All Blogs / Academics / History / Ancient History / Popular


Michelangelo’s crucifix in 360 degrees

A painted wooden crucifix by Michelangelo Buonarrotti has returned to its original home, the Basilica of Santa Maria del Santo Spirito in Florence, after a fresh restoration and a year on the road. Carved by the artist when he was 18 or so, it’s one of his earliest extant works. Not the earliest, though, because [...]

Rich Roman finds surprise Dutch archaeologists

Archaeologists excavating the site of future construction in the eastern Dutch town of Tiel have an unearthed an unexpectedly large number of high quality Roman artifacts. Five archaeological companies and dozens of volunteers have been working assiduously to excavate a massive area the size of 36 soccer fields by their October deadline. They started last [...]

Update on 18th c. scuttled ship found in Alexandria

There’s news about the large piece of an 18th century ship discovered on the Potomac riverfront in Alexandria, Virginia, in December of 2015. Archaeologists have been studying the 50-foot section of hull which was deliberately scuttled to fill waterfront property. Property records were able to narrow down the date of the ship’s burial to between [...]

Ancient mummy shroud found in museum storage

Curators at the National Museums Scotland have discovered a unique ancient mummy shroud folded up in brown postal paper in storage. Senior curator of Ancient Mediterranean collections Dr. Margaret Maitland found the shroud during the course of a thorough examination of the museum’s Egyptian collections in anticipation of a new permanent ancient Egyptian gallery opening [...]

Cape Fear’s first flushing toilet goes on display

A stone toilet bowl from the 18th century that is believed to be the first flushing toilet in the Cape Fear region of North Carolina has finally been given the pride of place it deserves at the Brunswick Town/Fort Anderson Historic Site after years of sad neglect in archaeological storage. The bowl was discovered by [...]

Sparta's Military Aims: Killing not Dying.

Nicolas Nicastro devoted an entire novel, Isle of Stone, to depicting the merciless fate of Spartans found guilty by their allegedly brutal society of the “crime” of cowardice. His account appears to have been based on Xenophon’s description of the fate of Spartan cowards. Show More Summary

LoC, Smithsonian buy Harriet Tubman photo

The previously unknown photograph of Harriet Tubman recently discovered in a carte-de-visite album compiled by Quaker abolitionist and educator Emily Howland has been acquired by the ideal owners: the Library of Congress and the Smithsonian’s Institution’s National Museum of African American History and Culture. The album was sold at a Swann Auction Galleries auction in [...]

Iron Age horse, chariot burial found in Yorkshire

Archaeologists have discovered an extremely rare Iron Age horse and chariot burial in Pocklington, East Yorkshire. The site of a planned housing development on Burnby Lane has been excavated since 2014 and it soon became evident that these homes were going to be built on a major Iron Age burial ground. (I will update this [...]

Mosaic floors, first remains of ancient city, found in France

An excavation on the site of a boarding school in Uzès, southern France, has unearthed ancient remains from the first 1st century B.C. through the 7th century and beyond into the Middle Ages. The most dramatic discovery is a pair of large mosaic floors of superlative quality from around the 1st century A.D. The aesthetic [...]

Medieval Jewish cemetery unearthed in Trastevere

Archaeologists have unearthed a medieval Jewish cemetery in the Trastevere neighborhood of Rome. The discovery was announced last week, but it was made over the course of six years of excavations done in conjunction with the restoration of the Palazzo Leonori, now the new headquarters of the Assicurazioni di Roma insurance company. It was under [...]

Review: Fortress of Spears by Anthony Riches

A historical resource article by Mary Harrsch © 2017As Anthony Riches' third novel in his "Empire" series begins, we find our protagonist Marcus, now known as Marcus Tribulus Corvus, preparing to attack the fortified encampment of the (fictional) rebel Selgovae chieftain, Calgus, and his warriors and allies, the fiercesome Venicones. Show More Summary

Gainsborough painting slashed by attacker back on dispay

On 2:15PM on Saturday, March 18th, 2017, Keith Gregory walked up to Mr and Mrs William Hallett by Thomas Gainsborough hanging in the British paintings room of London’s National Gallery and slashed it twice with a pointed metal object. The man was immediately apprehended by the Gallery Assistant with the aid of members of the [...]

V&A receives major Fabergé donation

The Victoria and Albert Museum (V&A) is the proud new owner of nine exceptional works by Carl Fabergé donated by the son of the late Kenneth Snowman, one of the world’s most prominent Fabergé experts. Two rare works by 18th century goldsmith Johann Christian Neuber were also part of the donation. Nicholas Snowman donated the [...]

Iconic Roman Holiday Vespa, oldest in the world, for sale

The iconic Vespa that supported the supple fundaments of Audrey Hepburn and Gregory Peck as they scootered their way through the Eternal City in the 1953 classic film Roman Holiday is currently for sale at the online auction site Catawiki. As if co-starring with two of the all-time greatest movie stars in one of the [...]

16th century acqueduct found in Italian hamlet

Two forestry workers have discovered a 16th century aqueduct in the southern Italian hamlet of Monte Cicerale. Franco Avenia and Edoardo Palumbo were clearing underbrush and brambles in a wooded area above the highway when they stumbled across a small stone structure partially embedded into a hillside. A square opening in the structure led to [...]

Vindolanda toilet seat to get setting worthy of its greatness

The Roman fort and settlement of Vindolanda just south of Hadrian’s Wall in Northumberland is perhaps best known for the 1,700 wooden writing tablets from the 1st and 2nd centuries A.D. that have been found there, preserved for 2,000 years in the site’s anaerobic soil. Because of the unique insight this record of daily correspondence [...]

Earliest color movies of the White House found

Researchers have discovered the earliest known color movies of the White House in the archives of the Herbert Hoover Presidential Museum-Library in West Branch, Iowa. We owe these precious glimpses of First Family life to First Lady Lou Henry Hoover, an enormously accomplished woman — Stanford graduate, world traveler, co-translator with her husband of a [...]

Earliest European burial in Asia-Pacific found in Taiwan

Archaeologists have discovered the remains of 17th century Christian burial on a Taiwanese island. This is the earliest European burial ever discovered in the Asia-Pacific region. Under the direction of María Cruz Berrocal from the University of Konstanz in Germany, the archaeological team has excavated the site on the island of Heping Dao in northern [...]

Barberini tapestries return 16 years after fire almost destroyed them

The Life of Christ tapestries have made their triumphant return to public view for the first time since a 1981 fire almost reduced these precious 17th century masterpieces to cinders. As of March 21st, they are hanging in the Cathedral Church of St. John the Divine in Manhattan. It has taken a decade and a [...]

Treasure of Ming Dynasty uprising leader found

Archaeologists have discovered a massive treasure from a 17th century shipwreck in Meishan City in the Sichuan Province of southwest China. The ship sank where the Jinjiang River branches off from the Minjiang River in 1646, and with it plunged more than 10,000 gold, silver and bronze coins, ingots, jewels, gold artifacts and weapons including [...]

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC