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Return of Arizona Mining Review: Mining Pozzolan in Central Arizona

Volcanic tuff pozzolan exposed at Kirkland Mine Return of Arizona Mining Review Following a 15-month hiatus, the Arizona Mining Review (AMR) filmed and its 40 th episode, Pozzolan mining in central Arizona, on 28 Aug 2017. The Arizona Geological Survey’s Geologic Extension Service launched the Review in Jan. Show More Summary

Watching the sand flow

For the past several years, the American Geophysical Union (AGU) has hosted the AGU Cinema program at their annual Fall meeting in San Francisco. They posted some of 2016's best entries online. The one that caught my eye was the 4-minute, " Drift: Measuring the Movement of Sand Dunes", produced by Josh Silberg and the Hakai Institute. Show More Summary

Tales of the Mojave: A Dry Placer

And now, let us continue with my Tales of the Mojave series. In our last post, we had barely left town—town being Reno, NV, hundreds of miles to the north, and we being Allie and I, two young and fairly junior geologists: I was beginning my fourth full year as an exploration geologist; Allie was beginning her first. Show More Summary

Repost: Here's to You, Geological Heroes

My DSL lines and WiFi, provided by Frontier (or not provided, as the case may be), are currently quite lousy with 50%-plus packet loss. For some reason, Google pages and products, including this blog, work at least slowly and sporadically, as does the NWS weather site. Show More Summary

Mapping Earth Fissures in Arizona - An ongoing task!

Fresh earth fissure in southern Pinal County Over the past several years, the AZGS’ Earth Fissure Mapping team has identified new and reactivated earth fissures in Cochise, La Paz, Maricopa, and Pinal Counties. In early January 2017,...Show More Summary

New two-mile-long earth fissure discovered in southern Pinal County

Figure 1. Appearance of Tator Hill fissures in December 2014 Google Earth imagery. Red arrows point to the new fissure; blue to an older, previously mapped fissure. Note sharp, unvegetated appearance of new earth fissure compared to old fissure. Show More Summary

Coming Floods This Week May Rival 1997: Predictions at Yosemite Valley

9 months agoAcademics / Geology : Geotripper

National Park Service Photograph This weekend's storm, if it lives up to predictions, may be one for the history books. Present projections are suggesting that the Merced River could rival the flows from the apocalyptic floods of 1997. Show More Summary

Coming California Storm is Reminescent of Flooding Events Past

9 months agoAcademics / Geology : Geotripper

Source: Washington Post We are waiting for the arrival of two intense storms over the course of the next week, a pair of "atmospheric river storms". Strong low pressure cells originating in the Bay of Alaska are going to tap into a flow...Show More Summary

The Left-Lateral Strike-Slip Garlock Fault Near Highway 395

While out on the last road trip, I started taking pictures from places where roads crossed the Great Basin Divide. Unfortunately, I soon gave that up because freeways, which I traveled not exclusively but considerably, are lousy places from which to take pictures. Show More Summary

The Hawai'i That Was: Look at the Cute Squirrel! (NOT a squirrel)

First time visitors to Hawai'i will at some moment see a mammal on the islands. The creature is common enough to be taken as some kind of squirrel, but it most certainly is not one. It's not a rat either, but it is representative ofShow More Summary

Watching the Hazy Sun Sink into the Sea (almost)

The sun was almost sinking into the sea, since the coast is oriented a bit too much towards the south. I'm in Southern California for family matters (of a happier kind), and had the opportunity to watch the sunset from out on Balboa Pier. Show More Summary

The Hawai'i That Was: Pu'u O'o, the Volcano We Couldn't See

The Pu'u O'o cone from above Hilo Disclaimer: This is NOT happening right now! These pictures are from 2009.Pu'u O'o is the invisible volcano on the Big Island. It's been the center of eruptive activity for much of the last thirty years, but there are very few easily accessible localities from which it can be seen. Show More Summary

Driving to the Center of the Earth in Del Puerto Canyon...Piercing the Ocean Crust

Rugged terrain in the upper Del Puerto Canyon just beyond the Tesla-Ortigalita fault (on the right near the people) As in the last post, I'm exaggerating a little bit. We're not going to the center of the Earth, we are instead usingShow More Summary

Seismic hazards of Santa Rita fault in southeast Arizona

Dr. Phil Pearthree and Dr. Mike Conway at AZGS describe the Santa Rita Fault below the western flank of the Santa Rita Mountains, south of Tucson, Arizona in this short documentary film posted on YouTube. This active fault system is capable of producing a magnitude 6.5 earthquake.

Geological Frightfest: Fantasia

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Fantasia-poster-1940.jpg All right, so Fantasia probably isn't the first thing you think of when the topics of horror movies or geology come up (and I'm not talking about the whole movie, so I'm cheating a bit with this one). Show More Summary

Dramatic videos of Gold King Mine spill released by EPA

The Environmental Protection Agency has posted a set of short videos taken as the spill began of mineral-rich waste water from the Gold King mine in Colorado on August 5. I've embedded one of the ten posted below, showing what looks like the full force of the waters surging out of the mine tunnel. Show More Summary

An elegant solution to acid mine remediation

You are probably familiar with the recent Gold King Mine waste water spill in Colorado and the resulting chorus of calls for cleaning up abandoned mines across the West. As part of this month’s Arizona Mining Review, our online video...Show More Summary

Vagabonding on Dangerous Ground: Controversial Stone People, Fire and Ice, and an Olympic Legacy

A stone person stands on an outcrop up in Callaghan Creek a few kilometers west of Whistler in British Columbia. It has been called an inuksuk, although inunnguaq may be the more proper name (it's the difference between "something which acts for or performs the function of a person" and "imitation of a person"). Show More Summary

New report indicates massive increase in uranium potential in northwest Arizona

We released our new report yesterday “ Partial database for breccia pipes and collapse features on the Colorado Plateau, northwestern Arizona ” ( http://www.azgs.az.gov/news_releases2015.shtml#jun24 ) that found concentrations of breccia pipes 10 to 100 times higher than previously known, in two test study areas. Show More Summary

"Steam plume" from Sunset Crater is likely just smoke from forest fire

A report of a purported "steam cloud" from Sunset Crater near Flagstaff appears to be mis-identification of a smoke plume from a Forest Service prescribed burn near A-1 Mountain a few miles to the southwest that passed over the crater, or possibly an orographic cloud formation in the lee of San Francisco Peak. Show More Summary

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