All Blogs / Academics / Biology / Popular


Foster tadpoles trigger parental instinct in poison frogs

(University of Veterinary Medicine -- Vienna) Especially male poison frogs piggyback their offspring to pools in the rainforest. Now, researchers from Vetmeduni Vienna, the University of Vienna and Harvard University showed that this parental behavior can be triggered experimentally. Show More Summary

10,000 year-old DNA proves when fish colonialized our lakes

(Umea University) DNA in lake sediment forms a natural archive displaying when various fish species colonized lakes after the glacial period. This according to researchers at the Department of Ecology and Environmental Science at Umeå University in a study published in the journal Methods in Ecology and Evolution.

Plant physiology: Adjusting to fluctuating temperatures

(Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München) Later leaf emergence, earlier leaf loss: A new study of Ludwig-Maximilians-Universitaet (LMU) in Munich shows that the average vegetation periods of trees and shrubs in North America are intrinsically three weeks shorter than those of comparable species in Europe and Asia.

Small intestine permeable peptides facilitate digestive tract absorption

(Kumamoto University) Biopharmaceuticals, medium- and high-molecular weight biologically active macromolecules, are not easily absorbed by the small intestine, the main organ responsible for gastrointestinal absorption, resulting in a bottleneck for oral administration type biopharmaceutical development. Show More Summary

Test for safe CO2 storage to aid world-leading technology project

(University of Edinburgh) A test that inexpensively monitors the safe storage of industrial carbon dioxide gas emissions in carbon capture and storage technology is to be used at a $5 million test site in Canada.

Rolling dice for cell size specification in plant leaf epidermis

(National Institutes of Natural Sciences) Associate Professor Kensuke Kawade at Okazaki Institute for Integrative Bioscience and National Institute for Basic Biology, in collaboration with Professor Hirokazu Tsukaya at the Graduate School...Show More Summary

Breaking legume's crop wild relative barrier

(American Society of Agronomy) In a new study, scientists report significant strides in transferring disease- and stress-resistance traits from wild relatives of several legumes to their domesticated varieties.

Beelzebufo ampinga- Consumer of Dinosaurs

Giant Prehistoric Frog Capable of Tackling Small Dinosaurs Ever since it was formally named and described back in 2008, the beach-ball-sized Late Cretaceous frog Beelzebufo (B. ampinga) has fascinated scientists.  The fossil record of frogs (Order Anura), is very poor, although these small, usually unobtrusive creatures have a long evolutionary history.  Imagine the surprise of

Breaking legume's crop wild relative barrier

Domesticating plants to grow as crops can turn out to be a double-edged scythe.

Bite force research reveals dinosaur-eating frog

Scientists say that a large, now extinct, frog called Beelzebufo that lived about 68 million years ago in Madagascar would have been capable of eating small dinosaurs.

10,000 year-old DNA proves when fish colonized lakes

DNA molecules in lake sediment are few and hard bound to particles. This resulted in challenging analyses and required development of new methods, both for extracting sufficiently clean DNA and for the statistical analysis of data. For this work, doctoral student Fredrik Olajos and researcher Folmer Bokma's efforts were of particular importance.

Tidally-induced variations of pH at the head of the Laurentian Channel

The head of the Laurentian Channel (LC) is a very dynamic region of exceptional biological richness. To evaluate the impact of freshwater discharge, tidal mixing, and biological activity on the pH of surface waters in this region, a suite of physical and chemical variables was measured throughout the water column over two tidal cycles. The […]

In vivo pH measurement at the site of calcification in an octocoral

Calcareous octocorals are ecologically important calcifiers, but little is known about their biomineralization physiology, relative to scleractinian corals. Many marine calcifiers promote calcification by up-regulating pH at calcification sites against the surrounding seawater. Show More Summary

Biomolecules from deep time can help to reconstruct the tree of life

Applying spectroscopy techniques to tricky fossil leaves enables researchers to work out their evolutionary relationships The tree of life is almost entirely composed of dead branches. The species which exist on the Earth today are the...Show More Summary

Adjusting to fluctuating temperatures

The duration of the vegetation period – i.e. the time that elapses between leafing out (the emergence of the first leaf) in spring and the initiation of leaf loss in autumn – is a highly significant ecological parameter that has a considerable influence on both plant productivity and the biogeochemical cycling of vital nutrients in ecosystems. Show More Summary

Barn owls found to suffer no hearing loss as they age

(Phys.org)—A small team of researchers with the University of Oldenburg has found that barn owls do not suffer hearing loss as they get older. In their paper published in Proceedings of the Royal Society B, the group describes hearing...Show More Summary

Impacts of ocean acidification on sensory function in marine organisms

Ocean acidification has been identified as a major contributor to ocean ecosystem decline, impacting the calcification, survival, and behavior of marine organisms. Numerous studies have observed altered sensory perception of chemical, auditory, and visual cues after exposure to elevated CO2. Show More Summary

Using mineralogy and higher-level taxonomy as indicators of species sensitivity to pH: a case-study of Puget Sound

Information on ecosystem sensitivity to global change can help guide management decisions. Here, we characterize the sensitivity of the Puget Sound ecosystem to ocean acidification by estimating, at a number of taxonomic levels, the direct sensitivity of its species. Show More Summary

Saving amphibians from a deadly fungus means acting without knowing all the answers

The calls of frogs on warm nights in the spring are a welcome sound, telling listeners that the seasons are changing and summer is coming. Today, however, ponds that once echoed with the chirps, chuckles and calls of frogs and toads are falling silent around the world.

Foster tadpoles trigger parental instinct in poison frogs

Poison frogs, especially male poison frogs, are very caring parents. After the tadpoles hatch, the males piggyback their offspring to distant pools spread around the rainforest where they can feed and develop. In a recent study, a team...Show More Summary

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC