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Gordon Wood, the Politics of History and the History Classroom

Today during our weekly history department meeting we considered a questionnaire submitted by one of our students inquiring into our political beliefs and how our…

The Oklahoma Checklist of U.S. History Documents

Yesterday I described how the Oklahoma legislature was considering a bill to replace the Advanced Placement U.S. History framework with legal requirements more to its members’ liking (P.D.F. download). Here are the specifics of thatShow More Summary

The Ongoing Battle over Advanced Placement U.S. History

To continue this series of postings on controversial intersections of early American history and current American politics, here’s an update on the conservative attack on the new Advanced Placement U.S. History (“APUSH”) framework.As I noted last fall, the school board in Jefferson County, Colorado, voted to create a special committee to review U.S. Show More Summary

The 48th/150th: The Regiment's New Commander, Colonel George Washington Gowen

150 years ago...the soldiers of the 48th Pennsylvania continued to wait out the winter while in their trenches and bombproofs outside of Petersburg, spending their time and passing the monotonous days of winter as best they could while...Show More Summary

Gary Gallagher Says Farewell to the Civil War America Series

This past week I received a number of advanced copies from the University of North Carolina Press. It’s the first batch of books, where I’ve…

‘From the Birthplace of Secession to the Graveyard of Slavery’

One hundred and fifty years ago today the 55th Massachusetts Volunteer Infantry entered Charleston, South Carolina. Blain Roberts and Ethan Kytle offer a vivid description…

Gordon Wood’s Lawn

It’s been two years since in my posting on “The Search for a Usable Gordon Wood”, and the man maintains the ability to provoke lots of younger historians with his writing.This week Wood published a review in The Weekly Standard of Bernard Bailyn’s latest collection of essays, Sometimes an Art. Show More Summary

A life well lived!

Nothing brings me more joy than Edgar Allan Poe’s obituary.

The Arizona Citizenship Test

Last month the Arizona legislature voted to require high-school students in the state to pass a civics test before graduating—its questions taken from the citizenship test given to immigrants hoping to become citizens. As Valerie Strauss...Show More Summary

Virginia Flaggers Surrender Charlottesville

It was so predictable. Even the anticipation of a city council vote on March 2 regarding whether to continue to recognize Lee-Jackson Day has the…

The bug.

I don’t know enough to know for sure, but this looks like potentially big news. Relatedly, I don’t remember where I was when the Challenger blew up, but I do have a flashbulb memory from when I learned that Magic Johnson had HIV.

4th Conference on the American Revolution, 20-22 Mar.

On 20-22 March, America’s History, L.L.C., will host its fourth annual Conference on the American Revolution in Williamsburg, Virginia.Scheduled speakers include: Edward G. Lengel, Head of Faculty: “Enigmatic Warrior: Light-Horse Harry...Show More Summary

New to the Civil War Memory Library, 02/19

Thomas J. Brown, Civil War Canon: Sites of Confederate Memory in South Carolina, (University of North Carolina Press, 2015). James Conroy, Our One Common Country:…

Gordon Wood v. Gordon Wood

Possibly the right response to Gordon Wood’s “History in Context” in The Weekly Standard – a “get off my lawn essay,” as one historian says – is parody. After all Wood does begin the essay by saying his mentor Bernard Bailyn is woefully under-appreciated, and then proceeds to mention that Bailyn has two Pulitzers.1 What […]

An American Artist in London

Yesterday I quoted a Boston News-Letter advertisement about a black man making portraits in Boston in 1773. I also noted how Prince Demah (Barnes) painted William Duguid in February 1773, according to a note on the back of that portrait,...Show More Summary

The Fate of Lee-Jackson Day in Charlottesville

I think it is safe to say that later this evening the Charlottesville (Va) city council will vote to end the practice of recognizing Lee-Jackson…

“Poignant and heartbreaking.”

No, not my lovemaking, Battle Lines. Or so says Publishers Weekly. The full review, if you want to read it but fear of links, is below the fold. In 15 harrowing chapters, Fetter-Vorm (Trinity) and Ari Kelman’s (A Misplaced Massacre) graphic take on the Civil War brings home the shattering costs of America’s epochal conflict […]

Henry Louis Gates, Black Confederates and White Liberal Academics

Last Saturday Megan Kate Nelson, my wife and I went to see Suzan Lori Parks’s three-act play, “Father Comes Home From the Wars.” I don’t…

The Mysteries of Scipio Moorhead

On 7 Jan 1773 and nine more times that year, the Boston News-Letter ran this advertisement:At Mr. M‘Lean’s, Watch-Maker, near the Town-House, is a Negro Man whose extraordinary Genius has been assisted by one of the best Masters in London; he takes Faces at the lowest Rates. Show More Summary

Lt. Williams: “I am sorry to say I am Commanded by Mrs. Moodie”

Lt. Henry A. Williams didn’t just complain about the 2nd Artillery Regiment and Capt.-Lt. Jacob Kemper, as detailed yesterday. As Holly A. Mayer quotes him in Belonging to the Army: Camp Followers and Community During the American Revolution, Williams also had things to say about his own captain, Andrew Moodie, and the captain’s wife. Show More Summary

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