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Hypertension treatment for females starts with how a high-salt diet affects their blood pressure

(Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University) Many of us have noted how our hands and feet swell after eating too much salt. Now scientists are exploring how high salt intake can also make cells throughout the body of females swell, rupture, dump their contents and die, triggering an immune reaction that contributes to chronic high blood pressure.

New insights into the information processing of motor neurons

(Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience) Scientists at Max Planck Florida Institute for Neuroscience are working to understand how neurons in the cerebellum, a region in the back of the brain that controls movement, interact with each other. Show More Summary

University of Toronto study uncovers gene that may strongly influence obesity

(University of Toronto) A University of Toronto study on fruit flies has uncovered a gene that could play a key role in obesity in humans. The paper published online this month in Genetics examines a 'foraging gene' humans share in common...Show More Summary

Scientists unlock ability to generate new sensory hair cells

(Brigham and Women's Hospital) Scientists describe a technique to grow large quantities of inner ear progenitor cells that convert into hair cells.

Counting sharks

(University of California - Santa Barbara) Researchers recalibrate shark population density using data they gathered during eight years of study on Palmyra atoll.

Science vs. the sea lamprey

(Concordia University) Concordia biology professor Grant Brown has developed a promising -- and natural -- solution to curb destructive the sea lamprey population.

Entomological Society of America supports the March for Science

(Entomological Society of America) The Entomological Society of America (ESA) endorses the March for Science to be held on April 22. The stated goals and principles of the March for Science align closely with the strategic principles of ESA.

pbsnature:Dolphin teenagers are the worst! Tune in Wednesday for...

pbsnature: Dolphin teenagers are the worst! Tune in Wednesday for an all new episode of #SpyintheWildPBS.  Excellent underwater reporting by ???????? and ????????.

Researchers recalibrate shark population density using data they gathered during eight years of study on Palmyra atoll

Many shark populations around the world are known to have declined over the past several decades, yet marine scientists lack important baseline information about what a healthy shark population looks like. A clearer picture is now coming into focus—thanks to a team of scientists who investigated the size of an unfished community of reef sharks.

Science vs. the sea lamprey

Of all the fishy predators in the Great Lakes, few are more destructive than the sea lamprey. There's something of a horror movie in their approach: jawless, they attach to prey such as salmon, whitefish or trout with a sucker mouth and drain the victim of its blood and lymph.

Study details ringed structure of ORC in DNA replication

An international collaboration of life scientists, including experts at Van Andel Research Institute, has described in exquisite detail the critical first steps of DNA replication, which allows cells to divide and most advanced life, including human, to propagate.

Exercise reduces death from breast cancer relapse by 40 per cent

A quarter of women with breast cancer will die from cancer spreading around the body – exercise is the most important lifestyle factor in preventing this

ORC as Loader of the Rings

(Van Andel Research Institute) An international collaboration of life scientists, including experts at Van Andel Research Institute, has described in exquisite detail the critical first steps of DNA replication, which allows cells to divide and most advanced life, including human, to propagate.

Prides, protection & parks: Africa's protected areas can support 4 times as many lions

(Panthera) Africa's protected parks and reserves are capable of supporting three to four times as many wild lions if well funded and managed, according to a new report led by Panthera, the global wild cat conservation organization. Published...Show More Summary

What's the healthiest way to eat your veggies? (video)

(American Chemical Society) Vegetables are chock-full of essential vitamins and minerals, but how should you eat them to get the most nutritious bang for your buck? Raw? Sauteed? Frozen? Watch the latest Reactions episode to find out how you can use chemistry to get the most out of your veggies: https://youtu.be/6hFxSJcq-KU.

Researchers document second case of 'Down syndrome' in chimps

(Springer) Japanese researchers have confirmed the second case known to science of a chimpanzee born with trisomy 22, a chromosomal defect similar to that of Down syndrome (or trisomy 21) in humans. The report1 on Kanako, a 24-year-old...Show More Summary

New technique generates high volume of sensory cells needed for hearing

(Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary) In 2013, Mass. Eye and Ear researchers restored partial hearing to mice by converting stem cells into hair cells. However, the success of this approach was limited by the small number of stem cells in the ear. Show More Summary

Scientists present the smallest member of the CRISPR-Cas9 family developed to date

Scientists at the Center for Genome Engineering, within the Institute for Basic Science (IBS), in collaboration with KIM Eunji (ToolGen Inc.) and KIM Jeong Hun (Seoul National University) have engineered the smallest CRISPR-Cas9 to date,...Show More Summary

Cutting-edge cameras reveal the secret life of dolphins

A world-first study testing new underwater cameras on wild dolphins has given researchers the best view yet into their hidden marine world.

Shellfish Bearing Tusks? It Happened

500 million years ago, such creatures were part of the community of oddballs famously found in today's Burgess Shale -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

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