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People power: how citizen science could change historical research

Crowdsourcing research by ‘non-specialists’ could help historians investigate big-data archives, and in the process make everyone an expert Citizen science is a digital method, which has been applied to a range of big-data scientific problems. Show More Summary

Half of Western European men descended from one Bronze Age ‘king’

Mass graves were replaced by individual burials for the elite in the Bronze Age showing a shift in social structure CREDIT: PA H alf of Western European men are descended from one Bronze Age ‘king’ who sired a dynasty of elite nobles which spread throughout Europe, a new study has shown. Show More Summary

11 reasons William Shakespeare was the original Shoreditch hipster

A n archaeological dig is expected to find Shoreditch is the home of Shakespeare, putting Stratford-Upon-Avon and the Globe in the shade. The Museum of London Archaeology is leading a project to uncover and explore the remains of the Curtain Theatre, the 16 th and 17 th century venue where Shakespeare is known to have first staged Romeo and Juliet. Show More Summary

The Impossibility of a Slow Professor? (Part 2)

The problem of making a post with a “part 1” is that I feel obligated to publish a “part 2.” Go read Part 1, which is basically a review of  Maggie Berg’s and Barbara Seeber’s The Slow Professor (Toronto 2016). In it, I suggest that the problem with their lovely little book is that many (if not all)… Read More ?

Speed and Practice for a Digital Archaeology

I spent rainy and grey Sunday afternoon Skyping away to glorious Boulder, Colorado and a panel at the Theoretical Archaeology Group annual meeting. The papers were engaging and the conversation was fruitful. My paper is “below the fold.” As per usual, everything is always about me, and the biggest take away that I have from… Read More ?

The secret life of an archaeologist: soil in your sandwiches and sexism on sites

I ended up in archaeology as a result of a long-held romantic notion of making great discoveries and solving mysteries. As a kid I always had my head buried in books, lost in the realms of the great ancient civilisations of the world. Show More Summary

The Archaeology of Anglesey

The Archaeology of Anglesey 1 to 5 November 2016 The island of Anglesey has a wealth of archaeological sites of all periods. This EMAS Archaeology study tour will visit the most important sites of the prehistoric, Roman and medieval periods. Show More Summary

Archaeologists have found a Roman child's stone coffin and a mosaic at a former villa site in Wiltshire

Rug designer Luke Irwin and Historic England Archaeologist Dr David Roberts on the incredible discovery of what could be one of the country's largest Roman villas near a house in Wiltshire Rug designer Luke Irwin has discovered a Roman...Show More Summary

‘Be cheerful, live your life:’ Ancient mosaic ‘meme’ found in Turkey’s south

What could be considered an ancient motivational meme which reads “be cheerful, live your life” in ancient Greek has been discovered on a centuries-old mosaic found during excavation works in the southern province of Hatay. Demet Kara,...Show More Summary

An Anonymous Archaeologist Afraid to tell metal Detectorist What is What

There is a nicely-written article in the Guardian about being an archaeologist (Anonymous, 'The secret life of an archaeologist: soil in your sandwiches and sexism on sites' The Guardian Monday 25 April 2016). The author mentions artefact hunters: Equally, metal detectorists can be the stuff of nightmares when on a dig. Show More Summary

Coastal & Marine - Month 3

Over recent weeks much of my work has revolved around the upcoming dive season and finds reported to us through the dredging protocols. As a recreational dive instructor I have had very little dealings with surface supply equipment or even full-face masks. Show More Summary

I’m @sweden This Week On Twitter

The Swedish Institute is, according to Wikipedia, a Government agency in Sweden with the responsibility to spread information about Sweden outside the country. One way the organisation does this is the Twitter account @sweden, which is handed over to a new Swede every week. This week it’s me.

Romsey Abbey: The mystery of the hair in the coffin

For the past few months, archaeologists have been testing a full head of hair found in a coffin. Is it the hair of a saint? In October 1839, the work of some gravediggers came to an abrupt halt when their tools hit something hard. It was a lead coffin. Show More Summary

Antiquities Collecting: Power Relations and Social Approval

Dr Donna Yates, photo: Mark Gibson There is an article in the Scottish Herald focussed on Dr Donna Yates who offers some thoughts on why the present system of dealing with trafficking is failing, and what we need to do about it. Above all though it depends on power relations and social approval: “The other side is that there is a market for it. Show More Summary

Whose heritage and Why? Conflict over a Museum

The present Polish government's approach to historiography is very controversial:Poland’s conservative government is taking steps that threaten an ambitious new World War II museum which international experts have spent eight years creating...Show More Summary

Did volcano eruptions tip Europe into Dark Ages?

Back-to-back volcanic eruptions in the mid-6th century darkened Europe's skies for more than a year and may have ushered in the Dark Ages, according to finding to be presented Friday at a science conference in Vienna. "Either would have...Show More Summary

Did volcano eruptions tip Europe into Dark Ages?

Back-to-back volcanic eruptions in the mid-6th century darkened Europe's skies for more than a year and may have ushered in the Dark Ages, according to finding to be presented Friday at a science conference in Vienna. "Either would have...Show More Summary

Going Greek in the Holy Land

Jerusalem Dig Uncovers Ancient Greek Citadel Israeli archaeologists have uncovered the remnants of an impressive fort built more than two thousand years ago by Greeks in the center of old Jerusalem. The ruins are the first solid evidence of an era in which Hellenistic culture held sway in this ancient city. The citadel, until now known only [...]

Archaeologists discover skeletons of cows and pony, domestic oven and industrial complex in medieval Scottish town

From wells to a pony, a huge dig next to the 19th century Town House in the Scottish town of Irvine has produced some amazing archaeological finds dating back to the 13th century. Claire Williamson, who is leading the project for Rathmell...Show More Summary

Iron age man was as fond of Swiss cheese as we are

Archaeologists have uncovered evidence that Swiss cheesemaking dates back to prehistoric times, paving the way for such delicacies as Gruyere and Emmental. An international team led by the University of York and Newcastle University looked at the composition of residues left on fragments of ceramic pots found at six sites in the Swiss Alps. Show More Summary

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