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Plump turtles swim better: First models of swimming animals

Bigger is better, if you're a leatherback sea turtle. For the first time, researchers have measured the forces that act on a swimming animal and the energy the animal must expend to move through the water.

Watch an Exclusive Interstellar Clip With Matthew McConaughey

Cooper faces some dubious realities in this exclusive first look at Christopher Nolan's space epic Interstellar

Innovative study utilizing video games shows sleep apnea may affect memory of everyday events

Sleep apnea may affect your ability to form new spatial memories, such as remembering where you parked your car, new research suggests. The study demonstrates through the playing of a specific video game that disruption of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep as a consequence of sleep apnea impairs spatial memory in humans even when other sleep stages are intact.

Interstellar, Where No Movie Has Gone Before

A new movie updates the Hollywood space odyssey with a fable based on fact

Low carb, high fat diets may reduce seizures in tough-to-treat epilepsy

Diets high in fat and low in carbohydrates, such as the ketogenic or modified Atkins diet, may reduce seizures in adults with tough-to-treat epilepsy, according to a review of research.

Novel ultrasound technology to screen for heart conditions developed by engineers

Engineers have determined, for the first time, the impact of a ring-shaped vortex on transporting blood flow in normal and abnormal ventricles within the human heart, and have developed a novel ultrasound technology that makes screening cheaper and much easier, making it possible to reach a large number of people and even infants.

The Weather Channel pushes back against John Coleman

The Weather Channel posted this yesterday, no doubt to counter TWC founder John Coleman’s recent Open Letter and appearance on Fox’s Kelly File (several comments make the connection): Global Warming: The Weather Channel Position Statement Introduction The scientific issue of global warming can be broken down into three main questions: Is global warming a reality?…

Ammonium source in open ocean tracked by researchers

To understand the extent to which human activities are polluting Earth's atmosphere and oceans, it's important to distinguish human-made pollutants from compounds that occur naturally. A new study finds that deposition of ammonium, a source of nitrogen pollution, over the open ocean comes mostly from natural marine sources, and not from human activity.

Tiny carbon nanotube pores make big impact

Scientists have created a new kind of ion channel based on short carbon nanotubes, which can be inserted into synthetic bilayers and live cell membranes to form tiny pores that transport water, protons, small ions and DNA. These carbon nanotube "porins" have significant implications for future health care and bioengineering applications.

Sacred Mexican Tunnel Yields 50K Relics

After almost a decade of painstaking work, researchers have unearthed an amazing 50,000 relics from a tunnel in the ancient city of Teotihuacan—and they believe the biggest prizes still await. The tunnel below the site around 30 miles away from Mexico City was discovered in 2003 after having...

Teeth, sex and testosterone reveal secrets of aging in wild mouse lemurs

Mouse lemurs can live at least eight years in the wild -- twice as long as some previous estimates, a long-term longitudinal study finds.

Scientists generate first human stomach tissue in lab with stem cells

Scientists used pluripotent stem cells to generate functional, three-dimensional human stomach tissue in a laboratory -- creating an unprecedented tool for researching the development and diseases of an organ central to several public health crises, ranging from cancer to diabetes. Show More Summary

Science Graphic of the Week: How Magic Mushrooms Rearrange Your Brain

A new way of looking at the mind's activity may give insight into how psychedelic drugs produce their consciousness-altering effects. The post Science Graphic of the Week: How Magic Mushrooms Rearrange Your Brain appeared first on WIRED.

New frog discovered inhabiting I-95 corridor from Connecticut to North Carolina

More than a half century after claims that a new frog species existed in New York and New Jersey were dismissed, a team of scientists has proven that the frog is living in wetlands from Connecticut to North Carolina and are naming it after the ecologist who first noticed it.

Hawaii’s Explosive Past and Destructive Future Revealed in This Beautiful Comic

You can step through Hawaii’s fascinating and explosive history in this beautiful (nonfiction) comic by Jed McGowan. From the first hint of magma on the ocean floor about 500,000 years ago, through the human settlement of the island and into the future, McGowan illustrates each phase of the island’s growth and eventual death beautifully. Show More Summary

Combing the atmosphere to measure greenhouse gases

By remotely 'combing' the atmosphere with a custom laser-based instrument, researchers have developed a new technique that can accurately measure -- over a sizeable distance -- amounts of several of the major 'greenhouse' gases implicated in climate change.

Clean smell doesn't always mean clean air

Scientists are taking a closer look at aerosol formation involving an organic compound -- called limonene -- that provides the pleasant smell of cleaning products and air fresheners. This research will help to determine what byproducts these sweet-smelling compounds are adding to the air while we are using them to remove germs and odors.

Dozens of genes associated with autism in new research

Two major genetic studies of autism, involving more than 50 laboratories worldwide, have newly implicated dozens of genes in the disorder. The research shows that rare mutations in these genes affect communication networks in the brain and compromise fundamental biological mechanisms that govern whether, when, and how genes are activated overall.

Planet-forming lifeline discovered in a binary star system

Scientists have detected a streamer of dust and gas flowing from a massive outer disk toward the inner reaches of a binary star system. This never-before-seen feature may be responsible for sustaining a second, smaller disk of planet-forming material that otherwise would have disappeared long ago.

In autoimmune diseases affecting millions, researchers pinpoint genetic risks, cellular culprits

Scores of autoimmune diseases afflicting one in 12 Americans -- ranging from type 1 diabetes, to multiple sclerosis (MS), to rheumatoid arthritis, to asthma -- mysteriously cause the immune system to harm tissues within our own bodies. Show More Summary

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