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First inhibitor for enzyme linked to cancers created

Recent studies showing acid ceramidase (AC) to be upregulated in melanoma, lung and prostate cancers have made the enzyme a desired target for novel synthetic inhibitor compounds. Now scientists describe the very first class of AC inhibitors that may aid in the efficacy of chemotherapies.

Time-lapse photos and synched weather data unlock Antarctic secrets

Researchers are using time-lapse photography, linked to weather data, to study climate and geological change in the Antarctic Dry Valleys.

New View of the Solar System’s Most Fascinating Moon

NASA's reprocessed picture of Jupiter's Europa gives us a fresh look at the likeliest place in the solar system for extraterrestrial life.

Poop Bus Fueled by Human Waste Hits the Road

Move over, poop cruise. There's a new poop-related form of transport on the road, and this one is more neat than nasty. A "Bio-Bus" that runs solely on the biomethane gas generated by treated waste (of the food and human variety) is up and running as of this week in...

Global report card: Are children better off than they were 25 years ago?

A comprehensive analysis of children's rights in 190 countries around the world has now been released. Today, the Convention on the Rights of the Child remains the only formal global effort to improve children's rights and the most widely ratified human rights treaty in history. Show More Summary

Nuclear reactor fuel behavior during a severe event

A new discovery about the atomic structure of uranium dioxide will help scientists select the best computational model to simulate severe nuclear reactor accidents.

Deep-Earth carbon offers clues on origin of life: New organic carbon species linked to formation of diamonds -- and life itself

Scientists reveal details about carbon deep beneath Earth’s surface and suggest ways it might have influenced the history of life on the planet.

Cost of meeting basic needs rising faster than wages in Washington state

The Self-Sufficiency Standard for Washington State 2014 report finds that the costs of meeting basic needs have far outstripped wages statewide, particularly for families. The study found that Washington families with two adults, a preschooler...Show More Summary

Longer work hours for moms mean less sleep, higher BMIs for preschoolers

A link between moms' employment and overweight/obesity in preschoolers has been found by researchers. The study investigated links between mothers' employment status and their children's weight over time, exploring the impact of potential mediators, such as children's sleep and dietary habits, the amount of time they spent watching TV and family mealtime routines.

Improved nanomaterials: Understanding surface structure of quantum dots will aid design of new solar devices

A potential path to identify imperfections and improve the quality of nanomaterials for use in next-generation solar cells has just emerged.

Evolutionary principles used to model cancer mutations, discover potential therapeutic targets

Researchers are taking a unique approach to understanding and investigating cancer by utilizing evolutionary principles and computational modeling to examine the role of specific genetic mutations in the Darwinian struggle among tumor and normal cells during cancer growth.

New device reduces scarring in damaged blood vessels

A new device contains a form of vitamin A that controls inflammatory responses, preventing scar tissue formation and promoting wound healing. The soft, porous, and thin elastic material contains an acid form of vitamin A, called a retinoid, which is produced by the body to help cells develop and stay healthy. Show More Summary

Firms pressure sales people to invest in costly internal negotiations

In many firms sales people spend as much time negotiating internally for lower prices as they do interacting with customers. A new study finds that firms should allow their sales people to 'waste' energy on internal negotiations. In fact, it says, firms should make the process wasteful on purpose.

11-country survey of older adults: Americans sicker but have quicker access to specialists

A survey of older adults in eleven countries found that Americans were sicker than their counterparts abroad, with 68 percent living with two or more chronic conditions and 53 percent taking four or more medications. More Americans,Show More Summary

HIV/AIDS drugs could be repurposed to treat AMD, researchers suggest

Drugs that have been used for the past 30 years to treat HIV/AIDS, could be repurposed to treat the dry form of age-related macular degeneration (AMD), a new study suggests. AMD is a progressive condition that is untreatable in up to 90 percent of patients and is a leading cause of blindness in the elderly worldwide. Show More Summary

Investigational drug reduces high potassium levels in chronic kidney disease patients

Research published today found that the investigational drug patiromer decreased high potassium levels and maintained normal potassium levels in patients with chronic kidney disease. The results of a multicenter trial appear in the New...Show More Summary

How Did Humans Conquer 'Roof of the World'? Barley

Scientists know that humans were kicking around the lower altitudes of the Tibetan Peninsula around 10,000 years ago. Permanent settlements, however, didn't show up in the harsh higher altitudes until 3,600 years ago. What happened that allowed ancient settlers to survive in a region nicknamed the "roof of...

Geologists discover ancient buried canyon in South Tibet

Scientists have discovered an ancient, deep canyon buried along the Yarlung Tsangpo River in south Tibet, north of the eastern end of the Himalayas. The geologists say that the ancient canyon -- thousands of feet deep in places -- effectively rules out a popular model used to explain how the massive and picturesque gorges of the Himalayas became so steep, so fast.

Why some people may be immune to HIV-1: Clues

Doctors have long been mystified as to why HIV-1 rapidly sickens some individuals, while in others the virus has difficulties gaining a foothold. Now, a study of genetic variation in HIV-1 and in the cells it infects has uncovered a chink in HIV-1's armor that may, at least in part, explain the puzzling difference -- and potentially open the door to new treatments.

Dizzying heights: Prehistoric farming on the 'roof of the world'

Archaeological findings pose questions about genetic resistance in humans to altitude sickness and genetic response in crop plants to flowering times and ultraviolet radiation tolerance. Archaeological discoveries from the 'roof of the...Show More Summary

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