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2-12-17 A Tribute to Granny J-2

Sunday, February 12th...today the Town of Friday Harbor and The Whale Museum held a tribute to Granny J-2....knowing that many people who knew Granny but live far away would not be able to attend, and because of requests by some...I remade the slide show into a movie so I could put it on my blog. Show More Summary

Pig People?

When Medscape asked me late last week to cover the making of early embryos that have cells from pigs and humans, I couldn’t help but flash back to the pigman episode of Seinfeld. “The government’s been experimenting with

How do bone-eating worms eat bones?

The deep-sea Osedax bone-devouring worms could easily have been the poster child for Deep-Sea News instead of the Giant Squid.    I love them because Osedax these little soft sacks resemble snotty little flowers.  Perhaps that’s why the first named species got the Latin name of Osedax mucofloris, literally bone devouring mucus flower. The females are all […]

12 Alternative Facts of Human Genetics

I’ve always wanted to write about my favorite experiment in human genetics, but a news hook was elusive. Not any more! Thank you Kellyanne Conway for your intriguing concept of “alternative facts.” I’m writing the 12th

The Guardian view on education: it’s not all in the genes

Our educational attainment and when we have children is determined a little by chromosomes but much more by social and environmental conditions Human intelligence quite obviously has some genetic component. Genes do constrain our fate, as does luck, even if development matters more. Show More Summary

seafoodwatch: Seafood Watch’s Big Moments of 2016 Being a bunch of scientists, we here at Seafood...

seafoodwatch: Seafood Watch’s Big Moments of 2016 Being a bunch of scientists, we here at Seafood Watch usually channel our inner Vulcan and keep emotion out of it. We’re pretty proud, though, about a few things that happened this year. Show More Summary

Genetics in 2016: Breakthrough, Breakdown, and Bridge

I dislike end-of-year “best of” lists, especially the “breakthroughs” that imply scientific discoveries and medical advances emerge from out of nowhere. Often they’re the product of PR machines that select and then catapult certain research

Big wave story is big

I imagine somewhere there is a cold-war era control room in a deep bunker where an alarm bell starts ringing every time a giant ocean wave is detected. When the  World Meteorological Association announced there was a new record holder for the World’s biggest wave recorded by a buoy, I immediately scrambled for more info! A lone buoy deployed by […]

A Decade of Deep Sea Decadence

Today is legendary! Why, you ask? Well, we are celebrating TEN YEARS of DSN posts. That’s right – if you go wayyyyyyyyy back in the archives you will note that the proto-Deep Sea News empire began with a little post by Dr. M on December 13, 2006. What were we all doing in 2006? Well […]

Linking Gaucher and Parkinson’s Diseases

This month, JScreen’s “Spit Happens” campaign is covering all costs not met by insurance for testing for carrier status for Gaucher disease, thanks to funding from the National Gaucher Foundation. The “spit happens” video is an entertaining view

Parent Roundtable: Before and After Gene Therapy

I dedicate this post – my 200th here at DNA Science – to the rare disease families I’ve met since starting this blog four years ago. You are all amazing! As the lame duck Congress

npr: kqedscience: Jellyfish have survived five mass...

npr: kqedscience: Jellyfish have survived five mass extinctions and manage to live in every ocean. They are the ultimate survivors.  Watch the latest Deep Look video, brought to you by kqedscience and pbsdigitalstudios. Take a break from election and watch this video about jellies. -Emily Brainless, spineless, heartless and outlived the dinosaurs.

montereybayaquarium: Try as she might, MacKenzie Bubel just...

montereybayaquarium: Try as she might, MacKenzie Bubel just couldn’t satisfy the baby comb jellies. The aquarist was attempting to spawn a species called Mnemiopsis leidyi—a ghostly-looking little creature native to the Gulf of Mexico—in the Aquarium’s Jelly Lab. Show More Summary

Harold Hillman obituary

My brother Harold Hillman, who has died aged 85, was a biological scientist whose research had application in resuscitation, animal slaughter, execution techniques and the use of electric stun guns. He found that the lives of peopleShow More Summary

Microscopic world: RPS Scientific Imaging Award 2016 – in pictures

From the parasitic ‘fairy fly’ to paracetamol as you’ve never seen before, Spike Walker, winner of Royal Photographic Society’s new award, shines a light on the hidden world of microscopic forms and structures Continue reading...

Robopocalypse Report #90

Drones: The US laws and regulations for commercial drones are now in effect.The FAA expects as a result that 600k commercial drones will be in the air by year's end. Domino's delivered its first pizzas by drone. Google has partnered with Chipolte to test delivery of burritos via drone. Show More Summary

3 Gene Therapy Trials Report Good News

Here’s an update on some of the rare disease families DNA Science has covered as they travel the long and winding road from diagnosis to gene therapy. The Challenge The rarity of many single-gene diseases

skunkbear: skunkbear: You can learn more about this immortal...

skunkbear: skunkbear: You can learn more about this immortal animal in our latest video. An update to the chart - this fish (a Greenland shark): Reaches sexual maturity at 150 years - and lives to be at least 272 years old. That’s older...Show More Summary

Have you been watching Okeanos explorer? If not, this week is your chance!

I’m kind of obsessed with Okeanos Explorer. Why? Because being able to watch a live feed of an ROV exploring the deep ocean on the TV in my living room is pretty amazing. THE FUTURE IS NOW PEOPLE. Okeanos Explorer is a NOAA boat whose sole business is ocean exploration. It uses two ROVs equipped with mega […]

Try as she might, MacKenzie Bubel just couldn’t satisfy the baby...

Try as she might, MacKenzie Bubel just couldn’t satisfy the baby comb jellies. The aquarist was attempting to spawn a species called Mnemiopsis leidyi—a ghostly-looking little creature native to the Gulf of Mexico—in the Aquarium’s Jelly Lab. Show More Summary

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