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Wright on “Pedagogues and Protesters” in Boston, 20 June

On Tuesday, 20 June, Conrad E. Wright will speak at the Massachusetts Historical Society in Boston about the confrontation at the heart of his new book, Pedagogues and Protesters: The Harvard College Student Diary of Stephen Peabody, 1767-1768. Show More Summary

“Henry Knox’s First Mission” in Framingham, 20 June

On Tuesday, 20 June, I’ll speak at the Framingham History Center’s annual meeting, debuting a new talk on “Myths and Realities of Col. Henry Knox’s First Mission.”As recounted in almost every history of the Revolutionary War, in theShow More Summary

Thank You, Georgia Historical Society

Earlier this week I traveled to Savannah to take part in the Georgia Historical Society’s NEH Summer Institute, Recognizing an Imperfect Past: History, Memory, and the American Public. This was […]

Mildred G. Burrage’s ”Attack on Bunker Hill“

This map of the Charlestown peninsula in 1775 and the Battle of Bunker Hill comes from the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library, courtesy of the Digital Commonwealth. It is made of “Painted gesso plaster, with land features shown in relief.”The creator was Mildred G. Show More Summary

Secrets of Gen. Clinton’s Map of Bunker Hill

Here’s an intriguing document from the maps collection at the Library of Congress.It’s Gen. Henry Clinton’s hand-drawn map of the Battle of Bunker Hill.One eye-catching detail is that Clinton sketched a small fortification on top of Bunker’s Hill, at the left of this image. Show More Summary

A New Face of the Forty-Eighth: Private James Dempsey, Co. F, 48th PA Infantry

It doesn't happen as often as one might think, considering all the many thousands of Civil War photographs that were taken, but I always, always enjoy seeing a "new" face of the Forty-Eighth, a photograph of a soldier I have never seen before. Show More Summary

EXTRA: Celebrating “Grand Union Flag” Day in Somerville

Somerville usually celebrates the flag-raising on Prospect Hill on the anniversary of that event. Unfortunately, that’s on 1 January—not always the most comfortable time to be outside on a New England hilltop. So this year the city is celebrating that event on the Saturday after Flag Day, or 17 June. Show More Summary

A Coffin at Bunker Hill

Nathaniel Coffin (1725-80) was a merchant in Boston who in November 1768 took the job of Deputy Cashier to the American Board of Customs.That shifted Coffin politically onto the side of the royal government. He would even report to his...Show More Summary

Looking at Ben’s Revolution

This spring brought us a new book from Nathaniel Philbrick, author of Bunker Hill and Valiant Ambition, and Wendell Minor, jacket designer for John Adams and 1776. Unlike those books, Ben’s Revolution is written for young readers. In its format, Ben’s Revolution is a rarity among recent children’s books, almost a unicorn. Show More Summary

Remembering Moses Parker

As described yesterday, Lt. Col. Moses Parker of Chelmsford died as a prisoner of war on 4 July 1775 from a leg wound he suffered in the Battle of Bunker Hill.On 21 July the New-England Chronicle published an unusually long death notice, showing how much esteem people had for Parker. Show More Summary

Corey Stewart Will Make Virginia Confederate Again

Virginia Republican candidate for governor, Corey Stewart, has done us a great service by not only publicly supporting a ban on the removal of Confederate monuments, but in his praise […]

Moses Parker and His Comrades in the Redoubt

As I said yesterday, Col. Ebenezer Bridge’s regiment was one of the New England units ordered onto the Charlestown peninsula on the night of 16 June 1775. Maj. John Brooks and three companies stayed behind at first for other duties, but Bridge, Lt. Show More Summary

Moses Parker, “the most prominent military character”

Moses Parker was born on 13 May 1731 in Chelmsford. Seven years earlier, his father Joseph had served as a “Lieutenant of a company of snowshoe-men” in what would be called Dummer’s War. Once back home, Joseph Parker served on committees and boards for both his meetinghouse and his town.In 1738, when Moses was seven years old, Joseph Parker died. Show More Summary

Two Unconquered Canadiens

This title on the short list for the Wilson Institute for Canadian History’s book prize caught my eye:Joseph Gagné’s Inconquis: Deux retraites françaises vers la Louisiane après 1760 tells the captivating story of two Frehttp://boston1775.blogspot.com/search/label/Frenchnch...Show More Summary

Boston’s Confederate Monument Controversy

I guess we can add my home town of Boston to the list of cities facing questions about what to do with their Confederate monuments. A recent segment on Greater […]

More Colonial Newspaper Advertising Rates

After my posting on colonial newspaper advertising rates, Caitlin G. DeAngelis alerted me to some additional data inside Charles E. Clark’s The Public Prints: The Newspaper in Anglo-American Culture, 1665-1740. Then I found more examples quoted in Arthur M. Show More Summary

Boston Discovers Its Confederate Heritage

Last week I was interviewed by WGBH’s Adam Reilly for a segment that aired this evening on Greater Boston about the Confederate marker on Georges Island in Boston Harbor. Historian […]

James Otis, Jr., and Slavery Revisited

Back in 2006, this blog’s first year, I wrote a couple of essays describing James Otis, Jr., as a slaveholder.For those postings I relied on and quoted a passage from John J. Waters’s The Otis Family in Provincial and Revolutionary Massachusetts (1968): Inconsistencies certainly marked most of James’s actions. Show More Summary

Next Up, St. Louis’s Confederate Monument

Recent high profile debates about the removal of Confederate monuments have centered on important military and political leaders such as Robert E. Lee and Jefferson Davis. Monuments to both men […]

Wheels and What They’re Worth

Elisabeth Meier of the Winterthur Program in American Material Culture just wrote on learning about the art and mystery of the wheelwright at Colonial Williamsburg:I’d already been passed by several carriages in Williamsburg, and each...Show More Summary

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