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The pyjama squid’s stripes are really channels of...

The pyjama squid’s stripes are really channels of chromatophores—pigment sacks that stretch and crumple to reveal dark colors or clear skin.

Bodega Bay: “Oysters, Abalone, and Ocean Acidification”, 30 October 2017, UC Davis

Date & time: 30 October 2017, 7:30 am – 6:00 pm Location: Bodega Bay, UC Davis, California Registration fee: $25 (lunch included) Organizer: Kat Kerlin, UC Davis Strategic Communications The West Coast is prized for its productive fisheries and stunning coastlines, but warming temperatures and rising acidity are causing changes previously unseen in the Pacific. See […]

Scientist talks CO2 and ‘cocolithophores’ in Newburyport program

NEWBURYPORT – A Harvard University scientist walked a crowd through the intricacies of carbon dioxide, the increasing acidity of oceans, and a microscopic creature called the cocolithophore Wednesday night. Cocolithophores, George D. Buckley explained, are microscopic plankton that look like soccer balls with hubcaps attached on all sides. They live by the trillions in the […]

UCLA students study acidification of kelp in Santa Monica Bay

One month ago, Ariel Pezner spent nine hours straight aboard a research vessel in the Santa Monica Bay, circulating the waves above an underwater kelp forest. Pezner, a fourth-year environmental science student, is part of a six-person student team studying ocean acidification in a rehabilitated forest of kelp off the coast of Palos Verdes, California. This […]

Benthic pH gradients across a range of shelf sea sediment types linked to sediment characteristics and seasonal variability

This study used microelectrodes to record pH profiles in fresh shelf sea sediment cores collected across a range of different sediment types within the Celtic Sea. Spatial and temporal variability was captured during repeated measurements in 2014 and 2015. Show More Summary

5-1-17 Printable Calendar for May 2017

Monday, May 1st...sorting through some images today......while out with Capt. Jim......from the dock in Friday Harbor......while on research boat (used with permission)......while on the Western Prince......calendar for May? feel free...Show More Summary

After a tuna work, we have new yellowfin—"ahi"—tuna in...

After a tuna work, we have new yellowfin—"ahi"—tuna in the Open Sea exhibit!  Buyer beware: not all ahi is created equal. If you’re having your own ahi moment, use the Seafood Watch app to find the good stuff:.

Sea otters often spin without dunking their limbs to keep...

Sea otters often spin without dunking their limbs to keep flippers and paws toasty! You may have noticed that Foreground Otter has two flipper tags—this is an otter that is being studied as a part of our sea otter research program. Every...Show More Summary

noaasanctuaries: The deep sea holds strange and wonderful...

noaasanctuaries: The deep sea holds strange and wonderful creatures. While diving with a remotely operated vehicle off Salmon Bank in Papah?naumoku?kea Marine National Monument, the NOAA Office of Ocean Exploration and Research came across this Ophidiid fish, or cusk eel!  (Photo: NOAA) 

A giant larvacean with a huge mucous house. Need we say...

A giant larvacean with a huge mucous house. Need we say more?  Researchers at the Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute (MBARI) are using remotely operated vehicles, video cameras, and lasers to study giant larvaceans right in their own habitat. Show More Summary

noaasanctuaries: Manta rays are frequent visitors to Flower...

noaasanctuaries: Manta rays are frequent visitors to Flower Garden Banks National Marine Sanctuary in the Gulf of Mexico! If you’re diving, make sure to give them plenty of space – if they want to hang out with you, they will. GIF transcript below the cut. Keep reading

Have you seen this handsome frog hanging out near our Coastal...

Have you seen this handsome frog hanging out near our Coastal Stream exhibit? The California red-legged frog boasts a distinguished history as the official amphibian of California, as well as the star of Mark Twain’s “The CelebratedShow More Summary

That’s a chin fit for urchin! Using their mighty jaws,...

That’s a chin fit for urchin! Using their mighty jaws, California sheephead crunch and munch shelled invertebrates—like sea urchins—for lunch. By pruning the kelp forest of its predators, sheephead contribute to the health of California’s underwater gardens. Thanks to guest Jeff Reynolds for the photo!

Cold-water corals: acidification harms, warming promotes growth

Because they build their skeletons from calcium carbonate, cold-water corals such as the globally distributed species Lophelia pertusa are considered particularly threatened by ocean acidification. This change in seawater chemistry, caused by the absorption of carbon dioxide (CO2) from the atmosphere, reduces the concentration of carbonate ions. Show More Summary

Ocean warming to cancel increased CO2-driven productivity

University of Adelaide researchers have constructed a marine food web to show how climate change could affect our future fish supplies and marine biodiversity. Published today in Global Change Biology, the researchers found that high...Show More Summary

Boosted food web productivity through ocean acidification collapses under warming

Future climate is forecast to drive bottom-up (resource driven) and top-down (consumer driven) change to food web dynamics and community structure. Yet, our predictive understanding of these changes is hampered by an over-reliance on simplified laboratory systems centred on single trophic levels. Show More Summary

The complex effects of ocean acidification on the prominent N2-fixing cyanobacterium Trichodesmium

Acidification of seawater caused by anthropogenic carbon dioxide (CO2) is anticipated to influence the growth of dinitrogen (N2)–fixing phytoplankton, which contribute a large fraction of primary production in the tropical and subtropical ocean. Show More Summary

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