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Roman coin found in Sandby fort posthole

Archaeologists have found a Roman gold coin in a posthole from one of the homes in Sandby ringfort. The coin is a solidus from the reign of Western Roman Emperor Valentinian III in a design struck towards the latter part of his rule, 440-455 A.D. This is a find of great importance for Sandby, because [...]

Catching Up with Cambyses’ Lost Army

Longtime readers of rogueclassicism will recall a short series of posts dealing with claims about Cambyses’ army which supposedly disappeared in the Egyptian desert lo those many years ago: Cambyses’ Lost Army Found? Don’t Eat That Elmer … (November,2009) Cambyses Lost Army? The Plot Thickens …(January, 2010) Cambyses’ Lost Army Redux (August 2013; more about […]

Stephen Fine and YU Students Tracking the Temple Menorah

When last we heard about Stephen Fine and his crack teams of Yeshiva University students, they were detecting the colour of the Temple Menorah on the Arch of Titus (The Golden Menorah on the Arch of Titus). Now the WSJ reports on their activities checking into the semi-frequent claims that the Temple Menorah, after the […]

Augustan Stables to be Reburied?

From the Telegraph … skipping a bit: Now, to mark the two millennia since his death in 14AD, a successful exhibition has been staged in Rome and Paris, while on Rome’s Palatine Hill newly restored rooms at Augustus’ house and elaborate frescoes in a dining area will go on display for the first time. But […]

Bryn Mawr Classical Reviews ~ 08/18/14

The latest: 2014.08.29:  Sten Ebbesen, John Marenbon, Paul Thom, Aristotle’s Categories in the Byzantine, Arabic and Latin Traditions. Scientia Danica: Series H, Humanistica 8, vol. 5. 2014.08.28:  Jason König, Katerina Oikonomopoulou, Greg Woolf, Ancient Libraries. Show More Summary

Skeletons found in ancient Gallic grain silo

The skeletal remains of eight people have been unearthed in an ancient grain silo in Marsal, a town in the northeastern French region of Lorraine. The skeletons date to around 500 B.C. and were unceremoniously tossed into the silo so archaeologists found the bodies stacked on top of each other in random positions. Two of [...]

Guercino masterpiece stolen from Modena church

A 17th century Baroque masterpiece by Giovanni Francesco Barbieri, better known by his nickname Guercino, has been stolen from the Church of San Vincenzo in the historic center of Modena. The painting, Madonna with the Saints John the Evangelist and Gregory Thaumaturgus, was painted by the master in 1639 and has been in the church [...]

Review: Wolves Of The North by Harry Sidebottom

A history resource article by Mary Harrsch © 2014 In Book Five of Dr. Harry Sidebottom's best-selling series, we find my favorite "Warrior of Rome", Marcus Claudius Ballista venturing even further north into the Asian steppe on a mission to deflect a potential alliance between the various tribes living there and the Persian Empire. Show More Summary

Classics Confidential:

I’ve got a pile of these interviews to catch up on (18 or so! I’ll be spacing them out over the next week or so). In this one Constanze Güthenke talks about German Classical scholarship and reception over the past couple centuries or so …   here’s the official blurb: CC’s Anastasia Bakogianni caught up with […]

Bryn Mawr Classical Reviews ~ 08/16/15

[catching up …. again} 2014.08.25:  William Allan, Classical Literature: A Very Short Introduction. Very short introductions. 2014.08.24:  Averil Cameron, Dialoguing in Late Antiquity. Hellenic studies, 65. 2014.08.23:  Denise Demetriou, Negotiating Identity in the Ancient Mediterranean: The Archaic and Classical Greek Multiethnic Emporia. Show More Summary

Oeconomicus | (Subtle) Changes at rogueclassicism

Just so folks are aware, after a year or so trying to find an efficient way to deal with the ever-growing content in the Classical blogosphere (which I curate … I don’t just send everything out), I’ve finally figured out that such posts are best sent straight to Twitter. So if you have hitherto come […]

Travelling With Hadrian … Now in Game Form!

Tip o’ the pileus to Jessica Hughes of Classics Confidential fame for alerting us to this interesting little learning game from Emma-Jayne Graham at the Open University. How much do you know about Hadrian? Hadrian: The Roamin’ Emper...

Update: 200-year-old seltzer bottle contains alcohol

The 200-year-old salt-glazed stoneware bottle recovered from a shipwreck at the bottom of Gda?sk Bay off the coast of Poland does not contain its original prized mineral water from the internationally known springs of Selters, Germany. Or at least, that’s not all it contains. Testing at the J.S. Hamilton laboratory in Gdynia has found the [...]

Mummification in Egypt began 1,500 years earlier

Archaeologists have long believed that artificial mummification in Egypt began during the Old Kingdom, around 2,500 B.C. Mummies have been found from the Late Neolithic and Predynastic periods (ca. 4500 – 3100 B.C.), but they were thought to have been naturally mummified in the arid heat of the desert. Evidence for the use of embalming [...]

Official War Dept. art from Western Front digitized

When the United States joined World War I, the War Department commissioned eight accomplished artists to go to France with the American Expeditionary Forces and sketch what they saw. Illustrators William James Aylward, Walter Jack Duncan, Harvey Thomas Dunn, George Matthews Harding, Wallace Morgan, Harry Everett Townsend, architect and etcher J. André Smith, and illustrator [...]

Entrance to “extremely important” Amphipolis tomb found

Excitement is mounting in Greece over the excavation of a vast tomb atop Kasta hill in the ancient Central Macedonian city of Amphipolis. The Kasta Tumulus was first excavated in 2012, revealing a circular tomb almost 10 feet high (eroded from an estimated original height of 80 feet), 525 feet in diameter and 1,640 feet [...]

Brace Yourselves: News From Amphipolis is Coming …

There has been quite the buzz about ‘that tomb’ at Amphipolis over the past couple of days and what has made it to the press — both on the English side and the Greek — is somewhat confusing. To a very large extent, the coverage is much like that of last year’s (  Alexander the […]

Ancient instrument found in 7th c. Kazakhstan burial

Archaeologists have found an artifact they believe to be an ancient musical instrument in the burial of a Turkic warrior in the region of East Kazakhstan. The burial in the Altai mountains was found intact, with the remains of an adult male in his 40s at the time of death and those of a horse [...]

18th c. sculpture of Jesus has human teeth

Restorers from Mexico’s National Institute of Anthropology and History (INAH) working on a polychrome statue of the Christ of Patience have found eight human teeth in the figure’s mouth. These types of statues often have teeth, but they’re carved out of wood or bone either as a plate or as individual teeth. This is the [...]

World’s oldest eel dies at 155 in Swedish well

Sweden is in mourning today over the death of the world’s oldest eel. Åle the eel was around 155 years old when he left a country bereft, a prodigious age for the European eel Anguilla anguilla which in the wild typically lives around seven years in fresh water before returning to the ocean to spawn [...]

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