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“Law and (Dis)Order in Boston, 1773” at Old South in December

In historical Boston, December is Tea Party time, and the Old South Meeting House and Boston Tea Party Ships & Museum are collaborating on a series of public presentations.Friday, 5 December, 10:00 A.M. to 4:00 P.M.Holiday Open House...Show More Summary

A Few Thoughts About Lesley Gordon’s 16th Connecticut

We’ve been waiting for this book for some time. I remember talking to Lesley Gordon about regimental histories eight years ago following a panel discussion I took part in at the AHA in Philadelphia. Well, her new book, A Broken Regiment: The 16th Connecticut’s Civil War, arrived on Tuesday and I am just about finished […]

A Very Short History of Cape Verde

A potted history of the island archipelago of Cape Verde.

A Punch Bowl in Pennsylvania

Last month the Museum of the American Revolution being built in Philadelphia shared news about archeology on its site, including the shards of a ceramic punchbowl shown here. The museum’s blog reported:In all, we excavated a well and twelve brick-lined privies, most of them brimming with artifacts. Show More Summary

23,000-year-old limestone Venus found in France

Archaeologists excavating the Renancourt neighborhood of Amiens in northern France have unearthed a small artifact of large historical significance. It’s a limestone statuette of a female figure with exaggerated breasts and buttocks of a type known as a Paleolithic Venus. She’s 23,000 years old, an artifact of the late Gravettian culture found in France and [...]

Shenandoah group’s annual meeting offers museum tour, speakers

The Shenandoah Valley Battlefields Foundation will offer more than the usual business report when it meets at 4 p.m. Tuesday at Winchester’s Museum of the Shenandoah Valley. Billed as the climatic event of a year-long series of programs...Show More Summary

A New Song: “The British Steel”

Earlier this year Michael Laird Rare Books of Texas offered for sale a rare chapbook printed in Newcastle, England, titled A Garland, Containing Four New Songs. One of those songs, “The British Steel,” is still new to the standard databases, as is the little book itself. Show More Summary

New To the Civil War Memory Library, 11/28

In the interest of full disclosure as we enter the Holiday Season, all book links on this site are to my Amazon affiliate account. I get a small cut in the form of a book credit from each purchase. Happy shopping. Sven Beckert, Empire of Cotton: A Global History (Knopf, 2014). John Demos, The Heathen […]

Flint axe with wood handle found at Lolland dig

The tally of marvels unearthed at the Fehmarn Belt Link tunnel construction site on the Danish island of Lolland seems to get longer every weeks. We can now add a flint axe with an intact wooden handle to the flint dagger with the intact bark handle and the 5,000-year-old human footprints around the hazel stick [...]

Stonewall Jackson’s sister-in-law on… Thanksgiving.

For a number of years I’ve posted different perspectives on Thanksgiving (here, here, and here, for example), and usually related to “Southern memory”. Ultimately, there seems to be a tug of war between traditional and historic firsts. Yet, while there are those who stand resistant to the tradition inspired by Massachusetts Bay’s Puritans, perhaps they shouldn’t […]

Taking Liberties

The History Channel released this photo to promote its upcoming series Sons of Liberty. According to the caption on its website, it shows: Dr. Joseph Warren [hmmm] Paul Revere [okay] Samuel Adams [snort!] John Hancock [come on] JohnShow More Summary

Happy Thanksgiving

Abraham Lincoln’s 1863 Thanksgiving proclamation seems to me to be very appropriate this week. I do therefore invite my fellow citizens in every part of the United States, and also those who are at sea and those who are sojourning in foreign lands, to set apart and observe the last Thursday of November next, as […]

Rare Shakespeare first folio found in French library

One of only 233 known copies of the First Folio edition of Shakespeare’s plays has been discovered in the library of Saint-Omer, a small town in northern France 30 miles south of Calais. Rémy Cordonnier, director of the medieval and early modern collection, found it this September when looking through the library’s stack for materials [...]

The Great Harbor at Carthage

What is a Cothon? A cothon is a man-made harbor originated by the ancient Phoenicians. Technically, a cothon is a man-made island at the center of a harbor, but because this island was typically included in the harbor design, its name eventually became the general term for the type of harbor. Show More Summary

Still Fighting Reconstruction

I think there are a number of problems with Rev. Barber’s interpretation of Reconstruction, but I can’t help but acknowledge the ways in which the post-Civil War period seems to be creeping into our discourse about a host of issues related to racial politics in recent years. The sesquicentennial of Reconstruction Era offers a number […]

Street View and the 1700s

Back in February the Guardian newspaper featured artist Halley Docherty’s images of historic paintings of London laid over (and, thanks to Photoshop, somewhat under) Google Street View photographs of the modern city. Above, for example, is Canaletto’s 1750s view of the Royal Hospital at Greenwich, one of my favorite parts of London. Show More Summary

Hoard of Roman silver found in The Hague

Archaeologists excavating the future site of the Rotterdamsebaan access road in The Hague announced on Friday that they’ve unearthed a Roman-era pot containing a hoard of coins and jewelry. The contents of the pot were discovered fused together in a large lump of metal. Conservators were able to separate the individual parts of the mass [...]

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