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New Genome Browser product gives freedom to easily collaborate in the cloud

(University of California - Santa Cruz) The newly launched Genome Browser in the Cloud (GBiC) introduces new freedom to collaborate by allowing rapid Browser installation, in any UNIX-based cloud. It also offers significantly reduced installation time as compared to earlier Genome Browser versions.

Scientists create first stable semisynthetic organism

Life's genetic code has only ever contained four natural bases. These bases pair up to form two "base pairs"—the rungs of the DNA ladder—and they have simply been rearranged to create bacteria and butterflies, penguins and people. Four bases make up all life as we know it.

Sharks gather off Israel in pilgrimage to warm waters

Sharks have gathered off a coastal electricity plant in northern Israel where the Mediterranean waters are warmer, prompting authorities on Monday to warn people to keep away.

New steps in the meiosis chromosome dance

Where would we be without meiosis and recombination? For a start, none of us sexually reproducing organisms would be here, because that's how sperm and eggs are made. And when meiosis doesn't work properly, it can lead to infertility, miscarriage, birth defects and developmental disorders.

Research describes missing step in how cells move their cargo

Every time a hormone is released from a cell, every time a neurotransmitter leaps across a synapse to relay a message from one neuron to another, the cell must undergo exocytosis. This is the process responsible for transporting cellular...Show More Summary

Researchers identify receptor that has key role in umami or amino acid taste in insects

Insects, like mammals including humans, sort chemicals by taste into a few categories and use this information to decide whether to ingest or reject food.

Lab charts the anatomy of three molecular channels

Using a state-of-the-art imaging technology in which molecules are deep frozen, scientists in Roderick MacKinnon's lab at Rockefeller University have reconstructed in unprecedented detail the three-dimensional architecture of three channels that provide a path for specific types of ions to travel across a cell's protective membrane. Show More Summary

Organisms created with synthetic DNA pave way for new entirely new life forms

E coli microbes have been modified to carry an expanded genetic code which researchers say will ultimately allow them to be programmed From the moment life gained a foothold on Earth its story has been written in a DNA code of four letters. Show More Summary

New steps in the meiosis chromosome dance

(University of California - Davis) Where would we be without meiosis and recombination? A new paper published online Jan. 6 in the journal Science describes how proteins called SUMO and ubiquitin and molecular machines called proteasomes play a crucial role in DNA recombination during meiosis.

Insects and umami receptors

(University of California - Riverside) Insects, like mammals including humans, sort chemicals by taste into a few categories and use this information to decide whether to ingest or reject food. University of California, Riverside researchers have identified a receptor playing a key role in insect identification of amino acid, or umami, taste.

Choreographing the microRNA-target dance

(UT Southwestern Medical Center) Molecular biologists at UT Southwestern Medical Center were able to uncover a new mechanism that choreographs a complex molecular dance by applying the latest in gene editing technology combined with a traditional method of making a microRNA target produce a fluorescent green protein. Show More Summary

How do people choose what plants to use?

(Faculty of Science - University of Copenhagen) There are about 400,000 species of plants in the world. Humans use approximately 10-15% of them to cover our basic needs, such as food, medicine and shelter, as well as other needs, such as recreation, art, and craft. But why and how have humans selected only a small fraction of all plants to utilize?

Online media use shows strong genetic influence

(King's College London) Online media use such as social networking and gaming could be strongly influenced by our genes, according to a new study by researchers from King's College London.

Transport yourself to the bustling reefs of Baja with our...

Transport yourself to the bustling reefs of Baja with our newest live cam: the Coral Reef Cam! This colorful neighborhood is home to many species of tropical fish, including the Cortez wrasse, scrawled filefish and Cortez angelfish. Reefs are among the most diverse and valuable ecosystems on Earth. Show More Summary

New research on wine fermentation could lead to better bouquet

The taste of wine arises from a symphony of compounds that are assembled as yeast ferment the must from grapes. But much of what happens in this process remains obscure. Now a team of researchers from France, a country that is synonymous...Show More Summary

Crop achilles' heel costs farmers 10 percent of potential yield

Scientists assumed leaves at the top of a plant would be the best at turning higher levels of light into carbohydrates—through the process of photosynthesis—while the lower shaded leaves would be better at processing the low light levels that penetrate the plant's canopy of leaves. Show More Summary

How do people choose what plants to use?

There are about 400,000 species of plants in the world. Humans use approximately 10-15% of them to cover our basic needs, such as food, medicine and shelter, as well as other needs, such as recreation, art, and craft. But why and how...Show More Summary

Exotic black holes caught turning into a superfluid

A model of a higher-dimensional black hole matches what happens when liquid helium loses all its stickiness, a coincidence that could help study both oddities

Trump ditched Obama’s climate and water policies on first day

White House signals intention to cancel Obama’s Climate Action Plan and expand oil and gas exploration

Spanish scientists create a 3-D bioprinter to print human skin

(Carlos III University of Madrid) Scientists from the Universidad Carlos III de Madrid (UC3M), CIEMAT (Center for Energy, Environmental and Technological Research), Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón, in collaboration with...Show More Summary

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