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Mein Words about John Hancock

Loyalist John Mein wrote one of his “Sagittarius” essays in response to John Hancock’s 1774 oration on the anniversary of the Boston Massacre.As I related yesterday, Hancock had seized Mein’s property in Boston on behalf of London creditors. Show More Summary

Burn Update: Pardee Field and Little Round Top

If all goes as planned, the vegetation around the Pardee Rock will be burned away[...] The post Burn Update: Pardee Field and Little Round Top appeared first on Gettysburg Daily.

I think @dandrezner was right to be “fking embarrassed” by Sessions’s prepared remarks about immigrants

Yesterday Dan Drezner said it was embarrassing that US Attorney General Jeff Sessions called illegal aliens “filth.” Today Drezner apologized, because while the word “filth” was in prepared remarks, Sessions didn’t say it, and because even in the prepared remarks, “The context is clear: Sessions was going to use ‘filth’ to describe MS-13 and drug […]

Stonewall Jackson had a soft side: He loved to garden

Gen. Thomas “Stonewall” Jackson is usually remembered as the stern, no-nonsense soldier who became famous for his Valley Campaign in the Civil War, but it turns out this tough guy had a soft side: He loved to garden.

And the UVA Job in Civil War History Goes To…

A number of my Civil War historians friends have been commenting over on Facebook about the job announcement to replace University of Virginia Professor Gary Gallagher, who is set to […]

The Secret of Sagittarius’s Letters

Boston’s Whigs drove the printer John Mein out of town in 1770. A bunch of merchants confronted him and his partner, John Fleeming, on the street at the end of October 1769.The printers pulled out pistols to defend themselves, and one went off harmlessly. Show More Summary

Top 10 Gettysburg Photo and Drawing Mysteries: #5 through #1

Licensed Battlefield Guides Tim Smith and Garry Adelman bring you #5 through #1 in Garry’s[...] The post Top 10 Gettysburg Photo and Drawing Mysteries: #5 through #1 appeared first on Gettysburg Daily.

A Book Dedication That is ‘Altogether Fitting and Proper’

My collection of essays, Interpreting the American Civil War at Museums and Historic Sites, took a big step closer to publication yesterday with the return of the independent review. I […]

“Sent you one of phillis whetleys books”

Yesterday I quoted from a letter that Deborah Cushing sent her husband Thomas in September 1774 when he was serving in the First Continental Congress.When that letter is cited today, it’s usually because Cushing mentioned the poet Phillis Wheatley. Show More Summary

Little Round Top Controlled Burn

“Wow. Great Burn. This did exactly what it needed to for these guys today.” A[...] The post Little Round Top Controlled Burn appeared first on Gettysburg Daily.

“The peopel hear gott 2 of mr Paddocks cannon one night”

Here’s another report of the removal of cannon from Charlestown and Boston in September 1774 which I came across only last week. It’s a letter from Deborah Cushing to her husband Thomas Cushing (shown here), speaker of the Massachusetts House. Show More Summary

Controlled Burn! But First, Turtles.

The Eastern Box Turtle is a subspecies of the common box turtle. As you could[...] The post Controlled Burn! But First, Turtles. appeared first on Gettysburg Daily.

The Future of Black Confederates in 1860

One of the texts that I recently finished reading is Edmund Ruffin’s Anticipations of the Future To Serve As Lessons For the Present Time (1860). Most of you know Ruffin […]

Gen. Gage’s “disappointment at Charlestown”

Yesterday I quoted merchant John Andrews’s description of the removal of cannon from Charlestown’s shore battery on 7 Sept 1774. As Andrews wrote in a letter dated 12 September, Gen. Thomas Gage didn’t just shrug off the disappearance...Show More Summary

26th North Carolina Part 3: LBG Eric Lindblade

Licensed Battlefield Guide Eric Lindblade showed us the ground the 26th North Carolina would have[...] The post 26th North Carolina Part 3: LBG Eric Lindblade appeared first on Gettysburg Daily.

“The Road to Concord” Starts in Charlestown, 11 Apr.

The Road to Concord tracks four brass cannon stolen out of two Boston armories in mid-September 1774 because those appear to have been Gen. Thomas Gage’s top targets in early 1775.But the first Massachusetts Patriots to surreptitiously remove cannon from under the redcoats’ noses were the people of Charlestown on 7 September. Show More Summary

Cannon Chewing and Plaque Painting on West Confederate Avenue

Over a dozen Confederate artillery plaques were returned to the field this past week after[...] The post Cannon Chewing and Plaque Painting on West Confederate Avenue appeared first on Gettysburg Daily.

Cannon Moved from Salem to Concord

In early March 1775, soon after “Leslie’s Retreat” in Salem, Gen. Thomas Gage started to receive solid information about the Massachusetts Provincial Congress’s effort to build a military force out in rural Massachusetts. An anonymous informant who sometimes wrote in French for added security sent Gage multiple messages on 8 and 9 March. Show More Summary

Lee’s Gettysburg headquarters: Open house dates announced

The Civil War Trust will open Gen. Robert E. Lee’s Gettysburg headquarters on six days this year, all connected to anniversary dates or special programs. The Lee headquarters, once part of a sprawling motel complex, was purchased and restored by the Trust last year for about $6 million. The restoration of an apple orchard at […]

The 16th Michigan Part 2: LBG Stuart Dempsey

Licensed Battlefield Guide Stuart Dempsey is standing next to Vincent’s Brigade marker on Little Round[...] The post The 16th Michigan Part 2: LBG Stuart Dempsey appeared first on Gettysburg Daily.

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