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The Leftist Take-Over of College Board

Conservatives such as Stanley Kurtz can’t seem to say enough about the recent revisions made to College Board’s AP US History Curriculum. These changes will go into effect for this school year. Kurtz and others believe that the new curriculum reflects a dangerous turn to the left, though in the entire article the author fails... Continue reading

Wooden Toilet Seat from Vindolanda

From a Vindolanda Trust press release: Finding something that you can relate to is always a special moment on an archaeological dig. At Vindolanda this is a common occurrence, a site where the special qualities lie not only in the discovery of gold and silver or artefacts which relate to the military might of the […]

This Day in Ancient History: ante diem v kalendas septembres

ante diem v kalendas septembres rites in honour of Sol and Luna near the Circus Maximus 29 B.C. dedication of the ara Victoriae in the Curia 430 A.D. — death of St. Augustine 1797 — birth of Karl Otfried Muller (Classical scholar and archaeologist)

Vast archive of pre-war European Jewish life digitized

Photographer Roman Vishniac’s vast archive documenting Jewish life in Eastern Europe before and after World War II is being digitized and made available to the public. The joint project of the International Center of Photography (ICP) in New York and the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum in Washington, D.C., has already scanned almost 9,000 negatives [...]

“Rat-trap Adams’s argumentation”

(I keep finding mid-nineteenth-century stuff about Samuel “Rat-trap” Adams, putting off my promised discussion of his youth in the Revolutionary period. But I’ll get to that topic eventually.) In changing their form of government from a town to a city in 1822, Bostonians deprived political orators without office like Samuel Adams of a forum. Show More Summary

Alonzo Cushing, Harry Reese and the Issue over Medals of Honor. . .

Lt. Alonzo Cushing News broke last night that Lt. Alonzo Cushing will receive a Medal of Honor and the reaction from those in the Civil War community has thus far been overwhelmingly positive. "At long last," "finally," "it's about time"...these are just some of the common statements I have seen from bloggers and facebookers. Show More Summary

Camp Security saved, excavations begin

The only Revolutionary War POW camp to survive in undeveloped condition has been saved for posterity thanks to donations from the public. When I first wrote about Camp Security last April, the 47-acre plot in Springettsbury Township, Pennsylvania, between the city of York and the Susquehanna River, was in danger of being sold. More than [...]

Alonzo Cushing and the Medal of Honor

The soldier in the image is Lt. Alonzo Cushing, who is set to receive a Medal of Honor on September 15, 2014, 151+ years after his death at Gettysburg on July 3, 1863. Of the following facts, there is no dispute or doubt: Alonzo Cushing was a brave and very capable young soldier who died as a hero. Show More Summary

5K run to be held at Lincoln’s summer home

President Abraham Lincoln spent three of his presidential summers at what is now known as President Lincoln’s Cottage  on the grounds of the Armed Forces Retirement Home in Washington. The picturesque 250-acre grounds, which are rarely open to the public, will be used by runners participating in a 5K cross-country run on Sept. Show More Summary

ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, Confederate Heritage Version

You had to know that at some point we would see an ALS Ice Bucket Challenge video that included a Confederate flag. This is pretty much what I envisioned. Enjoy [Uploaded to YouTube on August 26, 2014]

Amphipolis Tomb Possibly Looted in Antiquity? I am Officially Confused!

In my precaffeinated minutes this a.m. I was jarred awake by a typically hyperbolating Daily Mail headline proclaiming: Game over for Greece’s mystery grave: Tomb raiders plundered site in antiquity – dashing hopes of finding artefacts dating back to Alexander the Great’s reign. Inter alia, a number of times the mantra was repeated, but here’s […]

Wire-Worker Adams at Boston’s Last Town Meetings

The wire-worker Samuel Adams was a prominent character in nineteenth-century Boston, as Kathryn Griffith described in her recent profile for the Bostonian Society. He started the century as town crier before going into the business of manufacturing screens and other wire objects. Show More Summary

This Day in Ancient History: ante diem vii kalendas septembres

ante diem vii kalendas septembres 55 B.C. — Julius Caesar invades Britain, but doesn’t stick around very long 1875 — Birth of John Buchan, 1st Baron of Tweedsmuir and Governor-General of Canada … and author of a decent biography of Augustus

Two Mayan cities found in Yucatan jungle

Archaeologists have discovered two lost Mayan cities in the jungle of the Calakmul Biosphere Reserve on the southeastern tip of Mexico’s Yucatán peninsula. The cities have been named Tamchén and Lagunita. Initial exploration indicates both cities were at their peak in the Late and Terminal Classic period (600-1000 AD), the early part of which saw [...]

Shameless self-promotion, part 906….

Time for some shameless self-promotion. Over the weekend, I signed off on the page galleys for my newest book, The Devil’s to Pay: John Buford at Gettysburg. A History and Walking Tour. The file has been sent to the printer, and in about...Show More Summary

Samuel Adams the Wire-worker

In two postings on the Bostonian Society’s blog, Kathryn Griffith just profiled Samuel Adams the wire-worker, source of the striped cloth in the society’s collection that’s become known as the “Liberty Tree Flag.”Harris wrote about this...Show More Summary

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