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The Inside Scoop on the Chilean Earthquake Swarm

According to locals, Valparaiso's 6.9 isn't worthy of being called an earthquake. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

From the Road: Some Nice Gneiss

Every time I drive Highway 6 between Idaho Springs and Golden, Colorado—and I almost always take that route when heading east, rather than the section of I-70 between Idaho Springs and the hogbacks—I try to get a few photos of the great gneiss forming the canyon walls. Show More Summary

Why Science Matters: March For Science 2017

A bank robber can make a lot of arguments about why he or she should be allowed to rob a bank. "The money in the bank is just sitting there, it's not aiding the economy by being circulated", or "By taking this money and spending it, I'll be creating jobs", or "But I'll give some of the money to charities". Show More Summary

We'll Pretend I Saw the Superbloom the Same Way I Hiked the Pacific Crest Trail Today

I showed up late and at the wrong address for the party. There have been so many reports of the "superbloom" of wildflowers around Southern California this winter and spring that I was anxious to do some traveling and see the sights....Show More Summary

What I marched for

Saturday was Earth Day, an occasion that usually leaves me lukewarm at best. But this year it was also the day of the worldwide March for Science. A few news stories have quoted environmentalists who resented that the march happened on “their” day. But from my viewpoint, that’s the best day of the year for […]

One Simple But Effective Action You Can Take for American Science - Today

The March for Science is over, but the fight for science is just getting started. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Kelvin-Helmoltz Clouds Over the Sierra Nevada?

I defer to those who know more about such things, so are these Kelvin-Helmoltz clouds I saw today over the Sierra Nevada east of Madera? We were driving home on Highway 99 in the Great Valley when we saw these clouds forming on the eastern horizon in the Sierra between Kings Canyon and Yosemite National Parks. Show More Summary

'Be it Proclaimed' - Salute to Dr. Mary Poulton (Univ AZ)

Sen. McCain aide (l) reading letter thanking Mary Poulton (r). At today's Arizona Mining Alliance luncheon, Dr. Mary Poulton, Professor, University of Arizona, was honored for her long service to America's mining industry and to her students and colleagues at the University of Arizona. Show More Summary

Managing the Colorado River | 27 April

Interested in the fate of the Colorado River in a period of overallocation, drought and climate change? Come join the discussion next Thursday, 27 April at 4:00 p.m. on the campus of the Univ. of Arizona: Environment and Natural Resources 2, Room S107, Tucson, AZ.

Arizona House Rules Committee Passes SB1415

Today, the Arizona House Rules Committee passed SB1415. SB1415 transfers the Polly Rosenbaum Building and the former mineral and mining artifact collections to the Univ. of Arizona. I gather this was a pro forma meeting before the Rules Committee as it ended less than 10 minutes after it began. Show More Summary

Essential collectibles #8: Coprolites

Our look at those fossils that commonly bought rather than collected has so far looked at the fossil remains of animals, whether shells, teeth or whatever. But this time we’re looking at a trace fossil; […]...

Blue John stone: a remarkable fluorite from a limestone cavern

Blue John stone is the name given to banded fluorite found in the Castleton area of Derbyshire in England (Ollernshaw, 1964). It has been prized for centuries. Chemically, it is a calcium fluoride (CaF2) and […]...

Geology and terrestrial life of the Carboniferous

The Carboniferous Period is a fascinating time in earth history. It spanned 60myrs (359.2 to 299.0mya), towards the end of the Palaeozoic era, falling between the Devonian and Permian. During the Carboniferous, the supercontinent Pangaea […]

An Ammonite Pendant from Highland New Guinea

In recent years, a number of ammonite pendants, similar to the one in Fig. 1, have been offered by tribal art dealers. As scientific objects, they offer the interest all fossils – a chance to […]...

Denizens of the Oxford Clay

In many ways, Britain is the birth-place of palaeontology, and the heady years of the 19th century saw the discovery of creatures that have inspired the imagination of small boys ever since – myself included. […]...

Orphan mine site taken into care

One of New Zealand’s most contaminated sites, the Tui Mine near Te Aroha, is to be cleaned up. The New Zealand budget for 2007 confirmed that NZ$9.88 million was available for the two-year project. The […]...

Fossil folklore: ammonites

People have collected fossils since prehistoric times. In pre-scientific times, a remarkable folklore developed about how fossils originated and their usefulness. Folklore refers to the beliefs – usually non-scientific – and customs of ordinary people. […]

Geoscience and Arizona - coming soon from AGI

Front page of 2-p Factsheet The American Geosciences Institute in Washington D.C. is pioneering a nationwide program going state-by-state to examine the geoscience resources, funding, and research environment in each state. New Mexico was the latest beneficiary; Geoscience and New Mexico released just the other day. Show More Summary

A historical note on amber

Throughout Roman times, amber was considered the ‘Gold of the North’. It was believed to have medicinal properties that cured arthritis, protected people from suffering mental illness, and healed sore throats. People also thought it […]

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