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President Washington and Major Gibbs

Here’s a final glimpse for the week of President George Washington’s visit to Massachusetts in 1789. On Friday, 30 October, Washington left Boston for the north shore and New Hampshire. His diary entry for that day was all about the bridges along the way, such as the one over the Charles River, shown above courtesy of the John Carter Brown Library. Show More Summary

If the Virginia Flaggers Show Up in Your Town…

…and no one comes out to greet them, does it really matter? One of the reasons behind Robert E. Lee’s 1862 invasion of the United States was the belief that the state of Maryland was being held against its will. Lee hoped that the presence of his army would be sufficient for closet Confederates to […]

Citizen Kane to be screened at Hearst Castle

There must be some weird spinning noises coming from the Hearst mausoleum at Cypress Lawn Cemetery in Colma, California, because for the first time ever, Citizen Kane, Orson Welles’ greatest masterpiece and William Randolph Heart’s noirest bête noir, will be screened at Hearst Castle. It will be shown in the castle’s private theater on March [...]

It’s like they had a camera in our apartment

We took the kids to see Selma, and I think you should too. (I mean, my God: it’s got both Stephen Root and Wendell Pierce.) Its historical liberties notwithstanding, it’s a great piece of historical fiction. As a sometime practitioner of both history and historical fiction, let me explain why. First, here’s John Steinbeck on […]

“Point of Honor” Buries the Lost Cause For Good

The producers of Amazon’s new series, “Point of Honor,” set out to appeal to mainstream viewers who for whatever reason prefer their dramas to be set in the past. The history itself is almost incidental. “Point of Honor” plays with the time tested popular meme of the family caught in the middle of an unfolding […]

President Washington in Sickness and in Lexington

Having spent many autumn days outdoors meeting lots of American citizens, on 26 Oct 1789 President George Washington…got sick. He wrote in his diary:The day being Rainy & Stormy—myself much disordered by a Cold and inflamation in the left eye, I was prevented from visiting Lexington (where the first blood in the dispute with G. Show More Summary

132-year-old Winchester ’73 found leaning against tree

Eva Jensen, Cultural Resource Program Manager at Great Basin National Park in eastern Nevada’s Snake mountain range, was exploring the park with the archaeology team looking for Native American artifacts on November 6th, 2014, when she spotted an object leaning against a Juniper tree. Upon closer examination, she saw that it was a rifle so [...]

The Daily Beast Shows How Not to Think about the Confederate Flag Controversy

Jonathan Horn’s short article in The Daily Beast is designed to highlight his new biography of Robert E. Lee by wading into to the Confederate flag controversy at Washington & Lee University. While it will likely convince those predisposed politically to agree with his conclusions the historical content falls short. Horn’s basic point is that […]

RepiTitiationes ~ 01/04/15

… a bit of a lacuna due to twitter issues and flu issues … Author Says a Whole Culture—Not a Single 'Homer'—Wrote 'Iliad,' 'Odyssey' http://t.co/uWhla0fhy8 — rogueclassicist (@rogueclassicist) January 4, 2015 Ovid, Heroides 8.105-116...Show More Summary

RepiTitiationes ~ 12/31/14

Did Roman Soldiers Eat Meat? – The Roman Military Diet http://t.co/aRTb7xdhaD — rogueclassicist (@rogueclassicist) December 31, 2014 Turn Me into a Lyre: Three More Songs for Drinking | Sententiae Antiquae http://t.co/e7uD9fbU8c — rogueclassicist...Show More Summary

RepiTitiationes ~ 12/30/14

Classics in Sarasota: Where words work: Anne Carson on Greek http://t.co/yk8nOqm5LO — rogueclassicist (@rogueclassicist) December 30, 2014 Nuntii Latini mensis Decembris 2014 – Latein-Monatsnachrichten – Radio Bremen http://t.co/GsSrfvvJmB...Show More Summary

RepiTitiationes ~ 12/29/14

Still in catchup mode … Beautiful #bilingual Latin & Greek papyrus, 4th c. AD court proceedings, R[espondit] N?? … http://t.co/psTpnxw9YU pic.twitter.com/KK6dKiCsEV — Edward Zarrow (@drzarrow) December 29, 2014 Looking at the AIA Preliminary Program. It would be nice to know how long we have to present our papers or am I missing something? — Louise […]

Schoolboy Views of President Washington in 1789

When President George Washington finally reached Boston on 24 Oct 1789, he found that the town had planned a huge celebration for him. Huge.The young architect Charles Bulfinch had designed a triumphal arch, shown above. (For more about...Show More Summary

Quote du Jour: Werner Herzog on Diodorus Siculus

From an interview in the Telegraph, inter alia: What is he reading? “Ah, some old Greek writer, a historiographer, Diodorus Siculus. I’m only reading him because he has the best details on Alexander the Great’s father, Philip II of Macedon, who was a very, very fascinating person.” He considers a moment, then gives forth a […]

Museum acquires Anglo-Saxon St. Peter carving used as cat grave marker

The Museum of Somerset in Taunton has acquired a medieval carving of Saint Peter that for years was used as a marker for a pet cat’s grave. The 18 by 17-inch stone is carved with the tonsured and clean-shaved saint with his head turned slightly to the right and two fingers of his right hand [...]

Why Charles Dew’s Secessionist Commissioners Matter 150 Years Later

My abbreviated course on the Civil War has hit the ground running in the last two weeks. This time around I am using Louis Masur’s brief history of the war and Reconstruction and so far it is working out well. I tend to look for a concise narrative that I can supplement in various ways. […]

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