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When EPA worries about regulating puddles, it has gone too far

By Luther Strange, Alabama Attorney General The latest example of Obama Administration overreach is here. A new regulation issued by the Environmental Protection Agency would greatly expand federal authority over Alabama waters. The administration is selling the rule as protecting drinking water, but – make no mistake — this is about power and control. Just…

We're not alone, mathematically, but the universe may be less crowded than we think

There may be far fewer galaxies further out in the Universe then might be expected, suggests a new study based on simulations conducted using the Blue Waters supercomputer at the National Center for Supercomputing Applications, withShow More Summary

Income taxes give a more accurate picture of the value of a college degree

A new study that is the first to use Social Security Administration's personal income tax data tracking the same individuals over 20 years to measure individual lifetime earnings has confirmed significant long-term economic benefitsShow More Summary

'Map Of Life' predicts ET. (So where is he?)

The author of a new study of evolutionary convergence argues that the development of life on Earth is predictable, meaning that similar organisms should therefore have appeared on other, Earth-like planets by now. So why do we appear to be all alone in the universe?

To conduct, or to insulate? That is the question

Researchers have identified a material that behaves as a conductor and an insulator at the same time, challenging current understanding of how materials behave, and pointing to a new type of insulating state.

Astronomers predict fireworks from rare stellar encounter in 2018

Astronomers are gearing up for high-energy fireworks coming in early 2018, when a stellar remnant the size of a city meets one of the brightest stars in our galaxy.

Novel HIV vaccine regimen provides robust protection in non-human primates

A new study shows than an HIV-1 vaccine regimen, involving a viral vector boosted with a purified envelope protein, provided complete protection in half of the vaccinated non-human primates (NHPs) against a series of six repeated challenges with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV), a virus similar to HIV that infects NHPs.

Soundproofing with quantum physics

Scientists have shown that the road from abstract theory to practical applications needn't always be very long. Their mechanical implementation of a quantum mechanical phenomenon could soon be used for soundproofing purposes.

Ridges and valleys: Experiments open window on landscape formation

Geologists have seen ridges and valleys form in real time and -- even though the work was a fast-forwarded operation done in a laboratory setting -- they now have an idea of how climate change may impact landscapes.

The sting in dengue's tail

Scientists have identified how small changes in dengue's viral genome can affect the virus' ability to manipulate human immune defenses and spread more efficiently.

Vaccines and treatment for dengue virus possible

Researchers have determined the structure of a human monoclonal antibody which, in an animal model, strongly neutralizes a type of the potentially lethal dengue virus.

Unexpected enzyme may resurrect roses' fading scents

Researchers working with roses have identified an enzyme which plays a key role in producing the flowers' sweet fragrances.

Found: Antibody that zaps resilient dengue serotype

A research team has found the second-to-last piece of the puzzle needed to potentially cure or treat dengue. This is welcome news as the dengue virus infects about 400 million people worldwide annually, and there is currently no licensed vaccine available to treat it.

Why the seahorse's tail is square

Why is the seahorse's tail square? An international team of researchers has found the answer and it could lead to building better robots and medical devices. In a nutshell, a tail made of square, overlapping segments makes for better armor than a cylindrical tail. It's also better at gripping and grasping.

Telomeres linked to origins of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis

Researchers have now discovered that telomeres, the structures that protect the chromosomes, are at the origin of pulmonary fibrosis. This is the first time that telomere damage has been identified as a cause of the disease. This finding opens up new avenues for the development of therapies to treat a disease for which there is currently no treatment.

One-sided science ignores the fact that ‘Sea ice is not a stable habitat for polar bears’

Guest essay by Dr. Susan Crockford, Zoologist A new paper by Dr. Susan Crockford, published by the Global Warming Policy Foundation, explains a fundamental problem with polar bear conservation – the fallacy that under natural conditions, sea ice is a stable, predictable habitat for polar bears and their prey. Foreword by Dr. Matthew A. Cronin…

Do you really think you're a foodie?

Think you're a foodie? Adventurous eaters, known as 'foodies,' are often associated with indulgence and excess. However, a new study shows just the opposite -- adventurous eaters weigh less and may be healthier than their less-adventurous counterparts.

Commonly prescribed drugs affect decisions to harm oneself and others

Healthy people given the serotonin-enhancing antidepressant citalopram were willing to pay almost twice as much to prevent harm to themselves or others than those given placebo drugs in a moral decision-making experiment. In contrast,...Show More Summary

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