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A 17th-Century Argument for the Many Virtues of Coffee, Chocolate, and Tea

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. In this 1690 broadside advertisement, London merchant Samuel Price deployed rumor and vivid anecdote to advance the medical case for drinking coffee, chocolate, and tea. Show More Summary

How to Employ Women in Government Jobs: Postwar Advice Drawn From the American Experience

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. At the end of World War II, writes archivist David Langbart on the...Show More Summary

Ringing bells to mark anniversary of end of the Civil War

On April 9 at 3:15 p.m., thousands of bells, large and small. are expected to ring out in commemoration of the 150th anniversary of Gen. Robert E. Lee’s surrender at Appomattox, Va. Although not the official end of the Civil War, many Americans consider it the symbolic end of the fighting.Read full article >>

Benin Empire: The Splendor of Pre-Colonial...

The Benin Empire was one of the powerful, pre-colonial African states known for its splendor its rejection of the transatlantic slave trade, and European dominance.

Map Shows Where the Juvenile Delinquents Lived in Depression-Era D.C.

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. This 1936 map of Washington, D.C. pinpoints residencies that hadShow More Summary

RepiTitiationes ~ 03.27.15

2nd Classics Seminar 2015: Dr Graeme Miles presents ‘a Sophist on Sophists: Philostratus’ Vita Sophistarum’. Hum 477A, 4pm. — UTAS Classics (@ClassicsUTAS) March 27, 2015 festinate: verb tr., intr.: To hurry or hasten. adjective: Hurried or hasty. Show More Summary

RepiTitiationes ~ 03.26.15

Vercingetorix surrenders, Lego style. pic.twitter.com/95iShuKsdD — Mr. Lasater (@MBLatinNerd) March 26, 2015 #latin How did you learn (or how are you learning) Latin? http://t.co/6MHDdPAGg3 #LatinLanguage — LatinD.com (@LatinDiscussion)...Show More Summary

RepiTitiationes ~ 03.25.15

Labels of these genitives? http://t.co/d1iuZBHAfU #latin #LatinGrammar — LatinD.com (@LatinDiscussion) March 25, 2015 #quoteoftheday House of Atreus are like the characters of the Marvel Universe. They turn up in each others' stories with a new backstory. — Dominic Mercer (@dom_mercer) March 25, 2015 quid tibi dolet? (What hurts) Identify the parts of the body in […]

RepiTitiationes ~ 03.24.15

@museiincomune whoops… I meant caracalla pic.twitter.com/C8SG2Q6mPD — rogueclassicist (@rogueclassicist) March 24, 2015 Bellum Dacicum – Trajan's Dacian Wars in a survey by NatGeo:… http://t.co/ChyNJtr2jf — Lindsay Powell (@Lindsay_Powell) March 24, 2015 This Greek pair of eyes was once set in the sockets of an over-lifesize statue. Show More Summary

More “Black Regiments” in Eighteenth-Century Massachusetts Culture

In the 1760s, friends of the British royal government in Massachusetts such as Peter Oliver (shown here) claimed that James Otis, Jr., had spoken of the value of having a “black Regiment” of clergymen on his side in political disputes. Show More Summary

Nifty Methods for Smuggling Contraband, From a Manual for WWII-Era British Spies 

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. The Descriptive Catalogue of Special Devices and Supplies, used by...Show More Summary

Rare Earl of Lancaster devotional panel found on Thames riverbank

Archaeologists from the Museum of London Archaeology (MOLA) have unearthed a rare 14th century devotional panel dedicated to the death of rebel-turned-martyr Thomas, 2nd Earl of Lancaster. The team was excavating the north bank of the Thames near London Bridge in advance of construction in 2000 when they found the rare piece in a medieval [...]

FDR’s First Draft of His “Day of Infamy” Speech, With His Notes

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. Following the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor, Franklin Roosevelt drafted his Dec. Show More Summary

An Early Arctic Explorer's Dramatic Drawings of the Frozen North

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. Arctic explorer Sir John Ross drew these images while captaining the first 19 th -century British search for the Northwest Passage. Show More Summary

An Inventory of Robert E. Lee’s Personal Property, Left in His Mansion and Seized by the Government

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. Union soldiers occupied Arlington House, Robert E. Lee’s home in Virginia, soon after the beginning of the Civil War. Show More Summary

Spin a 3-D Representation of a Beautiful 17th-Century Celestial Globe 

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. The 1603 Sphaera stellifera globe by Willem Janszoon Blaeu showcases cutting-edge 17 th -century astronomy in three dimensions. Show More Summary

Late-1940s Chicago CSI, in Photos

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. A new book of classic crime photos from the Chicago Tribune, Gangsters & Grifters, contains a few interesting shots of late-1940s forensic science. Show More Summary

A Detailed, Majestic Diagram of Two British Ships of War, From an 18th-Century Encyclopedia

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. This illustration, used to demonstrate the rigging and interior setup of first- and third-rate British ships of war, appeared in Ephraim Chambers’ Cyclopedia, published in 1728. Show More Summary

Handprints of Hitler, Mussolini, and FDR, Analyzed by a Palm Reader in 1938

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. In a 1938 book, How to Know People By Their Hands, palmist JosefShow More Summary

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