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An Iconic Bit of the Calaveras Fault in Hollister is Gone (But it will be back)

15 hours agoAcademics / Geology : Geotripper

Corner of Locust and Central Avenues in 2016 I go on field studies trips year after year, and my camera is always around my neck, to the amusement of my students. They sometimes wonder why I would take pictures of things I already have dozens of pictures already. Show More Summary

Why did the Road Cross the San Andreas Fault? 15 Years of Geologic Change (an Update)

17 hours agoAcademics / Geology : Geotripper

2002 I've been leading geology field studies trips to lots of places in the American West for 29 years and started to take digital pictures in 2001. I sometimes struggle to find new things to photograph when I visit a place for the 29th time, but in some cases it is not a problem. Show More Summary

Aerial Geology: A High Altitude Tour of North America's Spectacular Volcanoes, Canyons, Glaciers, Lakes, Craters, and Peaks. A Book Review...

A most interesting book landed on my desk recently. Timber Press asked me if I was interested in reviewing Mary Caperton Morton's book Aerial Geology, A High Altitude Tour of North America's Spectacular Volcanoes, Canyons, Glaciers, Lakes, Craters, and Peaks. Show More Summary

Disaster Geology: 2017's Most Deadly Earthquake

The geologic story behind the Iran-Iraq earthquake -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Bedrock in the headwaters of Trestle Glen Creek

Surprisingly, the town of Piedmont has its share of woodland trails — well they’re paved sidewalks, but they’re unused, covered with duff and overhung with untended shrubbery. On a weekday afternoon, you can walk quietly on miles of these soft paths and encounter only a handful of property workers. It’s in that spirit that I […]

A Landscape as Bizarre as They Come: The Volcanic Tableland of the Eastern Sierra Nevada

The Volcanic Tableland, with the White Mountains beyond. There is a bizarre landscape on the far side of the Sierra Nevada between Bishop and Mammoth Lakes. It's not one of stark beauty exactly, it's barren and covered by little more than sagebrush. Show More Summary

What? Why Would I Ever Want to Give Up my Parking Spot in Yosemite Valley?

"Why?", indeed. I have to admit that I get just a little tiny bit elitist at times, at least in my approach to visiting my favorite national park, Yosemite (program note: my "favorite national park" is likely to change on a nearly daily basis, depending on whichever one I happen to have visited most recently). Show More Summary

Grotto Rock Park

In preparation for the 4-mile walk I’m leading on 18 November for the Berkeley Path Wanderers, I’ve been visiting some of the unique and wonderful rock parks in north Berkeley. Grotto Rock Park will not be on the route, so I’ll feature it here. It’s a little park on Santa Barbara Road at Indian Rock […]

Looking Down on Yosemite: A Return to Taft Point

I don't know how it happened, but somehow 12 years slipped by since I last made the hike out to Taft Point above the floor of Yosemite Valley. It's not that tough of a hike, only 1.1 miles with just a bit of climbing on the way back....Show More Summary

Utah Earthquakes (1850–2016) and Quaternary Faults

Our newest post on the recently released, and magnificent, 'Utah Earthquakes (1850–2016) and Quaternary Faults' map by Steve Bowman (Utah Geol. Survey) and Walter J. Arabasz (Univ. of Utah Seismic Stations) is available at our new blog site. Image: Zoomed into the faults and earthquakes near Salt Lake City, Utah's largest metro center. Thanks, The Management

Perhaps a Last Look at Some Yosemite High Country (for the Winter, Anyway)

"Half" Dome from Washburn Point I made the trek up the hill to see Yosemite last weekend, with a field trip on the valley floor on Saturday with my students, and a quieter tour in the high country with Mrs. Geotripper on Sunday. We headed up Glacier Point Road to gain a unique perspective on Yosemite Valley and the higher country above. Show More Summary

Finding Peace in the Nation's Most Crowded Park: A Walk Through Yosemite Valley

If you've read my previous couple of posts, you know I was in Yosemite Valley over the weekend. I was guiding my students on a field trip up the Merced River and into the park on Saturday, and I came back on Sunday seeking some better pictures of the recent rockfall at El Capitan. Show More Summary

Eerie, Outrageous, and Astonishing Geology

The supernatural ain't got nothing on our own Planet Earth. -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

El Capitan Rockfall: Alternate Views, and a Realization That This Wasn't the First TIme

El Capitan and the September rockfall from Taft Point on Oct. 29, 2017 Yosemite Valley changed geologically on September 27 and 28, and as I noted in my previous post, the valley will never look the same again. A series of rock falls...Show More Summary

‘Bulges’ in volcanoes could be used to predict eruptions

A team of researchers from the University of Cambridge have developed a new way of measuring the pressure inside volcanoes, and found that it can be a reliable indicator of future eruptions. The post ‘Bulges’ in volcanoes could be used to predict eruptions appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Naracoorte, where half a million years of biodiversity and climate history are trapped in caves

In 1857, guided by the flickering light of a candle deep in a cave at Naracoorte in South Australia, the Reverend Julian Tenison-Woods stumbled across thousands of tiny bones of rodents and small marsupials buried at the base of crystal...Show More Summary

Deep magma reservoirs are key to volcanic ‘super-eruptions’, new research suggests

Large reservoirs of magma stored deep in the Earth's crust are key to producing some of the Earth's most powerful volcanic eruptions, new research has shown. The post Deep magma reservoirs are key to volcanic ‘super-eruptions’, new research suggests appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Large volcanic eruption may have caused the first mass extinction

Researchers in the USA and Japan say they may have found the cause of the first mass extinction of life. The post Large volcanic eruption may have caused the first mass extinction appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Norway’s oldest ice found in central Norway

Parts of the ice of the Juvfonne snow patch in Jotunheimen are 7600 years old, which makes it the oldest dated ice on mainland Norway. The post Norway’s oldest ice found in central Norway appeared first on HeritageDaily - Heritage & Archaeology News.

Orinda’s 1204 Hill

As far as I know this hill has no name, but it’s a highly visible part of Orinda. You pass it on Route 24 between the Wilder exit and downtown, as seen in this Google Maps perspective view. The USGS topo maps give it an elevation of 1204 feet, so I’ll call it 1204 Hill. […]

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