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RIT researchers win USGS grant to improve Landsat 8 data

(Rochester Institute of Technology) Rochester Institute of Technology researchers have won funding from the US Geological Survey to ensure accurate temperature data from NASA's Landsat 8 satellite. The agency awarded Aaron Gerace and Matthew Montanaro, senior scientists in RIT's Chester F. Show More Summary

How do plants make oxygen? Ask cyanobacteria

(California Institute of Technology) A new study adds 41 new types of cyanobacteria, and helps pin down when in history they 'invented' oxygen-producing photosynthesis.

'Fuzzy' fibers can take rockets' heat

(Rice University) Rice University scientists collaborate with NASA to improve its composite materials for next-generation rocket engines by adding a 'fuzzy' silicon carbide fiber.

Proteins that can take the heat

Ancient proteins may offer clues on how to engineer proteins that can withstand the high temperatures required in industrial applications, according to new research published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Researchers...Show More Summary

Researchers reveal atomic-level activity of green catalyst used in PVC production

An international group of scientists has unlocked the secret of a gold-based catalyst that is responsible for a new, environmentally friendly method of producing the vinyl chloride monomer (VCM) that is used to manufacture polyvinyl chloride (PVC), the world's third-most widely used plastic.

Researchers reveal atomic-level activity of green catalyst used in PVC production

(Lehigh University) UK-U.S. group reports in Science that individual ions of gold dispersed on a carbon support are the ideal catalytic species for converting acetylene, a gas derived from coal, into the molecule used to manufacture PVC. The discovery comes amid international efforts to phase out acetylene conversion, which relies on a mercury-containing catalyst.

Sculpting optical microstructures with slight changes in chemistry

(Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences) In 2013, materials scientists at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS) and the Wyss Institute of Biologically Inspired Engineering, grew a garden of self-assembled crystal microstructures. Show More Summary

Rotating molecules create a brighter future

Scientists have discovered a group of materials which could pave the way for a new generation of high-efficiency lighting, solving a quandary which has inhibited the performance of display technology for decades. The development of energy...Show More Summary

Newly characterized protein has potential to save US farmers millions annually

(Carl R. Woese Institute for Genomic Biology, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign) Instead of turning carbon into food, many plants accidentally make a plant-toxic compound during photosynthesis that is recycled through a process called photorespiration. Show More Summary

Search for stellar survivor of a supernova explosion

(ESA/Hubble Information Centre) Astronomers have used the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope to observe the remnant of a supernova explosion in the Large Magellanic Cloud. Beyond just delivering a beautiful image, Hubble may well have traced the surviving remains of the exploded star's companion.

Built from the bottom up, nanoribbons pave the way to 'on-off' states for graphene

(DOE/Oak Ridge National Laboratory) A new way to grow narrow ribbons of graphene, a lightweight and strong structure of single-atom-thick carbon atoms linked into hexagons, may address a shortcoming that has prevented the material from achieving its full potential in electronic applications. Show More Summary

Mysterious cosmic explosion surprises astronomers studying the distant x-ray universe

(Penn State) A mysterious flash of X-rays has been discovered by NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory in the deepest X-ray image ever obtained. This source likely comes from some sort of destructive event, but it may be of a variety that scientists have never seen before.

Engineer patents waterlike polymer to create high-temperature ceramics

Ceramic textiles, improved jet engine blades, 3-D printed ceramics and better batteries may soon become a reality, thanks to a recently patented polymer from a Kansas State University engineer.

CARB-X injects up to $48 million to accelerate first Powered by CARB-X projects

(Boston University) The Combating Antibiotic Resistant Bacteria Biopharmaceutical Accelerator, or CARB-X (www.carb-x.org), announced today it is investing US $24 million immediately and up to $24 million in milestone-based additional payments over three years to help 11 biotech companies and research teams in the U.S. Show More Summary

Researchers watch blood vessels develop in whole Zebrafish embryos

(The Optical Society) For the first time, researchers have followed the development of blood vessels in zebrafish embryos without using any labels or contrast agents, which may disturb the biological processes under study.

What happens in the living cell?

(Wiley) The plasma membrane serves as a major hub for signal cascades to control crucial cellular processes. But it is a fluidmedium, which makes the signaling processes difficult to monitor. Now, German scientists have designed a molecular'paintbrush' technique to trigger, control, and also monitor signaling processes. Show More Summary

Method identified to boost detection of highly cancerous stem cells

(Tokyo Medical and Dental University) Tokyo Medical and Dental University (TMDU)-led researchers discovered a subpopulation of highly cancerous stem cells in a brain cancer cell line. The cells are not identified by standard tumor cell fluorescence detection methods. Show More Summary

Emissions from the edge of the forest

(Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research - UFZ) Half of the carbon stored in all of the Earth's vegetation is contained in tropical forests. Deforestation has a correspondingly fatal effect. Scientists estimate that this releases 1,000 million tonnes of carbon every year, which, in the form of greenhouse gasses, drives up global temperatures. Show More Summary

'Molecular activity painting' to control and monitor switch-like, light-controlled perturbations inside cells

The plasma membrane serves as a major hub for signal cascades to control crucial cellular processes. But it is a fluid medium, which makes the signaling processes difficult to monitor. Now, German scientists have designed a molecular "paintbrush" technique to trigger, control, and also monitor signaling processes. Show More Summary

The beginning of the end of order

(University of Konstanz) Classical physics states that a crystal consists of perfectly ordered particles from a continuous symmetrical atomic structure. The Mermin-Wagner theorem from 1966 broke with this view: it states that in one-dimensional...Show More Summary

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