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montereybayaquarium: Try as she might, MacKenzie Bubel just...

montereybayaquarium: Try as she might, MacKenzie Bubel just couldn’t satisfy the baby comb jellies. The aquarist was attempting to spawn a species called Mnemiopsis leidyi—a ghostly-looking little creature native to the Gulf of Mexico—in the Aquarium’s Jelly Lab. Show More Summary

montereybayaquarium: This is Part 2 of our story about how...

montereybayaquarium: This is Part 2 of our story about how cunning aquarists and colleagues cracked the code of comb jelly culture. Click here for Part 1. Untangling comb jelly culture was a little fishy. Even with decades of attempts,...Show More Summary

Missions CARIOCA – Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée – Acclimatation des coraux à l’acidification des océans (in French)

Une équipe internationale pilotée par l’IRD embarque à bord de l’Alis pour étudier en Papouasie-Nouvelle-Guinée des espèces de coraux capables de se développer dans des sites naturellement plus acides. Objectif : en savoir plus sur leur...Show More Summary

A direct CO2 control system for ocean acidification experiments: testing effects on the coralline red algae Phymatolithon lusitanicum

Most ocean acidification (OA) experimental systems rely on pH as an indirect way to control CO2. However, accurate pH measurements are difficult to obtain and shifts in temperature and/or salinity alter the relationship between pH and pCO2. Here we describe a system in which the target pCO2 is controlled via direct analysis of pCO2 in […]

Ocean Acidification “State of the Science” Workshop, 30 November – 1 December 2016, Anchorage, Alaska

Date and time: November 30, 2016 9:00 AM – December 1, 2016 6:00 PM (AKST) Location: Anchorage Downtown Marriott Registration: This workshop is free and open to the public. Please register by November 7. The Alaska Ocean Acidification Network is hosting a TWO-day workshop in Anchorage, inviting a broad audience across the state interested in ocean acidification issues. […]

neaq: What may look like two eyes above a smiling mouth are...

neaq: What may look like two eyes above a smiling mouth are actually the skate’s nostrils. #visitorpicture by @krysmetcalf #regram #skate #oceananimal #smileyface #boston #massachusetts #localspecies

We’ve spotted our first Western grebe of the season off the...

We’ve spotted our first Western grebe of the season off the back deck! These sociable birds spend the summer breeding season on lakes and ponds, migrating to the Pacific coast for the winter.

Do the wave! Jeweled top snails walk left and right with...

Do the wave! Jeweled top snails walk left and right with alternating waves of their creeping foot!

Is a peek at our Penguin Cam what your Wednesday morning...

Is a peek at our Penguin Cam what your Wednesday morning needs? Watch carefully and you might even see them communicating with each other. When penguins flap their wings or bow their heads, they’re telling each other how they feel. Throwing their heads back and wings out means “I’m happy.” Leaning forward and opening their beaks means “Go away.”

Carbonate chemistry in sediment porewaters of the Rhône River delta driven by early diagenesis (northwestern Mediterranean) (update)

The Rhône River is the largest source of terrestrial organic and inorganic carbon for the Mediterranean Sea. A large fraction of this terrestrial carbon is either buried or mineralized in the sediments close to the river mouth. This mineralization follows aerobic and anaerobic pathways, with a range of impacts on calcium carbonate precipitation and dissolution […]

Benthic foraminiferal shell weight: Deglacial species-specific responses from the Santa Barbara Basin

Here we present a record of size-normalized shell weight for four species of benthic foraminifera through a period of rapid environmental change during the most recent deglaciation (Santa Barbara Basin, CA). A strong Oxygen Minimum Zone...Show More Summary

Sea food industry faces threat from ocean acidification, rising temperatures: Study

Researchers observed that ocean acidification could threaten lobsters and also affect the behavior and size of the larva. Rise in the water temperatures of Gulf of Maine within a century can be threatening for lobsters and the sea food industry, according to the latest research conducted by the University of Maine Darling Marine Center and […]

kqedscience: Sea Urchins Pull Themselves Inside Out to be...

kqedscience: Sea Urchins Pull Themselves Inside Out to be Reborn  Scientists are investigating how these microscopic ocean drifters find their way back home to the shoreline, grow into spiny creatures and live out a slow-moving life that often exceeds 100 years. #DeepLook via @kqedscience and @pbsdigitalstudios

Meet the newest critter in our Tentacles special exhibition:...

Meet the newest critter in our Tentacles special exhibition: The broadclub cuttlefish! This second-largest member of the cuttlefish family gets its name from it’s two club-like tentacles, which it uses to strike and grab prey. Thank you to staffer Jim Perdue for the photo!

earthstory: It’s like a swimming cauliflower Spotted jelly!...

earthstory: It’s like a swimming cauliflower Spotted jelly! Also known as a “lagoon jelly” because it lives in bays, harbors and lagoons in the South Pacific.

Surgery Day

Today was a surgery day. Typically we do surgery 1-2 times a week; depending on the turtles that we currently have. We’ll do multiple surgeries in 1 day, sort of like a sea turtle assembly line. Then once they are done with surgery, they get to recuperate inside the emergency room. Below is Olivia, one […]

You’ve got to see them to melibe-lieve! With a foot for...

You’ve got to see them to melibe-lieve! With a foot for a belly, wing-like appendages, and Venus flytraps for faces, Melibe leonina nudibranch sea slugs are some of the most unusual inhabitants of the kelp forest! Swaying on kelp blades,...Show More Summary

Biogeographic variability in the physiological response of the cold-water coral Lophelia pertusa to ocean acidification

While ocean acidification is a global issue, the severity of ecosystem effects is likely to vary considerably at regional scales. The lack of understanding of how biogeographically separated populations will respond to acidification hampers our ability to predict the future of vital ecosystems. Show More Summary

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