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These Fins Are Made For Walking

The sea robin looks nothing like a robin -- or anything else, really. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Red carpets and deadly toxins go hand in hand

Awards season demands complexion perfection: no wonder some stars turn to a toxin seven million times more poisonous than cobra venom Awards season is fast accelerating towards its glamorous peak, the Oscars. It will be a fabulous evening of gorgeous gowns and flawless complexions. Show More Summary

Study shows ancient humans arrived in South America in multiple waves

(University at Buffalo) The findings published Wednesday (Feb. 22, 2017) in the journal Science Advances suggest that Paleoamericans share a last common ancestor with modern native South Americans outside, rather than inside, the Americas...Show More Summary

Biologists expand on more than 150 years of textbook wisdom with a new explanation for wasp mimicry

The masquerade is almost perfect. Certain moths of the subfamily Arctiinae are marked with a yellow and black pattern. But these day-active insects have wasp waists and their antennae resemble those of wasps. Their transparent wings are folded in a wasp-like way. Show More Summary

New algorithm identifies gene transfers between different bacterial species

Gene transfers are particularly common in the antibiotic-resistance genes of Streptococcus pneumoniae bacteria.

How proteins reshape cell membranes

Small "bubbles" frequently form on membranes of cells and are taken up into their interior. The process involves EHD proteins - a focus of research by Prof. Oliver Daumke of the MDC. He and his team have now shed light on how these proteins assemble on the surface of a cell and reshape its membrane.

How proteins reshape cell membranes

(Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine in the Helmholtz Association) Small 'bubbles' frequently form on membranes of cells and are taken up into their interior. The process involves EHD proteins -- a focus of research by Prof. Oliver Daumke of the MDC. He and his team have now shed light on how these proteins assemble on the surface of a cell and reshape its membrane.

Funding for study which could lead to new drug treatment for dementia diseases

(University of Plymouth) Scientists from Plymouth University Peninsula Schools of Medicine and Dentistry (PUPSMD) have received funding of more than £58,500 from BRACE, a charity which supports research into Alzheimer's disease, forShow More Summary

Resist Protest Event in Minnesota Draws Huge Crowd, Ignored By Press

Last night, I went to an event, apparently organized by an indivisible group, in Plymouth Mass. Plymouth is in Minnesota’s 3rd Congressional District, and is represented by Congressman Erik Paulsen. Paulsen took over, years ago, from a “reasonable Republican” that even Democrats in CD03 remember fondly. But Paulsen has quietly and without fanfare served as…

Hammerhead shark migration gives new hope for conservation

(Frontiers) Great Hammerhead sharks have been tagged and tracked across the USA and Bahamas in a bid to shed light on their migration habits. Researchers suggest that these sharks are more at risk than previously thought because of their predictable and seasonal migratory patterns. Show More Summary

In enemy garb

(University of Freiburg) Biologists expand on more than 150 years of textbook wisdom with a new explanation for wasp mimicry.

Size matters... and structure too! New tool predicts the interaction of proteins and RNA

(Center for Genomic Regulation) Researchers at the Centre for Genomic Regulation developed Global Score, a method that allows, for the first time, to predict protein interactions with long non-coding RNAs. This algorithm helps scientists...Show More Summary

Early baleen whales contended for title of ocean's Barry White

Until now, it has been a bit of a mystery about the evolution of hearing capabilities in those graceful ocean behemoths, the baleen whales.

Scientists generate a new plasmid-based reverse genetics system for rotaviruses

Rotaviruses are the most common cause of severe diarrhea and kill hundreds of thousands of infants a year. Although current vaccines are effective in preventing aggravation of rotaviruses, the development of more effective vaccines at lower cost is expected. Show More Summary

High levels of chemicals found in indoor cats

A study from Stockholm University have now established what was previously suspected, that the high levels of brominated flame retardants measured in cats are from the dust in our homes. The study has been published in the journal Environmental Science & Technology.

Size matters... and structure too: New tool predicts the interaction of proteins with long non-coding RNAs

Far from just reading the information contained in the human genome, and in order to fully understand how it works, researchers aim to know the ins and outs of all the elements in this tiny regulated gear. Many laboratories, consortia and projects are devoted to get a global view of the functional regions of the genome and to know in which cell types genes are active.

Tiny mutation makes plants less resistant to stressful conditions

Scientists from The University of Western Australia have identified a tiny mutation in plants that can influence how well a plant recovers from stressful conditions, and ultimately impact a plant's survival.

Researchers describe how sperm can lose their way

Sperm tails are actually complex propellant and navigational devices that help push them through fluids and navigate around complex terrain of the female oviduct. Now researchers at Yale and Harvard Universities have identified a key component of this navigational system which, when disabled, greatly reduces male fertility.

Video: Project aims to eliminate 'ugly' sweet potatoes

Sweet potatoes are one of the most important food crops in the world, but variations in shape and size can cause farmers to leave entire fields unharvested.

Study of transnational flows of rhino horn

Kruger National Park and other public and private game reserves have become battlefields where state security forces and game wardens fight for the rhinos' survival. Despite their efforts, conservative estimates give rhinos another seven years before they go extinct in the wild. Annette Hübschle is carrying out research into why the protection of rhinos is failing.

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