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NASA study finds 1934 had worst drought of last thousand years

A new study using a reconstruction of North American drought history over the last 1,000 years found that the drought of 1934 was the driest and most widespread of the last millennium.

Researchers solve riddle of the rock pools

Research from the University of Exeter has revealed that the rock goby (Gobius paganellus), an unassuming little fish commonly found in rock pools around Britain, southern Europe, and North Africa, is a master of camouflage and can rapidly change color to conceal itself against its background.

1960s Video Explaining Longshore Sediment Transport in Southern California

After seeing my post the other day of a turbidity current caught on video, a good friend of mine sent me the link to this wonderful little film called Beach: A River of Sand. I didn’t see a production date on it, but I’m guessing it’s from the 1960s. It’s 20 minutes long and well worth watching when you […]

Northern Convergence: America's Most Dangerous Volcano, and the End of the Journey

Northern Convergence as a name for this blog series was all about the role of a convergent plate boundary in the production of the scenery of the Pacific Northwest. The compressional forces that developed as the Pacific/Farallon/Juan...Show More Summary

Researchers turn to 3-D technology to examine the formation of cliffband landscapes

This novel application of technology will be revealed at the annual meeting of the Geological Society of America in Vancouver, Canada.

Submarine ROV Captures Turbidity Current on Video

This video posted by MBARI (Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute) is quite amazing. This past August, a submarine ROV (remotely operated vehicle) was in the head of Mendocino submarine canyon (~400 m water depth), offshore northern California, when a sediment density flow (turbidity current) occurred. Show More Summary

Microfossils reveal warm oceans had less oxygen, geologists say

Researchers in Syracuse University's College of Arts and Sciences are pairing chemical analyses with micropaleontology -- the study of tiny fossilized organisms -- to better understand how global marine life was affected by a rapid warming event more than 55 million years ago. Their findings are the subject of an article in the journal Paleoceanography.

Scientists discover carbonate rocks are unrecognized methane sink

Since the first undersea methane seep was discovered 30 years ago, scientists have meticulously analyzed and measured how microbes in the seafloor sediments consume the greenhouse gas methane. They have now found a type of rock known as authigenic carbonate also contains vast amounts of active microbes that take up methane. Show More Summary

Cliffs of the Ruby Mountains: Mt. Gilbert

The glacially carved cliffs around Camp Lamoille are truly spectacular — and while we were, now nearly a month ago — they provided us with constant fascination and wonderment amid the ever-changing light and cloud effects. To the south of us, besides Ruby Spire and the Wolf's Ear (seen in this earlier post), Mt. Show More Summary

AZGS geologists will lead field trip to Sabino Canyon debris flows

AZGS geologists Dr. Phil Pearthree and Dr. Ann Youberg will lead the Arizona Geological Society Fall Field Trip - "Debris Flows Shape the Sabino Canyon Landscape - look out below!" Sabino Canyon Visitor Center Patio, located at 5900 North Sabino Canyon Road, Catalina Foothills, Arizona. Show More Summary

A unique approach to monitoring groundwater supplies near Ohio fracking sites

As fracking expands in Ohio, University of Cincinnati researchers are expanding their testing of private water wells.

The Blind Men and the Elephant, as Told by Geologists: The Channeled Scablands of Washington

A dry channel in basalt on the Columbia Plateau in central Washington (photo by Mrs. Geotripper) I'm sure most are familiar with the parable of the blind men and the elephant. Several men investigate an elephant, but each touches a different...Show More Summary

Penjing—in Oakland?

Havenscourt Boulevard is a handsome street—wide, with a row of large palms up one side and offering nice views of the Seminary gap and the low and high hills. Then there are the homes, where I spotted this creative use of a roof drain. The water runs down a chute to a stilling basin, where […]

Loma Prieta plus 25

Yesterday I attended the Loma Prieta 25 Symposium at the Kaiser Center. It was a quake geek’s Woodstock, where a motley host of experts got together to schmooze, celebrate 25 years of progress since the 1989 earthquake, and look ahead. At 10:16 a.m., along with 27 million other people around the world, we participated in […]

Geologists dig into science around the globe, on land and at sea

UC research and discoveries will be highlighted at The Geological Society of America's Annual Meeting and Exposition in Vancouver, Canada.

Space-based methane maps find largest US signal in Southwest

An unexpectedly high amount of the climate-changing gas methane, the main component of natural gas, is escaping from the Four Corners region in the US Southwest, according to a new study by the University of Michigan and NASA.

Saying Good-bye to the Glaciers of Glacier National Park

The view north from Logan Pass in Glacier National Park Make no mistake about it. Glacier National Park is one of the most spectacular parks in the United States, and indeed is one of my favorite places on planet Earth. That said, it's losing something important, and the change is profound. Show More Summary

Partial Solar Eclipse from California (and What a Sunspot!)

Wow. Just wow. Yes there was a partial solar eclipse today that was visible across much of the country, and yes, it was pretty spectacular. But what caught my attention was the huge sunspot. It is the first time I've ever seen a sunspot with the naked eye, and it was incredible in the zoom lens. Show More Summary

Northern Convergence: Leaving a Beautiful Country

How will we deal with the hordes of people from the U.S. trying to invade our borders? Our trip, the Northern Convergence tour, was not over, but the time had come to cross the border back into the United States from Canada. The trip thus far had been an eye-opener. Show More Summary

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