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Roman bathhouse found under Carlisle Cricket Club

An archaeological survey at the Carlisle Cricket Club’s Edenside ground has discovered the remains of an extraordinarily important Roman bathhouse and dozens of artifacts. Archaeology contractors Wardell Armstrong were called in to survey the site of a proposed new floodproof pavilion, expecting to find little more than random fill dumped during the construction of the [...]

Bamburgh Castle find

Bamburgh dig uncovers unique find The continued archaeological investigation of Bamburgh Castle, once the palace site of the early medieval kings of Northumbria, has revealed a marvellous new find of national significance. The copper alloy fragment is small, 23mm by 12mm, but beautifully decorated with an intricate zoomorphic representation of a bird, characteristic of […]

Franz Xaver Mozart finally steps out of his dad’s shadow

Born on July 26th, 1791, Franz Xaver Mozart was barely four months old when his father Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart breathed his last on December 5th, 1791. He and his older brother Karl Thomas were the only two of Wolfgang and Constanze’s six children to survive to adulthood, and almost from birth he was doomed to [...]

Tiny medieval bird found at Bamburgh Castle

Archaeologists excavating Bamburgh Castle in Northumberland have discovered an artifact whose historical significance is as large as its dimensions are small: a copper alloy fragment decorated with a stylized representation of a bird of a type often found in early medieval art from northern Europe. Just 23mm by 12mm (.9 by.5 inches) in size, [...]

Larnaca Update

So, it has been a few hectic days in Larnaca. We have been working at the Museum’s off-site storage facility trying to finish things up for PKAP II. Tuesday was another rainy day, it stormed for a while. There was a … Continue readi...

Test of Rollo’s descendants’ bones gangs agley

Last year, a team of French, Danish and Norwegian researchers exhumed skeletal remains from the tombs of two medieval dukes of Normandy, direct descendants of Rollo, the 10th century Viking raider who so effectively plundered the towns along the Seine that King Charles the Simple had to bribe him with great swaths of property. Those [...]

Henge, human remains found in Warwickshire

An archaeological excavation of a field slated for development in Newbold-on-Stour near Stratford, Warwickshire, has discovered traces of a Neolithic henge and rare human remains dating back almost 6,000 years to around 4,000 or 3,000 B.C. A geophysical survey indicated the possible presence of something of archaeological interest resulting in a preliminary dig last year, [...]

Back in Larnaca

So, Saturday night Bill and I headed out to our favorite Polis restaurant (The Old Town Restaurant). They have a meze there that is fantastic. Unfortunately, since it was raining off and on all day, they had moved all their … Continue reading ?

Large cache of embalming materials found in Middle Kingdom tomb

Archaeologists with the Middle Kingdom Theban Project have rediscovered a large cache of mummification materials in the necropolis of Deir el-Bahari on the West Bank of the Nile at Luxor. The Spanish archaeological mission, led by Dr. Antonio Morales, found 56 amphorae and close to 300 linen packets of natron and other materials used in [...]

Ancient bronze stud stolen from Pompeii exhibition

Today in people are the worst news, a bronze artifact from the 6th century B.C. has been stolen from an exhibition at the archaeological site of Pompeii. The object was a door ornament on loan from the National Archaeological Museum of Basilicata in Potenza. It’s not of great monetary value. Just 7.3 inches in diameter [...]

Last Work Day in Polis

Today was our last work day at the apotheke in Polis – and it was windy and rainy for most of the day. Tomorrow we are heading back to Larnaca so we can work on PKAP material. As is our … Continue reading ?

Searching for Plans to build an Ark

Well, this has been an unusual season in Polis so far. The rain has continued to fall, and at times it has been very heavy. Last night we drove out to Fly Again for dinner. I was worried as we … Continue reading ?

Human blood found on Revolutionary War musket ball

Archaeologists have discovered remnants of human blood on a musket ball discovered at Monmouth Battlefield Park in New Jersey, site of the June 28th, 1778, Battle of Monmouth. This is the first time human blood has been found on Revolutionary War artillery shot. The site has been excavated regularly for close to 30 years by [...]

Friday at Polis

We are in Polis only for a short time this season. In fact, we will be leaving Sunday to head to Larnaca, so that we can do a short study season working on PKAP material for volume 2. Today was … Continue reading ?

Potato Chip Research Continues

While many people think I am in Cyprus working on Late Roman Ceramics, those in the know are aware that my potato chip research is what is really driving my work on the island. [On a side note, it is … Continue reading ?

Settling In

We began work at the apotheke yesterday. It went as it usually does, a little chaotic. Some of it involves arranging things that have been in storage and plugging in things. We also set up the portable XRF station and checked … Continue reading ?

Rijksmuseum aquires 1st photo illustrated book by 1st female photographer

The Rijksmuseum has acquired an extremely rare copy of the first photographically illustrated book, a compendium of British algae created and privately published by botanist Anna Atkins. The museum bought the book from a private collector for €450,000 ($500,000) with funding from the lottery and family foundations. These were contact prints, technically photograms rather than [...]

Ashmolean aquires unique Civil War painting

The Ashmolean Museum has acquired an exceptional group painting by Civil War-era court painter William Dobson. It was acquired through the Acceptance in Lieu scheme, which allows donation of nationally significant artworks and antiquities in place of payment of taxes owing, and allocated to the Ashmolean because of the painting’s unique relevance to Oxford during [...]

Nodosaur fossil so well-preserved it boggles minds

A dinosaur fossil that was discovered in a bitumen pit in Alberta, Canada, in 2011 is the best-preserved specimen of a nodosaur ever discovered, and it is truly a spectacle to behold. The herbivore died between 110 and 112 million years ago in a riverbed and was swept to sea where it was swiftly buried [...]

Back in Cyprus

So, after a lengthy travel day of Pittsburgh to Toronto to Athens to Larnaca, I arrived in Cyprus on Monday. I really did not do much other than check into a hotel and wait for Bill to arrive. Once he … Continue reading ?

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