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American Civil War Museum Taking Shape

We now have an artist’s rendering of what the new American Civil War Museum will look like along the James River in Richmond, Virginia. The new building is the culmination of the recent merger between the Museum of the Confederacy and American Civil War Center at Historic Tredegar. The new two-story building will have 39,818... Continue reading

Looking for Samuel Adams’s Family

I’ve been writing about Samuel “Rat-trap” Adams, a well-known character in Boston who died in 1855. He was honored as a suvivor of the Revolution, and he owned a red and white striped flag that he said had been flown from a pole on Essex...Show More Summary

Virginia Flaggers Interpret Image of Silas and Andrew Chandler

[This posting was no doubt prompted by the news that the famous image of Andrew and Silas has been donated to the Library of Congress.] And once again we are reminded that it’s about heritage, not history. You would think that “restoring the honor” would at least involve honoring what we now know about this... Continue reading

Samuel Adams on Samuel Adams

Yesterday I mentioned James Spear Loring’s Hundred Boston Orators, an oft-reprinted collection of profiles of prominent Bostonians from the late eighteenth and early nineteenth centuries. As his biographical subjects Loring chose the...Show More Summary

The Leftist Take-Over of College Board

Conservatives such as Stanley Kurtz can’t seem to say enough about the recent revisions made to College Board’s AP US History Curriculum. These changes will go into effect for this school year. Kurtz and others believe that the new curriculum reflects a dangerous turn to the left, though in the entire article the author fails... Continue reading

“Rat-trap Adams’s argumentation”

(I keep finding mid-nineteenth-century stuff about Samuel “Rat-trap” Adams, putting off my promised discussion of his youth in the Revolutionary period. But I’ll get to that topic eventually.) In changing their form of government from a town to a city in 1822, Bostonians deprived political orators without office like Samuel Adams of a forum. Show More Summary

Alonzo Cushing, Harry Reese and the Issue over Medals of Honor. . .

Lt. Alonzo Cushing News broke last night that Lt. Alonzo Cushing will receive a Medal of Honor and the reaction from those in the Civil War community has thus far been overwhelmingly positive. "At long last," "finally," "it's about time"...these are just some of the common statements I have seen from bloggers and facebookers. Show More Summary

Alonzo Cushing and the Medal of Honor

The soldier in the image is Lt. Alonzo Cushing, who is set to receive a Medal of Honor on September 15, 2014, 151+ years after his death at Gettysburg on July 3, 1863. Of the following facts, there is no dispute or doubt: Alonzo Cushing was a brave and very capable young soldier who died as a hero. Show More Summary

5K run to be held at Lincoln’s summer home

President Abraham Lincoln spent three of his presidential summers at what is now known as President Lincoln’s Cottage  on the grounds of the Armed Forces Retirement Home in Washington. The picturesque 250-acre grounds, which are rarely open to the public, will be used by runners participating in a 5K cross-country run on Sept. Show More Summary

ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, Confederate Heritage Version

You had to know that at some point we would see an ALS Ice Bucket Challenge video that included a Confederate flag. This is pretty much what I envisioned. Enjoy [Uploaded to YouTube on August 26, 2014]

Wire-Worker Adams at Boston’s Last Town Meetings

The wire-worker Samuel Adams was a prominent character in nineteenth-century Boston, as Kathryn Griffith described in her recent profile for the Bostonian Society. He started the century as town crier before going into the business of manufacturing screens and other wire objects. Show More Summary

Shameless self-promotion, part 906….

Time for some shameless self-promotion. Over the weekend, I signed off on the page galleys for my newest book, The Devil’s to Pay: John Buford at Gettysburg. A History and Walking Tour. The file has been sent to the printer, and in about...Show More Summary

Samuel Adams the Wire-worker

In two postings on the Bostonian Society’s blog, Kathryn Griffith just profiled Samuel Adams the wire-worker, source of the striped cloth in the society’s collection that’s become known as the “Liberty Tree Flag.”Harris wrote about this...Show More Summary

A Victory For the Good Guys

Last week I shared the news that the iconic image of Andrew and Silas Chandler had been donated to the Library of Congress. Over the weekend The Washington Post picked up the story. The title of the article makes it perfectly clear that the image does not show two men going off to war voluntarily.... Continue reading

“The Lingering Stain of Slavery”

As the illuminating map generated by that study shows, children born in some regions—Salt Lake City and San Jose, Calif., for example—have a reasonable shot of moving up the social ladder. By contrast, many parts of the former Confederacy, it seems, are now the places where the American dream goes to die. Why is that... Continue reading

Ten books that influenced me

I received the following challenge: List 10 books that have stayed with you in some way. Don’t over think it. They don’t have to be the “right” books or great works of literature, just books that have impacted you in some way. So, here goes, in no particular order: 1. Show More Summary

What Will Happen with the Sawin House?

Back in 2012, I noted that there was a discussion about tearing down the Sawin House in Natick. The oldest parts of that building are said to date back to 1696 and the first English settlers in that town, which was originally set aside for Native American converts to Christianity. Show More Summary

When Confederate Veterans Came North

Apart from the famous reunions at Gettysburg most of our images of Confederate and Union veterans reunions took place in the South. They typically involved the dedication of a monument or an entire battlefield. What we don’t know enough about involve examples of Confederate veterans traveling north. One such example took place in 1910 when... Continue reading

Half a Million Steps Along the Freedom Trail

Big congratulations to Charles Bahne for reaching the “half a million copies in print” milestone with his Compete Guide to Boston’s Freedom Trail!This paperback is not only a thorough and affordable little guide to Boston’s most famous historic sites from the Revolutionary and Federalist eras, but it’s also a fine example of micro-publishing. Show More Summary

“The Enmity Between North and South Is Dead”

From my southern Georgia grandparents’ estate, a bit of Lost Cause children’s culture, published 1914. pic.twitter.com/4AdsvibMWb — Shane Landrum (@cliotropic) August 23, 2014

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