All Blogs / Academics / Biology / Popular


Convergent evolution of mimetic butterflies confounds classification

David Lohman, associate professor of biology at The City College of New York's Division of Science, is co-author of a landmark paper on butterflies "An illustrated checklist of the genus Elymnias Hübner, 1818 (Nymphalidae, Satyrinae)."...Show More Summary

Perth's urban sprawl affecting sex life of plants

A Perth researcher is using CSI-style paternity testing in the lab to track pollen and measure how much the urban sprawl is affecting plants ability to reproduce.

New nerve degeneration molecule identified

A discovery in a transparent roundworm has brought scientists one step closer to understanding why nerves degenerate.

Bats anticipate optimal weather conditions

Millions of animals fly, swim or walk around the Earth every year. To ensure that they reach their destination, they need to perceive precise changes in environmental conditions and choose the right moment to set off on their journey. Show More Summary

Ricin only lethal in combination with sugar

The plant toxin ricin is one of the most poisonous naturally occurring proteins, making it an extremely dangerous bioweapon. Ricin attacks have made headlines a number of times over the years, including the spectacular "umbrella murder" in London in the 1970s, or the ricin letters addressed to Barack Obama in 2014. There is no antidote.

A study switches from genetic to metabolic analysis to reconstitute evolutionary process

With 72 species currently identified, Espeletia is a plant genus endemic to the paramo, a moist alpine biome unique to the northern Andes. This genus, which inhabits the world's most diverse high-altitude ecosystem, is an outstanding example of adaptive success.

Casting into the past helps reveal fishing's future

Intensive fishing and climate change pose an unprecedented threat to biodiversity in the world's oceans, but reconstructing how the past 500 years of human activity on the seas has transformed marine life could help to reveal what the future holds beneath the waves.

California condor takes flight in wild after near extinction

In a remote, rugged valley overlooking the Pacific Ocean, researchers closely monitor an endangered icon: the California condor.

Dissolution of abiogenic and biogenic calcium carbonate under ocean acidification conditions

Under ocean acidification conditions, the chemistry of the seawater will change including a decrease in pH, a decrease in carbonate ion concentration and a decrease in the calcium carbonate saturation state of the water (?). This has implications for solid marine calcium carbonates including calcifying organisms and carbonate sediments. Show More Summary

Foundation to create special reserve for albino orangutan

A conservation group in Indonesia says it wants to create a 5-hectare "forest island" for the world's only known albino orangutan after rescuing it from villagers earlier this year.

Could condors return to northern California?

In 2003, Northern California's Yurok Tribe initiated efforts to reintroduce California Condors on their lands. While wild condors have not existed in the region for more than a hundred years, a new study from The Condor: Ornithological Applications suggests that hunters transitioning from lead to non-lead ammunition may allow these apex scavengers to succeed there once again.

Social environment matters for duck penis size

Most birds lack genitalia, but male ducks are known for their long, spiraling penises, which have evolved through an ongoing cat-and-mouse game with females. A new study from The Auk: Ornithological Advances looks at whether these impressive...Show More Summary

This dance is taken: Hundreds of male frog species change colors around mating time

Some of nature's most vibrant colors occur in frogs, who peek out from rainforests and marshes in startling shades of blue, yellow and red. But for hundreds of species, only males flaunt flashy colors—and sometimes only for a few hours, days or weeks each year.

How do human impacts on wetlands affect animals?

(Wiley) A new Biological Reviews study provides a comprehensive assessment of how changes to wetlands affect animals, and the authors use their findings to provide recommendations for managing wetlands to maximise their biodiversity...

This dance is taken: Hundreds of male frog species change colors around mating time

(Smithsonian) Some of nature's most vibrant colors occur in frogs, who peek out from rainforests and marshes in startling shades of blue, yellow and red. But for hundreds of species, only males flaunt flashy colors -- and sometimes only for a few hours, days or weeks each year. Show More Summary

'They want a devout generation': how education in Turkey is changing

As pupils begin their new school year, they will find evolution removed from texts and less time spent on Atatürk’s secular ideals After 25 years of teaching, Ay?e Kazanc? decided to retire early. The social sciences teacher, who asked...Show More Summary

Fish may use different behaviors to protect against parasites

New research indicates that fish may adapt their behaviour to defend against parasite infection. The findings are published in the Journal of Zoology.

Vintage Dinosaur Art: How Tough was a Tyrannosaurus?

The Q&A format is a very popular one for children's dinosaur books, and indeed I've covered a few during my invaluably spent time writing for LITC. However, this one's a little special, and that's because it was sent to me by long-time reader Herman Diaz via airmail, all the way from the US. Show More Summary

Too few antibiotics in pipeline to tackle global drug-resistance crisis, WHO warns

Nowhere near enough new drugs are currently in development says report, which calls for urgent investment and responsible use of existing antibiotics Too few antibiotics are in the pipeline to tackle the global crisis of drug resistance,...Show More Summary

Western cities try to stop hungry bears from causing havoc

On a recent morning that was chilly with the first nip of fall, Brenda Lee went looking for knocked-over trash cans. She drove her car slowly through alleyways on the west side of this Colorado city, close to where streets end and the Rocky Mountains begin. The damage wasn't hard to find.

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC