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Charles Lee on a Fatal Sunday

Mount Vernon just shared an interview with Mark Edward Lender and Garry Wheeler Stone about their recently published book, Fatal Sunday: George Washington, the Monmouth Campaign, and the Politics of Battle. Here’s the authors’ positive appraisal of how Gen. Show More Summary

“A Black Person Voting for Trump is Like a Slave Fighting for the Confederacy”

This is a wonderful complement to the previous post on the politics of the black Confederate myth. Today in the Hartford Courant Frank Harris III makes the case that a black man voting for Trump is as unlikely as black men fighting for the Confederacy in March 1865. This certainly plays loose with some of […]

Celebrating the National Park Service Centennial

On 25 August the National Park Service is celebrating the hundredth anniversary of the law that founded the agency. Parks are charging no fees on 25-28 August. In addition, many N.P.S. sites have special events planned. Not all those events relate to the Revolutionary period, even in greater Boston. Show More Summary

Tiny publisher to publish Voynich Manuscript facsimile

The Voynich Manuscript, a folio of mysterious illustrations and hand-written texts written in an unknown language or code, has been bedevilling linguists and cryptographers for almost 600 years. Radiocarbon dating of the book’s vellum leaves found it was produced between 1404 and 1438, and even though the ink cannot be dated at present, researchers believe [...]

These 1861 Photographs Helped Save America’s Wilderness

Carleton Watkins took these 30 images in 1861, and evidence suggests that they soon made their way to Abraham Lincoln

The Alliance Between America’s Black and Jewish Activists Has Long Been Troubled

An alliance between African American and Jewish American activists has endured for decades, but it has been troubled for just as long

Remembering General James Nagle On The 150th Anniversary Of His Death

General James NaglePictured Holding the Sword PresentedUpon His Return Home from the Mexican Warin 1848(Library of Congress) 150 years ago...sometime around 4:00 o’clock on the morning of Wednesday, August 22, 1866 in his home in Pottsville, Pennsylvania, and surrounded by his family.. Show More Summary

That ‘YOLO’ Mosaic from Hatay, Turkey … yeah … About That

Just yesterday I was muttering about not having enough time to blog but this story really needs some response because the media is getting it wrong and is (as of yesterday) possibly making it even worse. The initial story was in Hurriyet: Turkish historian ?lber Ortayl? has paid a visit to the excavation area in […]

Jackson on Calhoun and Clay

One Presidential candidate’s recent suggestion of a “Second Amendment” response to losing the election prompted a Twitter discussion of Presidents threatening violence to their opponents. I noted the precedent of a reported remark from Andrew Jackson: “My only regrets are that I never shot Henry Clay or hanged John C. Show More Summary

Guest Post: Eric Cline on ‘World War Zero or Zero World War’

We invited Eric Cline, author of 1177 BC: The Year Civilization Collapsed to comment on the recent media flurry occasioned by claims of a Bronze Age ‘World War Zero’. World War Zero or Zero World War? My Twitter feed and Google Alerts began exploding on Thursday afternoon. The headline from Popular Archaeology read: Scientists proclaim a […]

The Politics of the Black Confederate Myth

I don’t think this is going to surprise many of you. This is certainly not a scientific survey, but it does reinforce my own perceptions having to do with the political affiliations of people who believe that black men served as soldiers in the Confederate army, irrespective of race. I follow a couple of twitter […]

Problems with the ‘Scientific’ Dating of Sappho’s Midnight Poem

One of the greatest benefits of an education in Classics is that it teaches you two very important skills which serve you well no matter what field you happen to go into post-degree: critical thinking and source criticism. They work hand-in-hand, of course, and it is increasingly apparent that such skills are often lacking when […]

Aristotelian Skepticism: Is It Really His Tomb?

One of the things you get used to when you’re blogging things about the ancient world is that whenever there is some significant date for some significant ancient figure coming up, you can pretty much be sure that there will be some major — and usually ill-supported — discovery tied somehow to that event. Most […]

Hercules Room restoration begins

Thanks to a generous grant from the Silvano Toti Foundation, the Hercules Room of Rome’s Palazzo Venezia is now getting a much-needed restoration. The Palazzo Venezia was built in the middle of the 15th century at the behest of Cardinal Pietro Barbo, the future Pope Paul II. The stones used to build it were taken [...]

Review: The Siege (Book One of the Agent of Rome Series) by Nick Brown

A history resource article by Mary Harrsch © 2016At just 19-years old, Cassius Corbulo is probably the youngest centurion in the Roman Army. Has he won a civic crown or been the first over the wall of a besieged town? No. Actually, he...Show More Summary

Corn on Steroids

Don’t let these short stalks in the foreground fool you. The corn rides high in Gettysburg National Military Park this summer. The 8th New York Cavalry Monument is next to the tree in the background – closer to camera is the marker to the 3rd Division of the Army of the Potomac’s 1st Corps. This […] The post Corn on Steroids appeared first on Gettysburg Daily.

Quellenforschung du jour: The Daily Mail on a Hellenistic Wreath

From time to time I am asked why I link to the Daily Mail in my Explorator newsletter. As most folks are aware, the Daily Mail is a flashy, pop-culture-gossip-oriented  British newspaper which generally is looked askance upon by folks who are fans of serious journalism. Indeed, when it comes to news about archaeology and/or […]

Returning to the Gospel of Jesus’ Wife: Reflections and Implications (I)

As readers of rogueclassicism are probably already aware, a couple of weeks ago Ariel Sabar wrote a lengthy piece in the Atlantic documenting his successful search for the owner of the so-called Gospel of Jesus Wife, who we now know is a certain Walter Fritz. It’s a sequel to an earlier piece he wrote for […]

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