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40,000-year-old rope-making tool found in famed German cave

Archaeologists excavating the Hohle Fels Cave in the Swabian Jura of southwestern Germany have discovered a 40,000-year-old tool used to make rope. The piece was unearthed in August of last year by an international team led by Prof. Nicholas Conard of the University of Tübingen. Carved from mammoth ivory, the object is eight inches long [...]

“He would produce a better one”

In investigating the anecdote about George Washington’s whisper at the Constitutional Convention, I started to wonder about the political views of Maryland delegate John Francis Mercer. Mercer arrived at the Philadelphia convention on 6 Aug 1787. Show More Summary

Roman coin hoard found by students in Spain

A team of archaeology students has unearthed a Republican-era Roman coin hoard at the Empúries site on the Costa Brava of Catalonia, northeastern Spain. The hoard was discovered secreted in a hole in the ground inside a 1st century B.C. domus. A small ceramic pot shaped like an amphora contained silver denarii from the same [...]

Is 2016 the Worst Year in History?

When news of the truck killings in Nice, France, broke last week, I started seeing variations of the same sentiment on Twitter and Facebook: Is this the worst year ever, or what? (“Dear 2016,” one meme asked. “Y U No End Soon?”) Terror...Show More Summary

A 19th-Century Board Game Made to Teach Young Germans About Colonialism

This Deutschland's Kolonien-Spiel, or “Game of Germany's Colonies,” toured child players through German territories abroad. Images of the game were recently digitized by the Getty Research Institute, which holds a surviving example. In...Show More Summary

“The army shall not consist of more than — thousand men”

When John Francis Mercer arrived late at the Constitutional Convention on 6 Aug 1787, he was only twenty-eight years old—the second youngest man there. But he wasn’t shy about speaking up.The day after Mercer signed in, James Madison’s...Show More Summary

Gems of Australia’s rich quilting history

A new exhibit at the National Gallery of Victoria is putting on display an exceptional collection of quilts and related pieces from Australia’s rich history of patchwork. Making the Australian Quilt: 1800–1950 brings together almost 100 quilts, blankets, coverlets, and patchwork clothes from museums and private collections all over the country. They date to the [...]

Temporary National Cemetery Parking Lot

While the old Cyclorama Parking Lot is being replaced (out of sight to the right of this view), a temporary parking lot has been established south of the National Cemetery. This lot used to be used by employees of the National Park Service when the the old Visitors Center complex was located nearby. Show More Summary

Republic of Benin

Map of Republic of Benin (Republique du Benin). Page 3.

Union officer killed at First Manassas honored in U.S. and Ireland

Irish native Capt. James Haggerty of the 69th New York State Militia was one of the first officers to die 155 years ago today, July 21, at First Manassas. A hero of the day, it wasn’t until 1992 that a memorial stone was placed at his grave.

Washington’s Whisper

In 1817, the Philadelphia Federalist magazine The Port Folio (possibly cribbing from an unnamed newspaper) published this anecdote about the Constitutional Convention:Anecdote of [George] Washington.—In debate, in the house of delegates of Virginia, 1817, on the bill relative to a map of the state, in which something was said of military roads, Mr. Show More Summary

Should This Civil War Museum Change Its Logo?

Even the Museum of the Confederacy/American Civil War Museum gets it. The Confederate battle flag is a toxic symbol that ought to be displayed exclusively in a setting where it can be properly interpreted. You will not find battle flags welcoming visitors at its branches in Richmond or at Appomattox. The producers of Destination DC […]

Indigenous, colonial interaction writ on Caribbean cave walls

A team of British and Puerto Rican archaeologists have discovered a collection of early colonial inscriptions alongside earlier indigenous iconography on the walls of a cave on the Caribbean island of Mona. It’s a unique document of the interaction between indigenous and European culture and at the time of their earliest interactions. Columbus first encountered [...]

Cyclorama Parking Lot Update

A number of trees are being removed in the area of the Cyclorama parking lot. We took two panoramas yesterday, one in the morning and one in the afternoon, to give you the latest update. You can compare them to our panoramas from previous days (click to enlarge). We have also included a few photos […] The post Cyclorama Parking Lot Update appeared first on Gettysburg Daily.

Patrick Henry’s Gerrymandering

Elizabeth Kolbert’s New Yorker essay “Drawing the Line,” a review of David Daley’s new book on modern computer-aided gerrymandering, starts out with this snatch of early Virginia politics:Sometime around October 20, 1788, Patrick Henry...Show More Summary

Oldest papyri from oldest port go on display

Dating to around 2600 B.C., the harbor at Wadi al-Jarf on the Red Sea in Egypt is the oldest port complex ever discovered in the world. It was built during the reign of the Pharaoh Snefru (ca. 2620–2580 B.C.), the founder of the 4th Dynasty, and was primarily used for boat travel to the Egypt’s [...]

What is the Purpose in Reconstructing the Hancock Avenue Gate?

Welcome to the next battle of Gettysburg. What should be the appearance and purpose of this and any other National Military Park? As part of the Cyclorama parking lot deconstruction there will be a structure placed along the Taneytown Road. Show More Summary

New to the Civil War Memory Library, 07/19

Announcement: Earlier today I learned that the University Press of Kentucky will bring Remembering The Battle of the Crater: War as Murder out in paperback next spring. I’ve been hoping for some time that they would do this and I couldn’t be more excited. I will provide additional information as it becomes available. Douglas R. […]

Taking Stock of Richard Stockton

Back in 2008 I wrote a series of postings about Richard Stockton, a judge from New Jersey who signed the Declaration of Independence in August 1776. Four months later he was in the custody of the British army. As I discussed in my first...Show More Summary

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