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What is the Purpose in Reconstructing the Hancock Avenue Gate?

Welcome to the next battle of Gettysburg. What should be the appearance and purpose of this and any other National Military Park? As part of the Cyclorama parking lot deconstruction there will be a structure placed along the Taneytown Road. Show More Summary

New to the Civil War Memory Library, 07/19

Announcement: Earlier today I learned that the University Press of Kentucky will bring Remembering The Battle of the Crater: War as Murder out in paperback next spring. I’ve been hoping for some time that they would do this and I couldn’t be more excited. I will provide additional information as it becomes available. Douglas R. […]

Taking Stock of Richard Stockton

Back in 2008 I wrote a series of postings about Richard Stockton, a judge from New Jersey who signed the Declaration of Independence in August 1776. Four months later he was in the custody of the British army. As I discussed in my first...Show More Summary

Museum acquires rare 17th c. stained glass window

M – Museum Leuven and the City of Leuven have acquired an early stained-glass window by 17th century Flemish master Jan de Caumont. Leuven was a center of stained glass production, and while the museum has an extensive collection of pieces from the 15th through the 19th century, it had no single important stained glass [...]

Old Cyclorama Parking Lot Deconstruction

The National Park Service is cutting down trees in the area of the old Cyclorama Center parking lot, which is now the National Cemetery Parking lot in order to reduce the size of the parking lot, to restore a ravine that was in this location at the time of the battle. This view was taken […] The post Old Cyclorama Parking Lot Deconstruction appeared first on Gettysburg Daily.

Conference planned on the Union’s fiery destruction of Shenandoah Valley

In 1864, the Union systematically destroyed the agricultural riches of the northern part of the Shenandoah Valley, leaving behind a starving population as winter closed in. This campaign against civilians marked a policy change in the then three-year-old war. The Burning is the subject of a one-day conference on Aug. 13 at James Madison University. […]

Fear Mongering With History

Over the weekend I heard a distinguished and recently retired Civil War historian lament the state of history education today. It’s not the first time that I have had to sit through such a doomsday scenario, but I don’t mind admitting that it was just a bit more painful given that it took place in […]

Visit the History List for Signed Books and More

The History List is an online resource of events at historical sites, tours, reenactments, conferences—whatever organizations choose to list.You can visit the site to see what’s coming up in your state or sign up for one of its weekly...Show More Summary

Must Farm excavation concludes

The excavation of the Bronze Age site of Must Farm in the Cambridgeshire Fens comes to an end this week, alas, but so many archaeological remains in exceptional condition have been found, they will be studied for years to come. The unique conditions of the site — round houses built on stilts on the Nene [...]

East Cemetery Hill Restoration Work

The Civil War Trust is tearing down a structure that they purchased on East Cemetery Hill. They are doing their part to restore the ground to the way that it looked in 1863 when this line was lightly defended by Ohio soldiers who were overrun by Louisiana soldiers on the evening of July 2, 1863. Show More Summary

Jerks, Shockers, and Lucky Dogs at the J.A.R.

The Journal of the American Revolution has just concluded one of its popular group interviews, in which chief editor Todd Andrlik asks a bunch of us contributors for our opinions on various questions. Sometimes we agree, sometimes there are almost as many answers as respondents. Show More Summary

A Weekend in Richmond with the Civil War Trust

Thanks to the Civil War Trust for hosting another incredible teacher institute in Richmond, Virginia. While this is my 5th year with the Trust it’s been a couple of years since my last visit. I especially enjoyed the chance to catch up with old friends and spend time with some of the most passionate teachers […]

Largest Anglo-Saxon building found in Scotland

Archaeologists and community volunteers excavating the site of Glebe Field in Aberlady, East Lothian, have discovered the foundations of an Anglo-Saxon building that is the largest Anglo-Saxon structure found on Scotland. In April and May of this year, AOC Archaeology Group collaborated with the Aberlady Conservation and History Society to investigate some features of Glebe [...]

Sewer workers find Hercules mosaic in Cyprus

Workers digging an extension of a sewer line in Larnaca on the southern coast of Cyprus last month uncovered a large Roman mosaic depicting the Labours of Hercules. Archaeologists took over to excavate the unique work and have thus far unearthed a section 19 meters (62 feet) long by seven meters (23 feet) wide. The [...]

Behind Blood on the Snow

The Summer 2016 issue of Humanities, the magazine of the National Endowment for the Humanities, includes a short article by me about Blood on the Snow, the play that the Bostonian Society commissioned and hosted this spring. As I noted...Show More Summary

When Not to Get Married: Some Late-19th-Century Advice

This fun book, which offered young lovers advice on wise courtship, was one of a series of dime novels printed and sold cheaply in New York City by the J.S. Ogilvie Publishing Company in the late 19 th century. It's recently been digitized...Show More Summary

Mummified macaw head found in Chihuahua cave

The ancient mummified head of a macaw has been found in a cave in a suburb of San Francisco de Borja, Chihuahua northern Mexico. It was discovered by the what was likely a funerary context. Manuel Rodriguez and his son were leveling the floor of a cave on his property when they came across archaeological [...]

Civil War governor’s mansion in Louisiana destroyed in fire

The white frame, pillared house in Opelousas, La., that served as the home and office of Louisiana Gov. Thomas O. Moore for nine months between 1862 and 1863 burned to the ground on July 14. Local officials think it was arson. A nearby museum was also set afire, but there was little damage. Moore and the […]

When Minutemen Marched into Marshfield

So in 1775 there were a hundred British soldiers stationed in Marshfield, mostly on the estate of Nathaniel Ray Thomas. Their commander was Capt. Nisbet Balfour of the 4th Regiment.And on the morning of 20 April, according to Isaac Thomas...Show More Summary

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