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What Did They Call Steve Perry (Eberhart)?

I picked up this little screenshot from one of the Facebook pages devoted to spreading the myth of the black Confederate. This is Steve Perry, who actually went by Steve […]

An open letter from the populists of the 1890s to the populists of today

Dear unhappy voters of 2016: We keep hearing you called populists and, to put it in your vernacular, you had one job and you’re doing it wrong. Like you, we were concerned about an America on “the verge of moral, political, and material ruin” in which “corruption dominates the ballot-box, the Legislatures, the Congress and […]

Petersburg battlefield authorized to grow by more than 7,000 acres

The National Park Service gained congressional authorization Dec. 8 to expand the borders of the Petersburg National Battlefield by 7,238 acres following a vote in the Senate. That move could eventually make it one of the largest historical parks in the country, according to the Civil War Trust. The Petersburg park, previously limited to 2,740 […]

“The soldiers appear to be very uneasy with the officers elected”

Yesterday I quoted briefly from a letter that Mark Hopkins of Great Barrington sent to the Massachusetts Council on 30 Mar 1776. Hopkins’s whole report (as transcribed in Peter Force’s American Archives) is an interesting snapshot of...Show More Summary

Sam Wineburg on Fake History and Digital Media Literacy

I couldn’t be more pleased with the reception to my article on fake history and its implications for how we teach history, which was published yesterday at Smithsonian. My hope […]

“Capt. Ingersoll was tried by a Court Martial”

In 1766, at the age of thirty-one, Peter Ingersoll opened a tavern and inn in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. (It still exists in greatly expanded form as a bed-and-breakfast called the Wainwright Inn, shown here.) He was from one of...Show More Summary

“Rhode Island’s Revolutionary Artillery” in Newport, 8 Dec.

On Thursday, 8 December, I’ll speak at the Newport Historical Society on the topic “The Launch of Rhode Island’s Revolutionary Artillery.” I wrote about that development in The Road to Concord, but for this talk I’m assembling more information...Show More Summary

Fake News Meets Fake History

I am happy to share with you my first piece to appear at Smithsonian.com on the influence of fake news stories on the 2016 presidential election and its implications for […]

Oney Judge and “the President’s Wishes”

As I reported yesterday, George Washington has been our richest President so far. Most of his property consisted of land, both plantations in Virginia and unsettled claims to the west, and slaves. A lot of those slaves had come to his...Show More Summary

How Rich Were the Early Presidents?

Wikipedia’s entry on the wealth of U.S. Presidents has been updated with an estimate—and, in the absence of full financial disclosure, it can only be an estimate—of President-elect Donald Trump’s wealth.The original source for the other estimates is this article and chart from 24/7 Wall St. Show More Summary

Weather Report for 4 December 1775

Last month Timothy Abbott shared on Facebook a glimpse of life in the British camp on Bunker’s Hill in late 1775. After the battle of 17 June, the British army had fortified those heights, securing the whole Charlestown peninsula from...Show More Summary

Hancock Avenue Gate Update

The Hancock Avenue Gate, which is being constructed by the National Park Service, is an[...] The post Hancock Avenue Gate Update appeared first on Gettysburg Daily.

The Decline of Civil War Round Tables

My good friend John Hennessy posted some thoughts earlier today about his recent experiences presenting in front of Civil War Round Tables. While John references the decline in membership and […]

New Education Center at the Paul Revere House

Years back, I gave a teachers’ workshop at the Paul Revere House in the North End. It took place upstairs in the neighboring Pierce-Hichborn house.As I recall, we had about two dozen people crowded into a small, irregularly shaped room with sloping ceilings. Show More Summary

David Blight, Frederick Douglass, and the 2016 Election

Some of you may know that David Blight is close to completing a biography of Frederick Douglass that is slated for publication late next year. This talk on Douglass at […]

Virginia conservation group agrees to buy site of Malvern Hill battle

The Capital Region Land Conservancy of Virginia has agreed to pay $6.5 million for the 875-acre Malvern Hill Farm, site of some of the fiercest fighting during the final battle of the Seven Days Battles of 1862. Plans are to preserve the bucolic parcel that still closely resembles its Civil War appearance. The Battle of Malvern […]

Putting Down Rebels

The first ten issues of the Rebels comic book have been collected in a single volume from Dark Horse. The series was conceived and scripted by Brian Wood on the model of his Northlanders series about Vikings: a variety of stories—different characters, different points of view, different lengths—all drawn one from extended historical conflict. Show More Summary

AASLH Reconsiders Confederate Memorials and Monuments

The next issue of the AASLH‘s quarterly magazine, History News, will focus on the ongoing debate about Confederate monuments and memorials. The organization has focused a good deal of attention […]

John McMurtry: “He did not know it was loaded”

On 1 Dec 1775, Pvt. Aaron Wright, stationed in Cambridge, wrote in his diary about a fellow rifleman:John M’Murtry, in Capt. [James] Chambers’ company, killed John Penn, by his rifle going off, when, he says, he did not know it was loaded. Show More Summary

Dylann Roof’s Civil War Memory

This week I am busy reading through drafts from the contributors to my book on how the Civil War is currently being interpreted at museums and historic sites. It involves […]

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