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Designer's toolkit for dynamic DNA nanomachines: Arm-waving nanorobot signals new flexibility in DNA origami

Researchers have demonstrated a new approach to joining -- and reconfiguring -- modular DNA building units, by snapping together complementary shapes instead of zipping together strings of base pairs. This not only opens the way for practical nanomachines with moving parts, but also offers a toolkit that makes it easier to program their self-assembly.

Bats obey 'traffic rules' when foraging for food

Foraging bats obey their own set of 'traffic rules,' chasing, turning and avoiding collisions at high speed according to new research.

Theory of the Strong Interaction Verified: Supercomputer calculates mass difference between neutron and proton

The fact that the neutron is slightly more massive than the proton is the reason why atomic nuclei have exactly those properties that make our world and ultimately our existence possible. Eighty years after the discovery of the neutron, a team of physicists has finally calculated the tiny neutron-proton mass difference. Show More Summary

Magnetic quantum crystals

In experiments with ultracold rubidium atoms scientists create magnetic quantum crystals made of gigantic Rydberg atoms.

Chemists make new silicon-based nanomaterials

A new process uses silicon telluride to produce multilayered two-dimensional semiconductor materials in a variety of shapes and orientations.

What Colors Did You See?

Arguing about the color of “the dress” might seem like a frivolous waste of time. But discussing the underlying issues is not. At this point we are well past peak dress. Nonstop coverage on social media seems to have resolved most of the pertinent questions, including the color: The actual dress is black and blue. Show More Summary

Genetic mutation may explain why flu can kill

Nobody likes getting the flu, but for some people, fluids and rest aren't enough. A small number of children who catch the influenza virus fall so ill they end up in the hospital -- perhaps needing ventilators to breathe -- even while their family and friends recover easily. Show More Summary

Using magnetic fields to understand high-temperature superconductivity

Taking our understanding of quantum matter to new levels, scientists are exposing high-temperature superconductors to very high magnetic fields, changing the temperature at which the materials become perfectly conducting and revealing unique properties of these substances.

Engineers develop new methods to speed up simulations in computational grand challenge

Engineers have developed a new family of methods to significantly increase the speed of time-resolved numerical simulations in computational grand challenge problems. Such problems often arise from the high-resolution approximation of the partial differential equations governing complex flows of fluids or plasmas. Show More Summary

Bacteria can use magnetic particles to create a 'natural battery'

New research shows bacteria can use tiny magnetic particles to effectively create a 'natural battery.' According to new work, the bacteria can load electrons onto and discharge electrons from microscopic particles of magnetite. This discovery holds out the potential of using this mechanism to help clean up environmental pollution, and other bioengineering applications.

Antarctic ice shelves rapidly thinning

A new study has revealed that the thickness of Antarctica's floating ice shelves has recently decreased by as much as 18 percent in certain areas over nearly two decades, providing new insights on how the Antarctic ice sheet is responding to climate change.

Ebola whole virus vaccine shown effective, safe in primates

An Ebola whole virus vaccine, constructed using a novel experimental platform, has been shown to effectively protect monkeys exposed to the often fatal virus.

Why popular antacids may increase chance of bone fractures

Newly published research posits an explanation for why 100 million Americans estimated to be taking prescription and over-the-counter antacid and heartburn medications may be at an increased risk of bone fractures. read more

Antibiotic use in livestock expected to increase - what about effectiveness?

Antibiotic consumption in livestock worldwide could rise by 67 percent between 2010 and 2030, and possibly endanger the effectiveness of antimicrobials in humans, according to researchers from Princeton University, the International Livestock Research Institute, the Université Libre de Bruxelles and the Center for Disease Dynamics, Economics and Policy. read more

How did the chicken cross the sea?

It may sound like the makings of a joke, but answering the question of how chickens crossed the sea may soon provide more than just a punch line. Researchers have studied the mysterious ancestry of the feral chicken population that has overrun the Hawaiian Island of Kauai.

Researchers master gene editing technique in mosquito that transmits deadly diseases

Researchers have successfully harnessed a technique, CRISPR-Cas9 editing, to use in an important and understudied species: the mosquito, Aedes aegypti, which infects hundreds of millions of people annually with the deadly diseases chikungunya, yellow fever, and dengue fever.

Dark matter even darker than once thought

Astronomers have studied how dark matter in clusters of galaxies behaves when the clusters collide. The results show that dark matter interacts with itself even less than previously thought, and narrows down the options for what this mysterious substance might be.

Medulloblastoma: Promising drug target identified

A protein has been found that is critical to both the normal development of the brain and, in many cases, the development of medulloblastoma, a fast-growing brain tumor that usually strikes children under 10. When the researchers cut the level of the protein Eya1 in half in mice prone to develop medulloblastoma, the animals' risk of dying from the disease dropped dramatically.

30 New Fly Species Found Buzzing in Hazy LA

It started with a friendly wager. An LA Natural History Museum trustee bet Brian Brown, the museum's entomology curator, that the city's smog-filled nooks were no place for new insect species to be found. The first bug Brown caught proved to be previously undiscovered, inspiring the Biodiversity Science: City and...

Photosynthesis hack is needed to feed the world by 2050

Using high-performance computing and genetic engineering to boost the photosynthetic efficiency of plants offers the best hope of increasing crop yields enough to feed a planet expected to have 9.5 billion people on it by 2050, researchers report.

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