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Settled in Larnaka

So, Sunday we got up, packed up the car, and headed over to Larnaka. Along the way, we took a break and stopped for lunch at one of our favorite spots, Zygi. As I have mentioned many times before, this is … Continue reading ?

Looters dig up Petersburg National Battlefield

Just in time for Memorial Day, the National Park Service has discovered extensive looting of the Petersburg National Battlefield in Virginia. Rangers found a large number of pits dug by treasure hunters looking to steal Civil War artifacts. They likely used metal detectors to discover small, easily removed and carried objects like uniform buttons, buckles [...]

Ancient gold wreath kept in a box under the bed

On June 9th, Duke’s of Dorchester auction house will be selling an ancient gold myrtle wreath kept for years in a box under a bed in Somerset. Duke’s appraiser Guy Schwinge went to the cottage to examine some of the belongings of the elderly resident. He was amazed when the owner pulled a busted old [...]

The Father of Quality Lager reborn

Humans have been brewing beer since at least 6000 B.C. in Mesopotamia — a study was just published a few days ago revealing a 5,000-year-old recipe for beer derived from residue inside pottery found in China’s Shaanxi province — but for thousands of years the chemical processes of fermentation were mysterious. Ingredients varied widely, and [...]

Saturday in Polis

Things are a bit slow at Polis, I am heading to Larnaka tomorrow so there wasn’t a lot to do today. So Brandon, Dave, and I used the day as a chance to go to Paphos and visit some of the … Continue reading ?

Last Friday in Polis

Things are winding down in Polis for 2016 for me – we leave Sunday for a week of work at PKAP in Larnaka. I finished looking at pottery yesterday, both pieces in the museum and what we had stored at … Continue reading ?

Neanderthals built stalagmite circles 175,000 years ago

The entrance to the Bruniquel Cave in southwest France collapsed in prehistoric times, sealing off the cave from the Pleistocene until determined local speleologists dug their way through in 1990. Inside the cave just 336 meters (1102 feet) from the entrance, they found two circular structures made of whole and broken stalagmites. Archaeologists carefully documented [...]

10 Days to Go

Time is flying by, I only have til Sunday in Polis and then we head to Larnaka to do some PKAP work next week, mainly cataloguing and illustrating artifacts. Today I drove Bill and David to the airport, they are … Continue reading ?

Altar cloth may be sole surviving Elizabeth I gown

Speaking of Queen Elizabeth I, Historic Royal Palaces (HRP) curators think an altar cloth from St Faith’s Church in Bacton, Herefordshire, may be the only known surviving piece of one of the monarch’s famously elaborate gowns. There is no conclusive proof that the cross-shaped piece of fabric once belonged to the queen herself, but there’s [...]

Help save the Drake Armada Portrait of Elizabeth I

The Art Fund and Royal Museums Greenwich have launched a campaign to buy the iconic Armada Portrait of Queen Elizabeth I before it’s put up for public auction. The Art Fund has contributed £1 million ($1,461,000) and Royal Museums Greenwich £400,000 ($584,000), its entire annual acquisitions budget, but that’s just the tip of the iceberg. [...]

Starting to Feel the Pressure

I am always amazed at how each season in Cyprus goes the same way. When I first get to the island, everything is nice and relaxed and I look forward to how much work I will be able to accomplish. … Continue reading ?

Mug at Auschwitz hid jewelry for 70+ years

Staff at the Auschwitz Museum have discovered one person’s cherished treasures hidden under the false bottom of a mug for more than 70 years. The mug is one of more than 12,000 pieces of enameled kitchenware — pots, bowls, kettles, cups — in the museum’s collection, the quotidian things people brought with them when being [...]

Destruction of the Roman Middle Class: An analogy for America Today?

There have been many books written about the decline of the Roman Empire and the factors that made it happen. Gibbon stands out as the first writer to put significant effort toward the subject with his six volume opus first published in 1776. Show More Summary

Thousands of historic cosmetic, hygiene products digitized

Included in the National Museum of American History’s enormous collection of 90,000 artifacts in the Division of Medicine and Science are more than 2,200 historic cosmetic, hygiene and personal care products. Most of them have never been on display and outside of museum curators, people don’t even know they’re there. Thanks to a grant from [...]

Huge medieval cemetery found under Cambridge College

Archaeologists excavating under the Old Divinity School of St John’s College, Cambridge, have discovered one of the largest medieval cemeteries in Britain. The first remains on the site were found during renovations to the college’s Victorian building from 2010 to 2012. The discovery was kept under wraps until 2015, when Cambridge announced that archaeologists had [...]

Sunday

So, today is the halfway point for my time in Cyprus. I have been here for two weeks and have two more to go. Today was a day off, so to speak. We used the day to show our friend … Continue reading ?

Review: The Last Roman: Triumph

A history resource article by Mary Harrsch © 2016The final chapters of Flavius Belisarius' life are the focus of Jack Ludlow's third and final installment in his series "The Last Roman" subtitled "Triumph". In the second book, "The Last...Show More Summary

Saturday

Not much new has happened. A normal day at the apotheke yesterday working on refining some of my initial pottery reading. I also started illustrating some of the pieces we pulled for inventorying. I am still sort of slow at this, … Continue reading ?

US returns stolen Columbus letter to Italy

A rare printed copy of Christopher Columbus’ letter describing what the people and placed he’d found on his famous transatlantic voyage that was stolen from the Riccardiana Library in Florence, Italy, has been found in the Library of Congress and returned to Italy. Nobody knows exactly when the red leather-bound volume that included the letter [...]

Louvre and Rijksmuseum co-parent Rembrandt portraits

Marten Soolmans (1613-1641) was the son of a wealthy Calvinist sugar refiner who had fled Antwerp and the wars of religion for Amsterdam in 1585. In 1628, Marten, then just 15 years old, went to college in Leiden where he studied law and met a young painter named Rembrandt Van Rijn. Jurisprudence didn’t work out, [...]

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