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“Celebrating Birth Nights, not of a President, but a Private citizen?”

When we left President John Adams in 1797, he had privately expressed disapproval of the balls that Philadelphians had regularly held on George Washington’s birthday.“In Countries where Birth is respected and where Authority goes with...Show More Summary

Shenandoah Valley men on the Mexican border

This is outside my normal “field of operations”, but… putting my stories of the antebellum Shenandoah, and news reports of those buried alive in the same period, on the side for today… I want to share a reminder that we’re just about to enter the WWI Centennial (the US version… Europe has been at it a while, already). Of […]

Teaching the Civil War in4

I really love the Civil War Trust’s in4 video series. They offer concise overviews of a wide range of topics and they are perfect for the classroom. Back in 2014…

Call for Papers on “The Adams Family and the American Revolution”

The Sons of the American Revolution has announced that its 2017 Annual Conference on the American Revolution will take place in Quincy. In honor of the 250th anniversary of the birth of John Quincy Adams, the theme will be “The Adams Family and the American Revolution.” The gathering will also honor Lyman H. Show More Summary

Lee’s Headquarters: Civil War Trust Restoration Part 2

This map shows the location of the 1863 structures at the Thompson property, acquired and[...] The post Lee’s Headquarters: Civil War Trust Restoration Part 2 appeared first on Gettysburg Daily.

Susanna Rowson’s Birthday Song for Washington

February 1798 was the U.S. of A.’s first February for eight years without George Washington as head of state. As described in recent postings, his birthday the previous year, coming near the end of his second term as President, served as a national send-off. Show More Summary

“Yasser Boss”: Old Jeff Mabry Attends a Reunion

Here is some incredible footage of a Confederate veterans reunion in Jacksonville, Florida in May 1914. Like most other reunions it included former camp servants or camp slaves. They were…

President Adams’s Birthday Celebrated—in Lisbon

Though there was no public observation of President John Adams’s birthday in Philadelphia in 1797, one branch of the small U.S. government definitely celebrated it. William Loughton Smith was a fervent Federalist from Charleston, South Carolina. Show More Summary

Ribbon-cutting for Lee’s Gettysburg headquarters is set for Oct. 28

On Friday in Gettysburg, a brightly colored ribbon will be cut, signifying the completion of the Civil War Trust’s $6 million project to purchase four acres of the battlefield and restore a house located there that had been Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee’s headquarters during the historic battle. This deal was a particularly expensive one […]

Celebrating the President’s Birthday One Last Time

On 22 Feb 1797, Philadelphia celebrated George Washington’s last birthday as President. He had declined to serve another term in the office. After the U.S. of A.’s first partisan election, Vice President John Adams had been elected in his place. Show More Summary

Two Nat Turner Tours

I haven’t had much to say concerning the new movie about Nat Turner called Birth of a Nation. To be completely honest, I almost fell asleep when I saw it…

Paddy Power Pays Out on the Presidency

“Paddy Power is paying out to customers who backed Hillary Clinton,” I read. Reminds me of another story about election day bets that make punters sweat. Early in the evening of November 8, 1932—election day, that year—Sam Lamport was running around Democratic National Committee headquarters in mid-Manhattan (just by Grand Central Terminal) trying to find […]

Abigail Adams at a Birthday Ball in Boston

In February 1797, the U.S. of A. made plans to celebrate George Washington’s last birthday as President. Some parts of the country were also eager to celebrate the new President who would take office in March, John Adams.On 17 February,...Show More Summary

A new “area” Civil War blog

It’s been a long time since I’ve acknowledged a new Civil War blog on the scene, but, in that this new one also focuses on a portion of the area which holds my interest… it merits a shout-out. So, for those who are interested in western Maryland… and that general area, thereabouts, in the Civil […]

“The Birth Day has been celebrated very sufficiently”

Boston 1775 has already explored the early American celebrations of George Washington’s birthday: when the first public ceremonies were reported, what date people chose to celebrate given the shift from Julian to Gregorian calendar since Washington’s birth, and what such celebrations meant for masculinity in Virginia. Show More Summary

Footage of the Civil War Centennial

Some incredible footage of the Civil War Centennial was recently uploaded to YouTube. Featured here is a brief speech by Washington and Lee University President Emeritus Dr. Francis Gaines in…

John Adams Contemplates His Birthday

John Adams was born in Braintree on 19 Oct 1735, Old Style, which was 30 October, New Style. That shift was the result of the British Empire’s belated adoption of the Gregorian calendar.Adams adopted the new date, but he remembered the...Show More Summary

Lee’s Headquarters: Civil War Trust Restoration Part 1

On October 28th, the Civil War Trust will cut the ribbon on the widow Mary[...] The post Lee’s Headquarters: Civil War Trust Restoration Part 1 appeared first on Gettysburg Daily.

Looking at Brooklyn Then and Now

While speaking in Morristown last week, I had the pleasure of meeting Jason R. Wickersty, a National Park Service ranger.He just wrote an article about the Battle of Brooklyn for the latest issue of Hallowed Ground, the magazine of the...Show More Summary

Dedication of Dr. Joseph Warren Graveside Statue, 22 Oct.

On Saturday, 22 October, a local group of Freemasons will host a ceremony to dedicate a new statue of Dr. Joseph Warren at his latest gravesite in Forest Hills Cemetery.Those Freemasons, working with Warren descendants and the cemetery, commissioned the statue from Robert Shure of Skylight Studios in Woburn. Show More Summary

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