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Ancient textiles found in Nepal suggest Silk Road ran further south

Analysis of rare ancient textiles discovered in a tomb in Nepal suggest the Silk Road network may have extended further south than previously believed. The textile fragments were found in the Samdzong 5, one in a complex of 10 shaft tombs dug into a cliff face in Upper Mustang, Nepal, between 400 and 650 A.D. [...]

Swans in Fog

At Lake Swartswood, New Jersey.

Key Moments in the History of Liberia

A brief, pictorial history of Liberia, the only African country to have been founded by African-American colonists.

A New Clue to Caesar Marion

Back in 2006, I wrote about a black man named Caesar Marion who protested a town meeting measure in August 1775, during the siege of Boston. The Essex Gazette referred to him as “the well-known Caesar Merriam.”I’d found the name of Caesar Marion on the 1771 provincial tax list, indicating that he owned property. Show More Summary

“The Road From Appomattox” Symposium

All five presentations from this year’s Civil War symposium held recently at the Library of Virginia are now available for viewing via C-SPAN. The event was titled, “The Road from Appomattox: Political Violence, Military Conflict, and National Reunion”. They are all worth watching. Edward L. Ayers, “Reckoning with Reconstruction and […]

Space archaeologist finds potential Viking site in Canada

A test excavation in the peninsula of Point Rosee in southwestern Newfoundland, Canada, has unearthed evidence of a Viking settlement. If the site is confirmed as Norse, it will be the second of its kind and history books will have to be rewritten because Point Rosee is significantly more to the west than the Vikings [...]

This is not an April Fool’s post

Seriously. I don’t really do April Fool’s because I can never come up with anything clever. Last year my not even remotely fooling post was dismissed as a joke by one commenter because of the date, but the story was actually released a few days earlier and I just hadn’t gotten to it yet. So [...]

The End of the Washington Elm

This photograph comes from the Leslie Jones Collection at the Boston Public Library, via Digital Commonwealth.The webpage dates the image as “ca. 1917–1934,” but we can be more specific. In his essay “The Washington Elm Tradition” Samuel F. Show More Summary

A Seventies Board Game Designed to Teach Players About Race, Housing, and Privilege

In May 2012, science-fiction writer and blogger John Scalzi published a post titled "Straight White Male: The Lowest Difficulty Setting There Is." "I've been thinking of a way to explain to straight white men how life works for them,...Show More Summary

Sparta's Navy

Modern Replica of a Trireme; part of the Hellenic Navy No, this isn't an April Fools Joke. Sparta did have a navy. In fact, Sparta was a significant naval power in Ar chaic times. Indeed, although the Peloponnesian War is often seenShow More Summary

Roman mosaic bonanza at the Getty

The Getty Museum in Los Angeles has an exceptional collection of Roman floor mosaics from the Imperial era. Some of them have been on display consistently, but others will be seen by the public for the first time in Roman Mosaics Across the Empire, a new exhibition that opened on Wednesday at the Getty Villa. [...]

A New Look at Saratoga

At the American Revolution Conference two weeks ago I met Larry Arnold, an expert guide to the Saratoga battlefield.During a drive to the Green Spring battle site, Larry told us about a recent discovery he’d made on eBay. He saw a letter that mentioned Saratoga offered with a scan big enough to actually read. Show More Summary

The Art of the New Deal

Membership in a political party that had prevailed in only two presidential races out of the last nine and was divided on matters both trivial and ideologically significant. Party rules that required a large majority of delegates to gain nomination. Show More Summary

New Book Project for Public Historians

I don’t believe I have said much of anything about it on this site, but in addition to my book project on the myth of the Black Confederate soldier I have also been working on a proposal for a collection of essays on interpreting the Civil War at museums and […]

Export bar placed on Robert the Bruce seal matrix

A unique double seal matrix commissioned by Robert the Bruce that is one of very few surviving objects linked directly to King Robert I has been sold to an overseas buyer and is in danger of leaving the UK. The seal sold at auction on December 4th, 2015, for £151,250 ($217,450), well above the pre-sale [...]

Omohundro Institute Conference in Worcester, 23-26 June

On the same weekend as the Dublin Seminar, the Omohundro Institute for Early American History and Culture will hold its 22nd Annual Conference in Worcester. This year’s conference themes are “Native American Transformations” and “Early...Show More Summary

Inscribed Etruscan stele found in Tuscany

Archaeologists and students with the Mugello Valley Archaeological Project excavating the ancient Etruscan settlement of Poggio Colla about twenty miles northeast of Florence have discovered an ancient stele with a long inscription in Etruscan. Just days before the end of the dig, the team found an oddly shaped sandstone slab embedded in the foundations of [...]

Down to the Sea in Deerfield with the Dublin Seminar, 24-26 June

On the weekend of 24-26 June, Historic Deerfield will host the annual Dublin Seminar for New England Folklife, this year’s topic being “New England at Sea: Maritime Memory and Material Culture”: Focusing on how the region remembered its maritime past, the weekend begins with a keynote address by the historian W. Show More Summary

If Donald Trump Had Delivered the Gettysburg Address

This little gem comes to us from The Angry Staff Officer blog. It was re-posted on George Takei’s Facebook page. All I can say is enjoy. It was a long time ago – I don’t think anyone can even remember, but I can remember, I have a great memory, I’ve […]

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