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History of the Civil War 1861-1865

by James F. RhodesFrom the publisher:This landmark study of the most traumatic era in American history won a Pulitzer Prize in 1918 for its concise, clear-minded survey of the Civil War from political and economic perspectives. FromShow More Summary

The 111th New York Volunteer Infantry: A Civil War History

by Martin W. HuskFrom the publisher:This regimental history follows the 111th New York Volunteer Infantry's service from muster through victory, with many first-hand accounts and primary sources. It provides details on the towns from which the regiment was organized and examines the men who served in its ranks. Show More Summary

Washington’s “Early notice” to Ward

On 2 Mar 1776, Gen. George Washington wrote a short note from Cambridge to his second-in-command, Gen. Artemas Ward:After weighing all Circumstances of Tide, &c., and considering the hazard of having the Posts on Dorchester Neck taken...Show More Summary

Panel on Environmental History and Early America in Boston, 6 Mar.

In Tuesday, 6 March, the Massachusetts Historical Society will host a panel discussion on the topic “Common Spaces: Environmental History and the Study of Early America.” This session is a crossover event for two of the society’s seminar...Show More Summary

“Dangerous to delay taking Post on Dorchester Hills”

On 3 Mar 1776, Gen. George Washington followed up his short note to Gen. Artemas Ward (quoted yesterday) with a full set of orders for moving onto the Dorchester peninsula on the evening of the 4th.My Letter of last Night would inform...Show More Summary

“Free America” at Last

In 1842, William McCarty published a collection titled Songs, Odes, and Other Poems, on National Subjects in Philadelphia. He told readers he had scoured newspapers “from the period of Braddock’s defeat to the death of President Harrison.”The...Show More Summary

South Cumberland Elementary School Remembers the Confederacy With a Lynching

Update: Thanks to Dan Weinfeld for sending along this link, which identifies Crossville, Tennesse as a possible Sundown Town. This certainly adds some important historical context to this particular discussion. It would be easy to conclude that the backlash against Confederate monuments and the battle flag has died down since this past summer. You would […]

Willie Hudspeth’s Confederate Monument

Earlier this month Denton county (Texas) commissioners accepted recommendations to alter a Confederate monument located on the grounds of the local courthouse. The decision follows roughly twenty years of protest by local activist Willie Hudspeth. ? This short video produced by Vice follows Hudspeth’s efforts to remove the monument. It’s well done and does a […]

“Composed, it is supposed, by General WARREN”

Yesterday I quoted a letter reportedly sent to the Virginia Argus in Richmond on 6 Nov 1804, referring to a “most excellent SONG composed, it is supposed, by General WARREN, who fell at the battle of Bunker’s Hill, in the year 1775.”The...Show More Summary

Catherine Templeton’s Civil War Memory on the Campaign Trail

This might be the clearest example of the distinction between history and memory that I have ever come across. It’s not unusual to employ memory of the Civil War to run for and maintain office in South Carolina. Not too long ago two Republican state legislators proposed erecting a monument to the state’s loyal black […]

“The New Massachusetts Liberty Song” in the Early Republic

On 6 Nov 1804, more than a quarter-century after the previous newspaper publication of “The New Massachusetts Liberty Song” that I’ve found, a letter was addressed to the Virginia Argus in Richmond.It read:Mr. [Samuel] Pleasants,When...Show More Summary

The 2018 Boston Massacre Reenactment, 3 Mar.

On Saturday, 3 March, the Old State House Museum and a large contingent of dedicated volunteer interpreters will reenact the Boston Massacre and events surrounding that historical milestone.There will be once-a-year events for the public all afternoon. Show More Summary

“Black Experience in Concord” panel, Lincoln, 25 Feb.

On Sunday, 25 February, as part of its “Winter Learning Series,” the Friends of Minute Man Park will sponsor a panel discussion on “The Past We Never Knew: New Research and Reflections on the Black Experience in Concord.” The event description...Show More Summary

The Further Evolution of “The New Massachusetts Liberty Song”

As I discussed back here, in April 1774 the New-York Journal published a new version of “The New Massachusetts Liberty Song” that was actually less strident about Britain than the original. It may have been revised to reflect Whig talking...Show More Summary

Former Confederate Searches For Long Lost Camp Slave

I really appreciate readers and friends who continue to send me references related to the myth of the black Confederate soldier and history of camp servants (slaves). This is the first piece of evidence, however, that I have seen of a Confederate veteran, who placed a newspaper ad looking for information about his former camp […]

The “Swan Shot” that Killed Christopher Seider

On 22 February 1770, Customs service employee Ebenezer Richardson killed a young boy named Christopher Seider.Christopher was part of a crowd of boys mobbing Richardson’s house. Indeed, he had just stooped to pick up a stone when he was hit by the discharge from Richardson’s gun. Show More Summary

The Evolution of the “New Massachusetts Liberty Song”

In February 1770, as I’ve described, the musician Josiah Flagg and the printers Edes and Gill brought to the Boston public new lyrics to the tune of “The British Grenadiers.”The following month, most of the soldiers involved in the Boston...Show More Summary

Upon the Fields of Battle One Step Closer to Publication

Congratulations to Andrew Bledsoe and Andrew Lang on bringing their forthcoming collection of essays one step closer to publication. Yesterday the editors shared the cover art for Upon the Fields of Battle: Essays on the Military History of America’s Civil War, which will be published later this year by LSU Press. This volume brings together […]

Blight and Glymph Take Us Beyond Freedom

? This is a wonderful conversation between historians David Blight and Thavolia Glymph about the Civil War and the process of emancipation. It centers around a new book of essays edited by Blight and Jim Downs called Beyond Freedom: Disrupting the History of Emancipation (University of Georgia Press, 2017). The essays bring together historians who […]

“In Bedlam’s lofty Numbers discordant Yankies Sing”

On the back of the sheet of paper giving the earliest lyrics of “The New Massachusetts Liberty Song,” which I believe is at the Historical Society of Pennsylvania, someone has written another set of verses.This side is headed “Massachusetts...Show More Summary

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