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The Original Molly Pitcher

23 minutes agoHistory / US History : Boston 1775

As quoted yesterday, two publications from 1835—one in English and one in German—appear to be the first print appearances of the name “Molly Pitcher” in stories about a female artillerist at the Battle of Monmouth.But that name had already...Show More Summary

National Trust acquires iconic Jacobean miniature

The National Trust has acquired a very fine early 17th century miniature by Isaac Oliver for £2.1 million ($2,760,000), a new record for a British miniature. The miniature is widely acknowledged as one of the greatest British examples of the art form. It has been on display at the Powis Castle in Powys, Wales, which [...]

The Legend of Molly Pitcher—A New Source

Since I was on a Battle of Monmouth kick, I’ll jump to one of the most enduring American legends to come out of that fight: Molly Pitcher. As Ray Raphael wrote in Founding Myths and this article for the Journal of the American Revolution, there’s solid evidence of a woman helping her husband in the Continental artillery at that battle. Show More Summary

4,200 yr-old rattle found in Turkey

Archaeologists excavating the Acemhöyük excavation site in central Turkey have unearthed a clay rattle that dates to the early Bronze Age. It has not been radiocarbon dated yet, but the layer in which it was found dates to around 2200 B.C. which makes the toy one of the oldest rattles ever found. Made out of [...]

Etruscan stele names goddess Uni

The inscribed Etruscan stele discovered in the ancient settlement of Poggio Colla earlier this year has yielded an exciting name: Uni, a fertility/mother goddess who was the Etruscan equivalent of the Greco-Roman goddesses Hera and Juno. She may have been the goddess worshipped at the temple. Other finds made at Poggio Colla, most famously a [...]

A Nazi's Documentary Photographs of the Forced Removal of Polish Jews, 1940

Historian Julia Werner discovered this set of photos in the Jewish Museum in Rendsburg, Germany, and they constitute one of the only visual records we have of the construction of an open-air ghetto. Taken on June 16, 1940, by GermanShow More Summary

“Howard Johnson’s” on Steinwehr Avenue Deconstruction

During the Civil War Centennial (late 1950s-early 1960s) Steinwehr Avenue became the home to motels and restaurants which were built to accommodate the millions of visitors that poured into Gettysburg during that time. The Howard Johnson’s was one of those structures. Show More Summary

The Road to Concord Goes Through Washington, D.C.

Next week I’m traveling to Washington, D.C., for a couple of talks about The Road to Concord.On Wednesday, 31 August, at 6:00 P.M. I’ll speak at Anderson House, the museum and library of the Society of the Cincinnati in Dupont Circle.The...Show More Summary

Dona Militaria: Rome's Lost Valor

One of nine Silvered bronze phalerae depicting a mythological figure (Zeus Ammon)awarded to Titus Flavius Festus Roman 1st century CE. Photographed at theNeuses Museum in Berlin, Germany by Mary Harrsch © 2016 A history resource article by Mary Harrsch © 2016A few months ago I visited the Neues Museum in Berlin, Germany. Show More Summary

Slaveholding in Robert E. Lee’s Army

The latest issue of the Journal of the Civil War Era (September 2016) includes Joseph Glatthaar’s Robert Fortenbaugh Memorial Lecture, which compares the cultures in the Army of the Potomac and Army of Northern Virginia. The essay includes a number of helpful graphs, including the one above, which shows that slaveholders were over represented in […]

Civil War veteran to be buried in family plot, not in military cemetery

Distant relatives of Pvt. Jewett Williams, a Civil War soldier whose ashes were carried cross-county by a motorcycle relay from Oregon to Maine this month, will bury their ancestor in a family plot rather than have him buried in a national military cemetery as previously announced. The burial, with full military honors, is now scheduled […]

A James Wilson Memorial Award for Gen. Charles Lee

When I saw the movie musical 1776 during the Bicentennial, it left me with a strong impression of James Wilson. He was the Pennsylvania delegate to the Continental Congress shown casting the decisive vote for independence. In the movie...Show More Summary

National Park Service Celebrates 100 Years

Today the National Park Service celebrates 100 years. Thank you for providing me with hundreds of hours of self reflection about our history and what it means to be a citizen of the United States. Thank you to all my friends who have devoted their careers to preserving our most important historic and natural landmarks […]

10 Questions with Akhil Reed Amar

The author of The Constitution Today extols the relevance of a document so essential that he carries three copies

Six Neolithic flint axes reunited in Denmark

It was the recent discovery of the sixth axe that set the wheels in motion for its reunion with its five brethren, but the story begins in 1930 when a farmer discovered a Neolithic flint axe in a field near Snostrup on the Roskilde Fjord in southwestern Denmark. The axe was 27 centimeters (10.6 inches) [...]

Crusader-era grenade in group of artifacts turned in to authorities

A group of artifacts recently turned in to the Israel Antiquities Authority (IAA) include a striking embossed hand grenade from the Crusader era. The objects were collected by the late Marcel Mazliah who worked at the Orot Rabin power station in Hadera on the northwest Mediterranean coast of Israel since it was built in 1973. [...]

Ben Hur 2016: Definitely Not A Blast From The Past!

A history resource article by Mary Harrsch © 2016Last week I went to see the new Ben-Hur remake on opening day. I realize the producers had a very narrow religious agenda but I had to see for myself since historical films about the ancient world have been in such short supply lately. Show More Summary

Charles Lee on a Fatal Sunday

Mount Vernon just shared an interview with Mark Edward Lender and Garry Wheeler Stone about their recently published book, Fatal Sunday: George Washington, the Monmouth Campaign, and the Politics of Battle. Here’s the authors’ positive appraisal of how Gen. Show More Summary

“A Black Person Voting for Trump is Like a Slave Fighting for the Confederacy”

This is a wonderful complement to the previous post on the politics of the black Confederate myth. Today in the Hartford Courant Frank Harris III makes the case that a black man voting for Trump is as unlikely as black men fighting for the Confederacy in March 1865. This certainly plays loose with some of […]

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