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St. Louis Society board resigns over artifact sales

Last fall, the St. Louis Society (SLS) of the American Institute for Archaeology (AIA) caused a stir when it put the Treasure of Harageh up for auction at Bonhams, London. The collection of Twelfth Dynasty jewelry and vessels were unearthed by a British School of Archaeology team excavating in Middle Egypt during the 1913-14 season [...]

Winchester Cathedral opens mortuary chests

The great Gothic Cathedral of Winchester, in Hampshire, England, is traditionally held to be the final resting place of some of the earliest kings of Wessex and England. The remains of kings and bishops from as early as the 7th century are said to be contained in decorated mortuary chests in the church’s Lady Chapel. [...]

Remains of ancient mound in Ohio found during mall construction

In 2008, a small mound on North Bridge Street in Chillicothe, Ohio, was bulldozed by commercial developers. There was no archaeological survey of the site, despite Ohio’s rich history of ancient Native American mounds, because sadly there are no laws even slowing people down from destroying ancient remains on private property. Whatever development plans were [...]

Have only surviving Michelangelo bronzes been found?

A pair of bronze statuettes known as the Rothschild Bronzes have been attributed to Michelangelo by an international team of multi-disciplinary experts at the University of Cambridge’s Fitzwilliam Museum. The bronzes are 16 inches wide by 2 feet 7.5 inches high and depict heroic male nudes riding panthers, likely a Bacchic procession theme. They are [...]

Only known recording of Alexander Graham Bell on display

The only known recording of Alexander Graham Bell’s voice is going on display at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of American History in Washington, D.C., along with other early experimental recordings from Bell’s Volta Laboratory Associates. The exhibition “Hear My Voice”: Alexander Graham Bell and the Origins of Recorded Sound opened on January 26th and runs [...]

Review: Hero of Rome by Douglas Jackson

A historical fiction review by Mary Harrsch © 2015 When I first met Gaius Valerius Verrens in the opening chapters of "Hero of Rome" by Scottish author Douglas Jackson, he was leading his cohort into a Silurian hill fort bristling with Celtic spears on a hilltop in Nero's Roman Britain. Show More Summary

Sketch of Van Gogh found in friend’s scrapbook

A previously unknown sketch of painter Vincent van Gogh has been found in an album of drawings by his friend Emile Bernard. The album, a collection of the French artist’s sketches cut out of other books and then pasted into a used accounts ledger, has been in the archive of the Bremen Kunsthalle museum in [...]

Sparta's Ancient Roots: Homer's Helen

Helen of Sparta – What Homer’s Helen tells us about Sparta Raphael Sealey in his study Women and Law in Classical Greece (Chapel Hill: 1990) makes a strong case that the marriage customs and status of women as portrayed in the works of Homer are incompatible with customs in classical Athens. Show More Summary

British Columbia library acquires 13th c. Papal bull

The University of British Columbia Library has acquired what may be the oldest document of its kind in Canada: a Papal bull issued by Pope Innocent IV in 1245. The ink on parchment manuscript was signed by the Pope and 13 cardinals, among them Giovanni Gaetano Orsini, recently appointed Cardinal-Deacon of the titular church of [...]

Ancient Siberian trepanation recreated

A multi-disciplinary team of scientists at the Institute of Archaeology and Ethnography, part of the Russian Academy of Science’s Siberian branch, have recreated the ancient trepanation technique of the nomadic people who inhabited the Altai region of western Siberia between the 6th and early 2nd centuries B.C. Show More Summary

Coffin initialed “M.C.” found in Cervantes search

The team of archaeologists and anthropologists searching for the remains of Miguel de Cervantes in the crypt of Madrid’s Convent of the Barefoot Trinitarians have found fragments of a casket with the initials “M.C.” on one of the pieces. The partial casket was found in one of the niches in the north wall along with [...]

Spain planned to invade Australia with an armada

Documents discovered in the archives of the Spanish navy reveal that Spain planned to invade the nascent British colony in Australia in the mid-1790s. Chris Maxworthy, vice president of the Australian Association for Maritime History (AAMH), found the documents detailing a plan of attack approved by King Carlos IV to fire “hot shot” cannons, cannons [...]

Civilization Timelines Keep Getting Earlier

Anyone studying the origins of human civilization on earth is aware of the earlier, earlier, earlier start-dates archaeologists are citing. The reasons are basically the discovery of previously unexplored sites and the enhanced technology enabling more precise dating of artifacts. Show More Summary

Guest Post ~ Ursula Rothe: Prince Philip May Well Be Caligula’s Horse

A guest post by Ursula Rothe (Baron Thyssen Lecturer in Classical Studies at the Open University): The Prime Minister of Australia Tony Abbott has awarded a knighthood to Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh. The Australian public and the world media have reacted to the news with a mixture of incredulity and dismay. Incredulity, because […]

Samuel Morse the artist

Before Samuel Morse developed the code that bears his name and patented the electromagnetic telegraph, he was a painter and a successful one at that. His teacher, Washington Allston, known today primarily for his Romantic landscapes, took the 20-year-old Samuel to study painting in England in 1811. In London he was admitted to the Royal [...]

Were Cervantes’ bones under piles of old books?

Last April, the Convent of the Barefoot Trinitarians in Madrid, burial place of Miguel de Cervantes, author of The Adventures of the Ingenious Nobleman Don Quixote of La Mancha, one the most important books in the Western literary canon, was scanned with ground-penetrating radar in the first phase of a search for the iconic writer’s [...]

Mons Meg leaves Edinburgh Castle for tune-up

Mons Meg, the six-ton 15th century cannon that guards the parapets of Edinburgh Castle, has left her post for the first time in 30 years. Before dawn on Monday, January 19th, a crew of specialists strapped Meg up so she could be gingerly lifted her out of her carriage by a crane, loaded onto a [...]

CFP: Exploring Roman Comedy and Its Reception

Submitted for posting:   Call for Papers: Graduate & Undergraduate Students Class Acts II: Exploring Roman Comedy and its Reception March 21-22 2015 University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh PA   Send anonymous abstracts of 500 or fewer words to pittclassicsevents AT gmail.com by February 16, 2015. Keynote address: Sharon L. James, PhD University of North Carolina, Chapel […]

Tut’s beard glued back on like a bad craft project

The AP reported on Thursday that the false beard on the gold funerary mask of Tutankhamun, probably the single most recognizable ancient artifact in the world, had come off and was reattached with a sloppy mess of irreversible epoxy glue. Cited in the article are three conservators at the Cairo Museum, all unnamed due to [...]

New Research on Peruvian High-Elevation "Lost City"

Choquequirao is a truly “lost city,” abandoned around 1572 when the last Inca ruler, Tupac Amaru, was captured in the distant jungles, dragged back to Cusco and executed by Spanish colonial authorities. Choquequirao’s ancient houses,...Show More Summary

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