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“Massive Resistance” Generation Responds to the Committee

I have absolutely no problem with students and alumni at Washington & Lee University expressing disagreement with the school’s decision regarding the display of Confederate flags in Lee Chapel. After all, it’s their school. I expressed concerns about the Committee’s list of demands early on so I am certainly sympathetic to both sides. But there... Continue reading

Thinking Out Loud About the Amphipolis Tomb ~ The Rogueclassicist Speculates

School starts tomorrow so I don’t know whether I’ll have time to flesh this out today, but I want to put this suggestion out there. It actually builds on assorted things proposed by plenty of folks but adds something original, I think. Here’s my speculation on the tomb based on recent things: 1. It is […]

Rediscovered Ur skeleton on public view at Penn Museum

The 6,500-year-old skeleton excavated from Ur in 1929 and rediscovered last month in the basement of the University of Pennsylvania’s Penn Museum is now on public view. It was moved from storage on Saturday to the museum’s In the Artifact Lab, glass-walled conservation lab that gives visitors the chance to see conservators at work. The [...]

Forgotten cavalryman: Dick the war horse

With much gratitude to Al Eelman of Philadelphia, who was kind enough to share both this photo and the accompanying narrative with me. For a larger version of the photo, click the image. I often tell the stories of cavalrymen. Today, I get to tell the story of a cavalryman’s horse, which is not something that I get to do very often. Show More Summary

Channell on “Revolutionary Sailors” in Quincy, 3 Sept.

On Wednesday, 3 September, the Thomas Crane Library in Quincy will host a talk by Fred Channell on the topic “Discover Historic New England: Revolutionary Sailors.” The event announcement says Channell “will present his research about...Show More Summary

New to the Civil War Memory Library, 09/01

Heading back into the classroom tomorrow, but I hope to make time to get through these new releases at some point. Best of luck to all of you who are preparing for a new school year as well. Edward E. Baptist, The Half Has Never Been Told: Slavery and the Making of American Capitalism (Basic... Continue reading

Bison return to National Zoo for 125th anniversary

You may have seen the famous picture of American bison who lived behind the Smithsonian Castle on the National Mall in Washington, D.C., in the late 19th century. I posted it a few years ago when the Castle was damaged in an earthquake just because it’s such a charming image. What I didn’t realize at [...]

Ancient vs. Modern Perspectives on Sparta

This month I’m pleased to have W. Lindsey Wheeler as a guest blogger. He brings a refreshing perspective through meticulous analysis that contradicts the conventional sophistry that has been taught about Sparta over the last 400 years. Show More Summary

Samuel “Rat-trap” Adams’s Revolution

According to Samuel “Rat-trap” Adams, the wire-worker and former town crier, he: was six years old when the Stamp Act protests occurred, eleven in the year of the Boston Massacre, fourteen during the Tea Party, and sixteen in the first year of the war. Show More Summary

Grave of fearsome 11th c. warrior found in Siberia

Archaeologists excavating a burial mound near Omsk in southwestern Siberia have discovered the intact burial of an impressively large warrior slain in battle around the 11th century A.D. He was powerfully built and 180 centimeters (5’11?) tall. A member of the Ust-Ishim culture, ancestors to the Khanty and Mansi tribes that still inhabit the area [...]

Samuel Adams’s Petition to the Legislature

Yesterday I mentioned a New England Historical and Genealogical Register obituary for Samuel “Rat-trap” Adams after his death in 1855. After giving some details about his parents it said:At the time of the Revolution he was old enough to perform services in that cause, which he did, on the patriot side. Show More Summary

France returns skull of New Caledonian chief

After 135 years, the skull of High Chief Ataï from the Pacific archipelago of New Caledonia has been returned to his homeland. In a ceremony on August 28th, France’s Overseas Territories Minister George Pau-Langevin gave the skull to Bergé Kawa, a chief in his own right and a direct descendant Ataï’s. This is a righting [...]

The U.S. Grant of Social Commentary

I got a kick out of Ta-Nehisi Coates’s Twitter profile page.

American Civil War Museum Taking Shape

We now have an artist’s rendering of what the new American Civil War Museum will look like along the James River in Richmond, Virginia. The new building is the culmination of the recent merger between the Museum of the Confederacy and American Civil War Center at Historic Tredegar. The new two-story building will have 39,818... Continue reading

Podcast ~ Drunk Archaeology: Trafficking Culture: Looting/Illicit Trade

The official description: YAY! Here’s the second episode of the Drunk Archaeology podcast! In this 65-min program, Donna Yates of anonymousswisscollector.com, Meg Lambert of traffickingculture.org, and Sarah Parcak of the Laboratory for Global Observation talk about looting and the illicit trade of antiquities. Show More Summary

Is this to-be-auctioned Inscription to Vitiris Known?

Before I get the blogosphere posts up, I need to ask about an eBay auction that distracted me last night. It concerns this stone: The text reads: DEO SAN CTO VITIRI LVNARIS VL VSLM As of today, it’s an ebay listing at: Ancient Roman Stone Votive Altar For The God Vitris – 3rd Century AD […]

Looking for Samuel Adams’s Family

I’ve been writing about Samuel “Rat-trap” Adams, a well-known character in Boston who died in 1855. He was honored as a suvivor of the Revolution, and he owned a red and white striped flag that he said had been flown from a pole on Essex...Show More Summary

First Roman wood toilet seat found at Vindolanda

There are many surviving examples of Roman latrines with their characteristic marble bench seating dotted with keyhole-shaped openings. The seats weren’t always stone, however. There were wooden toilet seats as well, but the organic material decays leaving behind only the stone or brick structure. Now archaeologists have unearthed the first Roman toilet seat made of [...]

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