Discover a new way to find and share stories you'll love… Learn about Reading Desk

All Blogs / Academics / History / Popular


Get More Specific:

A commemoration of the end of slavery

A free commemoration of the 150th anniversary of the U.S. House’s passage of the 13th Amendment will be held on the anniversary of that date, Jan. 31, at 2 p.m. at the New York Avenue Presbyterian Church  in Washington, D.C., where President Abraham Lincoln and his wife worshipped. The amendment was adopted Dec. 18, 1865.Read full article >>

The Brandy Station Foundation and its wrongheaded lack of focus….

An article on the Graffiti House appeared in Saturday, January 24’s edition of the Culpeper Star Exponent. The article discusses the fact that more soldier graffiti has been found at the Graffiti House. If you read the article, you will...Show More Summary

Tea Merchant Cyrus Baldwin Has Too Much Tea

Longtime Boston 1775 readers might recognize the name “Chris the Woburnite” in the comments, usually attached to choice observations and stories from that old Middlesex County town. In real life that’s Chris Hurley, Revolutionary reenactor and researcher. Show More Summary

Guest Post ~ Ursula Rothe: Prince Philip May Well Be Caligula’s Horse

A guest post by Ursula Rothe (Baron Thyssen Lecturer in Classical Studies at the Open University): The Prime Minister of Australia Tony Abbott has awarded a knighthood to Prince Philip, the Duke of Edinburgh. The Australian public and the world media have reacted to the news with a mixture of incredulity and dismay. Incredulity, because […]

Samuel Morse the artist

Before Samuel Morse developed the code that bears his name and patented the electromagnetic telegraph, he was a painter and a successful one at that. His teacher, Washington Allston, known today primarily for his Romantic landscapes, took the 20-year-old Samuel to study painting in England in 1811. In London he was admitted to the Royal [...]

Help save the battlefield at Trevilian Station!

I’ve known about this for months, but I was sworn to secrecy. I was involved in identifying these parcels and in determining their historic significance. I’m finally able to discuss some great news with you. The Battle of Trevilian Station lasted two long, hot, bloody days. Show More Summary

James Kirke Paulding provides a window to the early nineteenth century Shenandoah

In digging backwards from the Civil War, through the literature that mentions the Shenandoah Valley, I came upon a great work written by James Kirke Paulding. In 1816, Paulding ventured into the Valley and apparently stuck around a bit, providing some details as to what he encountered. So, what is the value of reading experiences […]

Two Different Samuel Adamses

This is Samuel Adams. In 1773 he was fifty-one years old. His father had been a selectman, merchant, and church deacon. He had gone to Harvard College and earned a master’s degree. As a young man he had helped to found a short-lived newspaper, which honed his writing skills, and discovered that he had no interest or luck in business. Show More Summary

Were Cervantes’ bones under piles of old books?

Last April, the Convent of the Barefoot Trinitarians in Madrid, burial place of Miguel de Cervantes, author of The Adventures of the Ingenious Nobleman Don Quixote of La Mancha, one the most important books in the Western literary canon, was scanned with ground-penetrating radar in the first phase of a search for the iconic writer’s [...]

Upcoming Events at the Royall House

The Royall House and Slave Quarters in Medford will host a series of book talks on the history of slavery in America over the next three months. Thursday, 5 February, 7:00 P.M.Interpreting Slavery at Museums and Historic Sites This event...Show More Summary

New to the Civil War Memory Library, 01/25

The following list includes advanced reader copies, books sent directly from the author or books purchased through my Amazon affiliate account. I am currently reading Martha Hodes’s new book and I can’t recommend it enough. She is a wonderful storyteller. Megan L. Bever & Scott A. Suarez eds., The Historian behind the History: Conversations with […]

Mons Meg leaves Edinburgh Castle for tune-up

Mons Meg, the six-ton 15th century cannon that guards the parapets of Edinburgh Castle, has left her post for the first time in 30 years. Before dawn on Monday, January 19th, a crew of specialists strapped Meg up so she could be gingerly lifted her out of her carriage by a crane, loaded onto a [...]

CFP: Exploring Roman Comedy and Its Reception

Submitted for posting:   Call for Papers: Graduate & Undergraduate Students Class Acts II: Exploring Roman Comedy and its Reception March 21-22 2015 University of Pittsburgh Pittsburgh PA   Send anonymous abstracts of 500 or fewer words to pittclassicsevents AT gmail.com by February 16, 2015. Keynote address: Sharon L. James, PhD University of North Carolina, Chapel […]

William Russell’s Toasts on Offer

Last month I quoted an 1874 profile of William Russell that contained a description of a “Sons of Liberty” medal, worn by Boston activists on public occasions. Noting that no example of such a medal survives and no other source describes...Show More Summary

Tut’s beard glued back on like a bad craft project

The AP reported on Thursday that the false beard on the gold funerary mask of Tutankhamun, probably the single most recognizable ancient artifact in the world, had come off and was reattached with a sloppy mess of irreversible epoxy glue. Cited in the article are three conservators at the Cairo Museum, all unnamed due to [...]

New Research on Peruvian High-Elevation "Lost City"

Choquequirao is a truly “lost city,” abandoned around 1572 when the last Inca ruler, Tupac Amaru, was captured in the distant jungles, dragged back to Cusco and executed by Spanish colonial authorities. Choquequirao’s ancient houses,...Show More Summary

Jim Downs Comes to the Defense of John Stauffer

We can now add Jim Downs to the list of historians who has decided to wade into the debate about the existence of black Confederate soldiers. Rather than directly engage Stauffer’s claims, however, Downs offers a meta-analysis of my response. He begins by mis-characterizing my own view by suggesting that I believe there were no […]

The Wolf off Wall Street

I still haven’t whittled that blog post down to size. In fact it’s now bigger. Meantime here’s another something on the web: a TLS essay I wrote on Martin Wolf’s The Shifts and the Shocks. There’s no paywall. Here’s a snippet, which provides the piece its rather nice illustration: In the 2011 film Margin Call, […]

Copyright © 2011 Regator, LLC