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How a Pennsylvania high school got the name Grand Army of the Republic

In the rapidly growing Pennsylvania city of Wilkes-Barre in the 1920s, the school board readily approved construction of a new high school. Then the big question was what to name it. On the board were three sons of Civil War veterans and one of them, John A. Show More Summary

The Last Relics of Crispus Attucks

William Cooper Nell wasn’t the only Boston author researching the Boston Massacre in the nineteenth century. Another was Frederic Kidder, who published his History of the Boston Massacre in 1870. In one footnote he wrote:Crispus Attucks is described as a mulatto; he was born in Framingham near the Chochituate lake and not far from the line of Natick. Show More Summary

Lost Reich Chancellery horses found in warehouse

Two monumental bronze equine sculptures by Josef Thorak that once guarded Hitler’s Reich Chancellery in Berlin have been found in a warehouse in the southwestern German spa town of Bad Durkheim. The raid was one of 10 executed at the same time around the country. Art squad police raided properties in Berlin, Bavaria, North Rhine-Westphalia [...]

Robben Island Prison Museum: Robert Sobukwe House

Gallery of images of Robben Island, World Heritage Site and Apartheid era prison: Robert Sobukwe House. Page 34.

Plaster casts of Vesuvius’ victims restored

When Vesuvius erupted on August 24th, 79 A.D., a column of ash and pumice rained down on Pompeii, depositing as much as a foot per hour in some parts of the city. Fleeing the shower of stone and ash, many people took shelter in buildings, a deadly choice as it happened, since within six hours [...]

More Information about the Attucks Family

In 1860 the historian and activist William C. Nell addressed a crowd at the ninetieth anniversary of the Boston Massacre. That event took place in an auditorium called the Meionaon, part of the Tremont Temple. [Why don’t we have a Meionaon...Show More Summary

Because Nothing Says Memorial Day Like a Confederate Flag Burning

Artist John Sims and Julian Chambliss, chairman of the Department of History and Africa and African-American Studies program at Rollins College in Florida, will spend…

The Brown Family Memories of Crispus Attucks

As I quoted yesterday, in 1857 the descendants of William Brown of Framingham published a claim that he had been the owner of Crispus Attucks, victim of the Boston Massacre.They made that statement in a small book published to celebrate...Show More Summary

Medieval panels looted from Devon church found

Two 15th century painted oak panels ripped out of Holy Trinity Church in Torbryan, Devon, almost two years ago have been recovered by police. A sharp-eyed and damn decent collector spotted them in an online sale and notified the authorities who traced them in a property in south London. The place was raided by detectives [...]

Civil War Memorial Day ceremonies planned in Washington and Petersburg, Va.

President Lincoln’s Cottage at the United States Soldiers’ and Airmen Home  in Washington, D.C., and Pamplin Historical Park  in Petersburg, Va., are each hosting Memorial Day ceremonies May 25.At the Lincoln Cottage, Memorial Day will...Show More Summary

"Caveat Emptor!": The First Anti-Slavery Pamphlet Published in New England

With Slate's Jamelle Bouie, I'm co-hosting a special summer project for Slate Plus: a nine-episode podcast series on the history of American slavery, supplemented by essays, timelines, and book excerpts. The Vault will periodically feature documents that correspond to the topics we address there. Show More Summary

Finishing Up at Polis

I realized today that I have not posted anything in a few days. This is due to a few factors – less than reliable internet at the hotel and long days trying to finish up our work here at Polis. … Continue reading ?

The Crispus Attucks Teapot

Among the artifacts in the “We Are One” exhibit at the Boston Public Library is a teapot linked to Crispus Attucks, now owned by Historic New England. (And shown here thanks to a Harvard course on material culture.)I read about this teapot years ago, but I’d never seen it before. Show More Summary

Bronze Age Egtved Girl was not from Denmark

Egtved Girl, the Bronze Age woman whose exceptionally well-preserved grave was discovered near the village of Egtved on the Jutland peninsula of southeastern Denmark, was not born in Denmark. Researchers from the National Museum of Denmark and the University of Copenhagen studied the remains of her body, clothes and accessories using a combination of biomolecular, [...]

Anglo-Saxon butter churn lid

Saxon artefacts discovered in Stafford during construction of WCML improvement project Archaeologists have discovered an Anglo-Saxon wooden butter churn lid at a rail development near Stafford.  But radiocarbon tests have revealed the lid of the butter churn dates from the early medieval period. The tests have put a fragment of wood found with the lid […]

“We Are One” Exhibits Opens in Boston

Earlier this year I recommended the “God Save the People” exhibit at the Massachusetts Historical Society. This month the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library, just a few blocks away on Boyltston Street, opened a new exhibit called “We Are One.” It’s also very good. Show More Summary

Le Brun’s Jabach Family restored and on display

Charles Le Brun’s monumental portrait Everhard Jabach and His Family purchased last year by the Metropolitan Museum of Art has been restored and is now on display in the museum’s European Paintings Gallery alongside other French works from the 17th century. Feast your eyes upon this pair of very satisfying before and after pictures: The [...]

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