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Ants to the rescue: How super-organisms could become super pest controllers

As global population rises and finite resources dwindle, farmers need new, more sustainable ways to control pests. Now, ecologists have found a safe, sustainable and cost-effective new pest control. But rather than a high-tech compound or genetic technology, it's a tiny, low-tech organism: the ant.

A single cocaine dose lowers perceptions of sadness and anger

A single dose of cocaine can interfere with the ability to recognize negative emotions such as anger and sadness, according to new research.

Scientists show how magnetic pulses change the brain in treatment for depressed patients

A group of scientists have found a way of understanding how transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) can give relief to severely depressed patients. TMS is used as an alternative to electro-convulsive therapy, but it is not known how it achieves its therapeutic effect. Show More Summary

How can we prevent suicide? Major study shows risk factors associated with depression

A major multi-national study of suicides has identified the behavior patterns which precede many suicide attempts. This may lead to changes in clinical practice in the care of patients affected with depression, as it shows the clinical factors which confer major risk of suicide attempts.

Discarded electronics mismanaged within Europe equals about 10 times the volume of e-waste exported

Mismanagement of discarded electronics within Europe involves a volume 10 times that of e-waste shipped to foreign shores in undocumented exports, according to a comprehensive two-year investigation into the functioning of the used and waste electronics market.

Treating left atrial appendage could dampen long standing persistent atrial fibrillation

In patients with long-standing persistent atrial fibrillation (AF) despite standard treatment, additional electrical isolation of an area called the left atrial appendage (LAA) can improve freedom from AF without increasing complications, results of the BELIEF study show.

Rapid, more sensitive test speeds up chest pain triage

Patients arriving at the emergency department with chest pain suggestive of acute myocardial infarction (AMI) can be triaged more quickly and more safely using a new rapid assay with refined cut-offs, research suggests.

Surprise cardiac finding predicts future risk

In patients with chronic ischemic heart disease, a small left ventricle with thick walls, is the strongest predictor of morphologic remodelling, which is generally considered a first step towards heart failure, according to unexpected findings.

Leadless Pacemaker Study Assesses Safety and Efficacy

A leadless cardiac pacemaker showed “good safety and reliable function” during the initial six months of follow-up in the LEADLESS II study, investigators reported.

Cold weather linked to increased stroke risk in atrial fibrillation patients

Cold weather is associated with increased risk of ischaemic stroke in patients with atrial fibrillation, according to new research. The study in nearly 290,000 patients suggests that cool climate may be an underrated issue for health that deserves more attention.

Recruitment of leukocytes is a hallmark of stent thrombosis

Recruitment of leukocytes is a hallmark of stent thrombosis, according to new results. The findings suggest that immune cell mediated thrombotic processes may be a realistic target for novel therapies to prevent stent thrombosis.

Cold weather associated with higher risk of severe heart attack

Cold weather is associated with a higher risk of severe heart attack, according to new research. The six year study found that each 10°C drop in temperature was associated with a 7% increased risk of ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI), the most severe form of heart attack.

Refractory cardiac arrest patients brought to hospital with ongoing CPR can recover

Refractory cardiac arrest patients brought to hospital with ongoing cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) can survive with good brain function, according to research in nearly 4,000 patients.

Pollution and weather influence outcomes after heart attack

Pollution and weather influence outcomes after a heart attack, according to new research.

Prolonged television watchers have higher risk of fatal pulmonary embolism

Prolonged television watchers have a higher risk of fatal pulmonary embolism, a condition associated with long haul flights, reveals research.

Coffee linked with increased cardiovascular risk in young adults with mild hypertension

Coffee drinking is associated with increased risk of cardiovascular events (mainly heart attacks) in young adults (18-45) with mild hypertension.The 12-year study in more than 1,200 patients found that heavy coffee drinkers had a four-fold increased risk while moderate drinkers tripled their risk.

Surface plasmons move at nearly the speed of light and travel farther than expected, possibly leading to faster electronic circuits

Light waves trapped on a metal's surface travel farther than expected. While the distance might seem quite small, it is far enough to possibly be useful in ultra-fast electronic circuits.

Combustion’s Mysterious 'QOOH' Radicals Exposed

Good news for those interested in accurately modeling combustion engines, scientists can now discriminate between previously unidentified radicals found in the early stages of the combustion process from similar compounds.

Better signs could help reduce friction between motorists, bicyclists

A survey shows 'Bicycles May Use Full Lane' signs are better at communicating bicyclists' right to use the roadway.

New 'Tissue Velcro' could help repair damaged hearts

Engineers have just made assembling functional heart tissue as easy as fastening your shoes. The team has created a biocompatible scaffold that allows sheets of beating heart cells to snap together just like Velcro.

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