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Band of Burglars

On Tuesday, one of the biggest unsolved cases in FBI history burst wide open. In a new book, investigative journalist Betty Medsger revealed the identities of the anti-war activists who broke into the FBI's office in Media, Pa., in March 1971 and made off with the agency's secret files. Show More Summary

‘Honor Restored’ in Lexington, Virginia

No, I am not referring to the dedication of another highway Confederate by the Virginia Flaggers near Lexington later today. Next week Washington & Lee…

The Documents That Trapped Poor Southern Farmers in a Dangerous Form of Debt

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. A commonplace of Southern rural life in the late-19 th and early-20...Show More Summary

Executive Action

One hundred and seventy-nine years ago today, President Andrew Jackson had a close call. The 67-year-old president emerged from a funeral in the House chamber and was set upon by Richard Lawrence, a housepainter who was off that day....Show More Summary

The Info-Dense Maps Civilians Used to Follow WWII From the Home Front

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. These bright Dated Events War Maps, issued in 1942, 1944, and 1945, are by Toronto artist Stanley Turner. Show More Summary

The Unknown Soldiers

In the just-released The Harlem Hellfighters, Max Brooks—who made his name with the The Zombie Survival Guide and World War Z—dives into the story and heroics of the 369 th U.S. Army Infantry Regiment, the all-black unit assembled...Show More Summary

A Victorian Argument That Snow Is Holy, Illustrated by a Beautiful Catalog of Flakes 

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. These plates, cataloging the geometrical forms of snowflakes, are...Show More Summary

The Case of the Closely Watched Courtesans

An hour with a prostitute costs on average $150, though prices can range from as low as $5 for a single sex act to $1,000 an hour, the going rate for “high-end” online escort services in Miami. Many of those in the sex trade were encouraged by family members to take up sex work. Show More Summary

Jefferson’s Outline of the Differences Between Northerners and Southerners 

The Vault is Slate’s history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. In a 1785 letter to the Marquis de Chastellux, a French writerShow More Summary

“A Gun to the Heart of the City”

Excerpted from Tomorrow-Land: The 1964-65 World’s Fair and the Transformation of America by Joseph Tirella, out now from Lyons Press. The 1964 World’s Fair was expected to enrich New York city and state coffers and would surely be the greatest in history, Robert Moses and his public relations staff repeatedly reminded New Yorkers. Show More Summary

The Papers Late-19th-Century Chinese Immigrants Had to Carry To Prove Their Legal Status

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. As of the 1892 passage of the Geary Act, which extended the decade-old...Show More Summary

“I Would Have Followed Them Into Battle”

Kim Hopfer, a mother of two, lives on a farm in Gettysburg, Pennsylvania. She works as a truck driver, and each year spends her one week of vacation re-enacting the Civil War—not in a hoop skirt and bonnet, knitting socks, but in a pair of Union blue trousers, among the ranks of the 138 th Pennsylvania. Show More Summary

The Slips of Paper That Called 19th-Century Militias to Muster 

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. These muster notices were sent to eligible citizens in New England towns, calling them to come parade with their militia on an appointed day. Show More Summary

Report From the Field: Interpreting Civil War Battlefields

Last night I returned from five days of battlefield stomping with thirteen wonderful students. I was hoping to write a few more blog posts, but…

Sergeant Stubby

1. A Dog Has His Day On July 6, 1921, a curious gathering took place at the State, War, and Navy Building on Pennsylvania Avenue in Washington. The occasion was a ceremony honoring veterans of the 102 nd Infantry of the American Expeditionary Forces’ 26 th “Yankee” Division, who had seen action in France during the Great War. Show More Summary

Late 19th-Century Maps Show Measles Mortality Before Vaccines

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. These maps of measles mortality appeared in three late-19 th -century statistical atlases published by the Census Office. Show More Summary

Forgetting Odessa

“People are worried now more than ever. You hear shooting in the streets, and barricades are going up. … The police are doing nothing or even going over to the side of the thugs.” That was what Lyubov Girs, the wife of a Russian official, jotted down in her diary. Show More Summary

Hartley and Franklin, Reunited in Paris

I’ve been writing about the on-again, off-again correspondence of Benjamin Franklin and David Hartley, British scientist and Member of Parliament. Their relationship actually turned out to be a factor in the end of the war.After London received news of the Battle of Yorktown, Lord North’s government fell. Show More Summary

An Anti-Suffrage Children’s Book From 1910, Mocking “Baby” Activists

The Vault is Slate's history blog. Like us on Facebook, follow us on Twitter @slatevault, and find us on Tumblr. Find out more about what this space is all about here. Anti-suffrage literature printed in the 1910s, as suffrage activists in the United States ramped up their campaign for enfranchisement, took a number of clever forms. Show More Summary

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