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Novel regulatory mechanism controls how plants defend themselves against pathogens

Together with collaborators in Austria, scientists at The Sainsbury Laboratory (TSL) in Norwich (UK) are unravelling the complex mechanisms underlying plants' innate abilities to resist pests and pathogens. In a new paper published in Science, the team reveals how a class of endogenous plant peptides and their corresponding receptor regulate plant immune responses.

We pelican make a difference for the planet! From facing...

We pelican make a difference for the planet! From facing extinction in the 1970s to their daily fly-bys of the Aquarium, brown pelicans recovered thanks to political pressure by concerned citizens. If you need any ocean optimism hope, it’s the thing with feathers.

New book explores why the discovery of sex in plants took so long

(University of California - Santa Cruz) Sexual reproduction in animals has been recognized since ancient times and used in the breeding of domesticated animals for more than 10,000 years. For most of that time, however, there was no intentional breeding of crop plants because people didn't think plants had sex. Show More Summary

Curb your immune enthusiasm

(Salk Institute) Salk scientists discover how to prevent undesirable immune attacks on therapeutic viruses

Roots of related genetic diseases found in cell powerhouses

(NYU Langone Medical Center / New York University School of Medicine) Scientists at NYU Langone Medical Center have discovered the mechanisms behind a genetic change known to cause a set of related diseases.

New book explores why the discovery of sex in plants took so long

Sexual reproduction in animals has been recognized since ancient times and used in the breeding of domesticated animals for more than 10,000 years. Humans have depended on domesticated crops for more than 10,000 years as well, but for most of that time there was no intentional breeding of crop plants because people didn't think plants had sex.

Balance may rely on the timing of movement

Zebrafish learn to balance by darting forward when they feel wobbly, a principle that may also apply to humans, according to a study led by researchers at NYU Langone Medical Center.

Ants use sun and memories to guide their backwards walk home

They are famed for their highly developed work ethic... now a study shows ants' navigational skills are more sophisticated than was previously thought.

Moth gut bacterium defends its host by making antibiotic

Nearly half of all insects are herbivores, but their diets do not consist of only plant material. It is not uncommon for potentially harmful microorganisms to slip in during a feast. In a study published on January 19 in Cell Chemical Biology, researchers report that these insects use an ironic strategy to resist microbial infections. Show More Summary

Abortion rate halves if women have to go extra 100 miles

A law that closed many abortion clinics in Texas has led to a drop in the rate of abortions. On average, the nearest clinic is now 80 kilometres further away

Stare into the Soulful Eyes of this Newly Discovered Dwarf Lemur Species

The Ankarana dwarf lemur weighs about as much as a banana and lives in a highly restricted habitat -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Regional sea-level scenarios will help Northeast plan for faster-than-global rise

(Rutgers University) Sea level in the Northeast and in some other US regions will rise significantly faster than the global average, according to a report released by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. In a worst-case...Show More Summary

Quality control inside the cell

(Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin) The ability to dispose of proteins that are either aberrant or (in the worst case) toxic is fundamental to a cell's survival. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been able...Show More Summary

New theory may explain mystery of Fairy Circles of Namibia

(University of Strathclyde) One of nature's greatest mysteries -- the 'Fairy Circles' of Namibia -- may have been unraveled by researchers at the University of Strathclyde and Princeton University.

Global threat to primates concerns us all

(Deutsches Primatenzentrum (DPZ)/German Primate Center) In cooperation with an international team of experts, scientists from the German Primate Center demand immediate measures to protect primates.

'Marine repairmen'—new research shows limpets are construction workers of the seashore

New research from a beach-roaming biomechanics engineer paints a surprisingly industrious picture of limpets—the marine snails that are abundantly plastered on rocks at low tide. His work shows that limpets survive and thrive by being the busy construction workers of the seashore.

Quality control inside the cell

The ability to dispose of proteins that are either aberrant or (in the worst case) toxic is fundamental to a cell's survival. Researchers from Charité - Universitätsmedizin Berlin have been able to demonstrate the manner in which two...Show More Summary

Foxes may confuse predators by rubbing themselves in puma scent

Gray foxes in the mountains of California rub in the scent of pumas, possibly to absorb their smell and confuse predators to give themselves a chance to run

CRISPR meets single-cell sequencing in new screening method

Genome editing using CRISPR/Cas9 "gene scissors" is a powerful tool for biological discovery and for identifying novel drug targets. In pooled CRISPR screens, a large number of cells are edited simultaneously using CRISPR guide-RNAs against thousands of different genes. Show More Summary

Molecule flash mob

Neurotransmitter transporters are some of the most popular transport proteins in research as they play a major role in the processing of signals in the brain. A joint study by TU Wien and the Medical University of Vienna has now successfully demonstrated for the first time the structural impact of membrane lipids on medically relevant serotonin transporters.

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