show last night, there were two songs from after 1985: “Where Are We Now?” from The Next Day (2013) and “Lazarus” from Blackstar (2016). Driving practice with a young friend from Homs. Super happy fellow after he aced his first motorway and then parked the car neatly in our garage. […]

The University of North Dakota’s Writers Conference

The first week after spring break every year (well, at least for the last 49 years), is the University of North Dakota’s Writers Conference. It’s an annual gathering of writers and readers from around the world and around the state. This year’s theme is “Truth and Lies” which seems both intriguing and contemporary. The features authors include… Read More ?

Cyprus is Everywhere

Last week, Annemarie Weyl Carr asked if anyone could offer a summary of a recent publication that they might share with the Cyprus American Archaeological Research Institute’s newsletter.  I thought it would be fun to share my most recent book on the Bakken, which in very real ways had its origins in the Eastern Mediterranean and… Read More ?

Celebrating Wesley College’s Corwin Hall

I’m on the road today delivering boxes of North Dakota Quarterlys to the Magic City, but I figured folks might enjoy a video from yesterday’s send off for Corwin Hall. Here’s a blog post on that. We’ll release a far higher fidelity recording of the music next month, but for now, here’s a Facebook video.… Read More ?

The truth behind St. Patrick's Day: Celebrations did not originate in Boston

(University of South Florida (USF Health)) Gun expenditure log from 1600 and 1601 prove St. Patrick's Day celebrations began in St. Augustine, Fla., and not in Boston or New York.

Smithsonian reports first evidence of live-traded dogs for Maya ceremonies

(Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute) Earliest evidence that Mayas raised and traded dogs and other animals-probably for ceremonies-from Ceibal, Guatemala. Published in the Proceedings of the National Academies of Science.

Scientists discover evidence of early human innovation, pushing back evolutionary timeline

(Smithsonian) Scientists discovered that early humans in East Africa had -- by about 320,000 years ago -- begun trading with distant groups, using color pigments and manufacturing more sophisticated tools than those of the Early Stone Age, tens of thousands of years earlier than previous evidence has shown in eastern Africa. Show More Summary

Symposium: The Horse in Ancient Greek Art

The Virginia Museum of Fine Arts will be hosting a symposium in April 2018. It will explore some of the themes emerging from the exhibition, 'The Horse in Ancient Greek Art'. It would have been interesting for one of the papers to have explored the histories of some of the objects appearing in the show. Show More Summary

Intensification of agriculture and social hierarchies evolve together, study finds

(Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History) A joint project between the Max Planck Institute for the Science of Human History and the University of Auckland analyzed the evolution of 155 Island South East Asian and Pacific...Show More Summary

The absence of ants -- entomologist confirms first Saharan farming 10,000 years ago

(University of Huddersfield) Dr. Stefano Vanin was part of an international team working on discoveries at the Holocene age hunter-gatherer site at Takarkori in south-western Libya.

Modern humans flourished through ancient supervolcano eruption 74,000 years ago

(University of Cape Town) Early modern humans living in South Africa around 74,000 years ago prospered through the cataclysmic eruption of the Toba supervolcano in Sumatra. The Toba eruption was one of the Earth's most explosive volcanic events. Show More Summary

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC