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Did the Julio-Claudians suffer from congenital heart defects?

A history resource article by Mary Harrsch © 2015 Nude statue of Julius Caesar. Photographed at The Musée du Louvre in Paris, France byMary Harrsch © 2008 A recently published article, "Has the diagnosis of a stroke been overlooked in the symptoms of Julius Caesar", by Francesco M. Show More Summary

Replica of LaFayette’s ship Hermione sets sail for US

The Marquis de Lafayette, hero of the American Revolution, was only 19 years old when he defied his family and a direct order of King Louis XVI of France to join the American colonists in their fight for independence from Britain. He outfitted a vessel, La Victoire, with his own money and set sail for [...]

Conserving a boat made of cloves

British Museum organics conservator Verena Kotonski was tasked with a unique assignment last November: conserving a model boat made of cloves. The museum doesn’t know much about the boat’s history. They think it was made in Indonesia anywhere from 18th to the early 20th century, probably in the middle of that range. It entered the [...]

18th c. luxury sex toy found in Gdansk latrine

Archaeologists excavating a latrine in the Podwalu suburb of Gdansk, Poland, discovered a 18th century dildo on Tuesday. The sex toy is eight inches long and made of high quality leather with a carved wooden tip. It is filled with bristles. This would have been a very expensive object, and its long sojourn in the [...]

Take a guided tour of HMS Erebus

Last year Parks Canada released a minute of the video taken by the remote operated vehicle which found the HMS Erebus and a minute of the film taken by divers when they discovered the ship’s bell was included in a brief video about the recovery and analysis of the bell, but other than that, we’ve [...]

New York to put up marker at site of Wall Street slave market

There are 38 historical markers in Lower Manhattan. None of them acknowledge the city’s massive debt to the slaves who literally built it. That will change this year because the city council has approved a marker on the site of New York’s first slave market at the corner of Wall Street and Pearl Street. In [...]

Bronzes stolen from gallery 32 years ago found

Two bronze sculptures that were stolen from the Hirschl & Adler Gallery in New York in December of 1983 have been found and returned to the gallery. Central Figure of Day by Paul Manship was the first to be stolen from the gallery in broad light on December 3rd, 1983. Three weeks later, Figure of [...]

Creeping Baby Doll is back…FOR YOUR SOUL

Inspired by my recent foray into Swiss watchmaker automata, I decided to revisit one of my old favorites from the archives: the creepy Creeping Baby Doll. When I first posted about this monstrous hybrid of human baby and machine four years ago, it was within the context of the National Museum of American History’s extensive [...]

Family looking for broken sewer pipe finds 2,500 years of history

A family in Lecce, an ancient city on the tip of Italy’s boot heel, found a veritable historical complex under their feet when they began digging to find a faulty sewer pipe in 2000. Luciano Faggiano family had acquired the building at Via Ascanio Grandi 56 planning to use the first floor as a trattoria [...]

The glory of 18th century Swiss automata

A collection of 21 museum-quality automata will be sold at Sotheby’s Important Watches auction in New York on June 11th. The exquisite collection was assembled over 50 years and include late-18th and early-19th century Swiss snuffboxes, music boxes, watches and clocks by the premier craftsmen of the era and later owned by some of the [...]

Roman bronze harpy found in England

A team from the Colchester Archaeological Trust unearthed the rare Roman bronze figurine of a harpy in Brightlingsea on the southeastern coast of England. Archaeologist Ben Holloway discovered the petite four-inch high piece in September of last year during the preventative excavation of a section of the Moverons Quarry before gravel quarrying was slated to [...]

Mary Sanderson and the Man in Her Bed

Mary Munroe was born in 1748 in a “part of Lexington called Scotland” for the number of Scottish immigrants who had settled there. She reportedly kept “a little of the Scottish accent…all her life.” In October 1772, Mary Munroe married Samuel Sanderson, a cabinetmaker who had moved into town from Waltham four years before. Show More Summary

Please follow me to my new website.....

Here's a big HELLO to those of you who might find yourself here through a Google search, or you are a long-time subscriber to this site via Feedburner and/or RSS Feed. I've moved! I'd love to have you visit me at my own domain where I come out from behind the ElementaryHistoryTeacher name, but continue to share the stories behind the history. Show More Summary

New to the Civil War Memory Library, 04/21

Terry Alford, Fortune’s Fool: The Life of John Wilkes Booth (Oxford University Press, 2015). Lisa T. Frank, The Civilian War: Confederate Women and Union Soldiers…

The Roman Empire and Dacia

The history of Rome and Dacia is another example of friction at the edge of the Empire causing a confrontation with people who refused to be subjugated. It took the Romans nearly twenty years to defeat Dacia once hostilities broke into the open. Show More Summary

Lists of Types of Mania and Melancholy, Compiled for Early-19th-Century Doctors 

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. These lists of types of mania and melancholy appear in the 1817 handbook The Philadelphia Medical Dictionary (available on the Internet Archive, via the U.S. Show More Summary

Four African Women who are Changing the World...

Ngozi Okonjo-Iweala is one of the most influential economic leaders in the world though her policies have not been universally popular.

“Shot a Canon Ball throug the metin hous”

On 19 Apr 1775, two companies of militiamen marched from Andover. Anticipating that the British column was headed to Concord, where the Massachusetts Provincial Congress had collected supplies, they marched toward that town, but kept adjusting their course as they received more news. Show More Summary

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