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The Newf and Werner von Bachelle

In April 1861 Werner von Bachelle volunteered for service in response to President Lincoln's first call for troops. Killed at Antietam, he's a celebrity today - thanks to his faithful Newfoundland dog.

In the wake of Nat Turner – further encouragement to the American Colonization Society?

I find what follows to be worthy of introduction into the discussion about the American Colonization Society. How did the Nat Turner Rebellion impact the efforts of the ACS? Perhaps more importantly, what did the discussions of 1831/32 mean to Virginians by 1861? You’ll note that I link freely to Encyclopedia Virginia… a rich resource […]

Confederate Heritage Has Its Day at Stone Mountain

Jonathan Lee Krohn is posting some wonderful photographs on his Twitter feed at Stone Mountain, Georgia, where a Confederate flag rally is underway. It looks…

Boston’s Latest Liberty Tree

This is a photo of the Liberty Tree outside the Norman B. Leventhal Map Center at the Boston Public Library’s main building as it appeared earlier this week.There are related displays in some of the branch libraries around the city, I understand. Show More Summary

Getting to Know the Army of Tennessee

My knowledge of the Confederate army is confined mainly to the Army of Northern Virginia. As I sketch out my cultural biography of Silas Chandler,…

Marion Harland recalls some election tunes from 1844

While I spend considerable time sifting through early literature produced about the antebellum Shenandoah Valley (produced both from within and without the Valley) I’ve also found a favorite author outside the Valley who doesn’t provide perspective on Valley life… but on antebellum life in Virginia. Marion Harland (Mary Virginia Hawes Terhune), in fact, tells more about […]

Remembering Mary Katherine Goddard the Right Way

Earlier this month the Baltimore Sun reported on the installation of a historical plaque in a downtown Rite-Aid pharmacy.That drugstore is on the probable site of the Goddard print shop in 1777. On 18 January of that year, Mary Katherine...Show More Summary

A Visit To the Royall House and Slave Quarters

I’ve said before that if I could do it all over again I would have pursued a career in public history and worked at a…

A Heavy Three-Pounder in Sturbridge

Among the cannon to be fired at this weekend’s “Redcoats and Rebels” encampment at Old Sturbridge Village, I expect, will be the iron three-pounder that the museum village put back into service for Independence Day. That gun, calledShow More Summary

There She Is, Miss RebelFest 2015

Congratulations to Taneka Lewis, who has been crowned Miss RebelFest 2015. Beyond this I don’t really know what else to say. Perhaps I should just…

Numbers of American Colonization Society Life Members, as of 1849

While I’ve got a good deal of work ahead of me in creating meaningful lists and tables, the list below provides the numbers of life members of the American Colonization Society as of 1849. Regretfully, I think, as it stands alone, this list is of limited value… though I think it gives us a little […]

“Redcoats and Rebels” Returns to Sturbridge, 1-2 August

This weekend, 1-2 August, Old Sturbridge Village hosts what’s become the largest military reenactment in New England, its annual “Redcoats and Rebels” event. Though the village normally portrays the 1830s, on this weekend its fields become a pair of military camps during the War for Independence. Show More Summary

A Cultural Biography of Silas Chandler

Last month I shared a brief update concerning my book manuscript on the history and memory of Confederate camp servants and black Confederates. At the…

Has the Face of Confederate Heritage Changed in the Past 50 Years?

The most common image of Americans asserting their pride in Confederate heritage over the past few weeks has been a parade of pick-up trucks decked…

The Fight in Boston Harbor: A Vexillological Footnote

During last week’s investigation of the conflicting accounts of the June 1776 fight in Boston harbor that ended with the capture of troop transport ships from Scotland, Boston 1775 reader Peter Ansoff sent a message with some additional information. Show More Summary

“…time would terminate the domestic contact of the races in the United States.”

As I mentioned yesterday, in the course of looking through my notes to compile a couple of lists for a blog post or two, I ran across something that I had forgotten. When rereading it, I thought it might be of value to go ahead and post it. It might come as a surprise to […]

The Internet Never Forgets

You may remember a few months ago a story that I covered concerning two North Carolina high school students, who were photographed waving Confederate flags…

Remembering Revere in Revere

The city of Revere on Boston’s North Shore was named after Paul Revere in 1871, just a decade after Henry W. Longfellow’s poem turned the silversmith into a historical celebrity.This weekend Revere Beach is hosting its annual International Sand Sculpting Festival. Show More Summary

Calling All Public Historians

Yesterday’s post about my good friend John Hennessy left me wondering what, if anything, has taken place or is being planned in museums, historical societies…

John Hennessy Leads the Way

There is no public historian that I respect more than John Hennessy, who is currently the National Park Service’s chief historian at the Fredericksburg &…

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