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CDC and Texas Health Department confirm first Ebola case diagnosed in the U.S.

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed today, through laboratory tests, the first case of Ebola to be diagnosed in the United States in a person who had traveled to Dallas, Texas from Liberia. The patient did not have symptoms when leaving West Africa, but developed symptoms approximately four days after arriving in the U.S. on Sept. 20.

Ultrafast remote switching of light emission

The researchers etched a photonic crystal around several quantum dots in a semiconductor layer. Quantum dots are small structures that spontaneously emit light as a consequence of atomic processes. If a short laser pulse is fired atShow More Summary

New Horizon Spacecraft Racing Towards the "Unexplored Planet" --"Could Have Astrobiological Potential"

“Humankind hasn't had an experience like this--an encounter with a new planet--in a long time,” he Alan Stern, of the Southwest Research Institute and the mission’s principal investigator. “Everything we see on Pluto will be a revelation.” One of the...

Myriad presents tumor BRACAnalysis CDx study at ESMO

SALT LAKE CITY, Utah, Sept. 29, 2014 – Myriad Genetics, Inc. (Nasdaq: MYGN) today announced that its Tumor BRACAnalysis CDx™ companion diagnostic test significantly improved the detection of cancer-causing BRCA1/2 mutations by 44 percent in women with ovarian cancer. Show More Summary

Understanding Greenland Ice Sheet's meltwater channels

Observations of moulins (vertical conduits connecting water on top of the glacier down to the bed of the ice sheet) and boreholes in Greenland show that subglacial channels ameliorate the speedup caused by water delivery to the base of the ice sheet in the short term. By mid summer, however, the channels stabilize and are unable to grow any larger.

Hypertension risk rises closer to major roadways

In a newly published analysis, the risk of high blood pressure among 5,400 post-menopausal women was higher the closer they lived to a major roadway. The result, which accounts for a wide variety of possible confounding factors, adds to concerns that traffic exposure may present public health risks.

Spiders: Survival of the fittest group

Researchers have uncovered the first-ever field-based evidence for a biological mechanism called 'group selection' contributing to local adaptation in natural populations. Evolutionary theorists have been debating the existence and power of group selection for decades. Now two scientists have observed it in the wild.

Decreased ability to identify odors can predict death: Olfactory dysfunction is a harbinger of mortality

The inability of older adults to identify scents is a strong predictor of death within five years. Almost 40% of those who failed a smelling test died during that period, compared to 10% of those with a healthy sense of smell. Olfactory dysfunction predicted mortality better than a diagnosis of heart failure or cancer.

Zombieland Sequel in the Works

A Fire Is Lit Under the Powers That Be To Get a Zombieland Sequel Together Film Zombieland Woody Harrelson Jesse Eisenberg

Swirling cloud at Titan's pole is cold and toxic

Scientists analyzing data from NASA's Cassini mission have discovered that a giant, toxic cloud is hovering over the south pole of Saturn's largest moon, Titan, after the atmosphere there cooled dramatically. The scientists found that this giant polar vortex contains frozen particles of the toxic compound hydrogen cyanide, or HCN.

Why wet feels wet: Understanding the illusion of wetness

Though it seems simple, feeling that something is wet is quite a feat because our skin does not have receptors that sense wetness. UK researchers propose that wetness perception is intertwined with our ability to sense cold temperature and tactile sensations such as pressure and texture.

Coral reef winners and losers as water temperatures rise

Contrary to the popular research-based assumption that the world's coral reefs are doomed, a new longitudinal study paints a brighter picture of how corals may fare in the future. A subset of present coral fauna will likely populate oceans as water temperatures continue to rise, researchers have reported.

Intervention helps decrease 'mean girl' behaviors, researchers find

Relational aggression, or 'mean girl' bullying, is a popular subject in news and entertainment media. This nonphysical form of aggression generally used among adolescent girls includes gossiping, rumor spreading, exclusion and rejection. Show More Summary

Treatment of substance abuse can lessen risk of future violence in mentally ill

If a person is dually diagnosed with a severe mental illness and a substance abuse problem, are improvements in their mental health or in their substance abuse most likely to reduce the risk of future violence? A new study suggests that reducing substance abuse has a greater influence in reducing violent acts by patients with severe mental illness.

Predicting impact of climate change on species that can't get out of the way

When scientists talk about the consequences of climate change, it can mean more than how we human beings will be impacted by higher temperatures, rising seas and serious storms. Plants and trees are also feeling the change, but they can't move out of the way. Show More Summary

Hide and seek: Sterile neutrinos remain elusive

Scientists studying the subtle transformations of subatomic particles called neutrinos, is publishing its first results on the search for a so-called sterile neutrino, a possible new type of neutrino beyond the three known neutrino 'flavors,' or types. Show More Summary

New absorber will lead to better biosensors

A new nanostructure absorbs ultranarrow bands of light spectrum and can be used in a number of applications, including the creation of more sensitive biosensors.

Interstellar Is Keeping Film Alive

See Interstellar Early On Celluloid Instead of Digital  Film Interstellar Matthew McConaughey Christopher Nolan Kodak

Solving the mystery of the 'Man in the Moon': Volcanic plume, not an asteroid, likely created the moon's largest basin

New data obtained by NASA's GRAIL mission reveals that the Procellarum region on the near side of the moon -- a giant basin often referred to as the "man in the moon" -- likely arose not from a massive asteroid strike, but from a large plume of magma deep within the moon's interior.

Genetic secrets of the monarch butterfly revealed

Sequencing the genomes of monarch butterflies from around the world, a team of scientists has made surprising new insights into the monarch's genetics. They identified a single gene that appears central to migration -- a behavior generally regarded as complex -- and another that controls pigmentation. The researchers also shed light on the evolutionary origins of the monarch.

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