All Blogs / Academics / History / US History / Popular


Matching Up the Stories of the Fight in Boston Harbor

Last week I started quoting lengthy passages from an 1835 United Service Journal article about the capture of ships carrying men of the 71st Regiment of Foot in Boston harbor, said to be extracted from letters that a young Scottish officer wrote to his sister. Show More Summary

Reading List for ‘The North’s Civil War’

I am getting close to finalizing the reading list for my research seminar at the American Antiquarian Society in Worcester, which I will teach this…

Dividing the Prizes from Scotland

In June 1776, Gen. Artemas Ward wrote to his commander-in-chief, Gen. George Washington, with news of the fight in Boston harbor:P.S. June 17. I have just received information that the Continental Privateers have taken and brought into...Show More Summary

New to the Civil War Memory Library 07/23

Ta-Nehisi Coates, Between the World and Me (Spiegel and Grau, 2015). Elizabeth A. De Wolfe, The Murder of Mary Bean and Other Stories (Kent State…

The 48th/150th: The End

The Remnants of the First State Flag Presented to the 48th Pennsylvaniain September 1861 (pacivilwarflags.org) 150 years ago today...on July 22, 1865, the 48th Pennsylvania Veteran Volunteer Infantry would cease to any longer exist. The regiment was disbanded, its soldiers and officers mustered out of service, its veterans returning to their homes. Show More Summary

“A tolerable cannonade ensued”

Here’s yet another contemporaneous account of the capture of British troop transports in Boston harbor in June 1776, this time from the ranking army officer aboard those ships: Lt. Col. Archibald Campbell (shown here).Campbell’s letter to his commander, Gen. Show More Summary

“Upon which an Engagement began”

Yesterday’s account by a Massachusetts artillerist of a battle with British troop transports in Boston harbor mentioned “a fine privateer Brigt. commanded by Capt. Harding of New Haven.”That brig had actually been commissioned and equipped by the colony of Connecticut. Show More Summary

Projecting the financial costs and gains of colonizing emancipated slaves

This is the one instance in this series, where I’ll allow the pamphlet’s authors to speak for themselves. What did they see as both the financial costs and gains in colonizing emancipated slaves? Captain Paul Cuffee, from actual experiment, estimated the expense of transporting free person of colour to Africa, at 60 dollars each. The […]

“This Time We Aren’t Fighting the Yankees”

With the release of Harper Lee’s new book, Go Set a Watchman: A Novel, I decided to go back and re-read To Kill a Mockingbird…

The Fight from the Other Side

For the past few days I’ve been quoting an 1835 account written from the perspective of a young British officer captured in Boston harbor in June 1776.That article names “Colonel Crofts” as the American official who took charge of him and his fellow prisoners. Show More Summary

Encouraged discussion about Confederate monument removal… expedites monument removal?

One of the arguments I’ve read over the last week or two, is about the fight over monuments. Wait, now… let me be clear. It’s this part of that discussion… Does encouraging discussion of monument removal open a forum that encourages monument removal. Does it, perhaps, even increase the probability that monuments WILL BE removed? […]

Confederate Iconography and the “Dream” of White America

A week later and I am still digesting Ta-Nehisi Coates’s new book, Between the World and Me. I read it in two sittings and it…

Escape from Connecticut?

The further the British officer’s story printed in the United Service Journal in 1835 goes on, the more melodramatic and less credible it becomes. At first the narrative sticks pretty closely to the documented experiences of the officers of the 71st Regiment. Show More Summary

Bvt. Lt. Col. William Wallace Rogers, forgotten cavalryman

Capt. William W. Rogers, post-war Today, we have a forgotten cavalrymen post on Capt. William Wallace Rogers by his descendant, Bvt. Lt. Col. John Nesbitt, III (U.S. Army, retired). Rogers served with honor in the Civil War and in the...Show More Summary

Why Threading the Needle Between Soldier and Cause is Doomed to Fail

The call to remove Confederate monuments shows no signs of letting up. Many people who supported the removal of the Confederate flag from the state…

“A proceeding which we could not but regard as traitorous”

Yesterday’s installment from the 1835 United Service Journal article ended with the unnamed, and perhaps fictional or composite, author becoming a prisoner in Boston. He and comrades in His Majesty’s 71st Regiment had sailed into Boston...Show More Summary

“…our obligation to repair the injuries inflicted on Africa”

Picking-up from the post of July 15… today’s transcription covers 1) the willingness of colonists to be removed to the proposed colony, 2) the argument against the mindset of those who considered Africans as a lower race, and 3) various features of the new colony, demonstrating its suitability in climate and resources. But it is […]

A Conversation Between David Blight and Greg Downs

I watched this live a few months ago and was hoping CUNY would eventually upload it for public viewing. It really is a wonderful conversation…

Witness the End of Sons of Confederate Veterans

Consider the following evidence. Evidence A Gary Feis, a contractor from North Carolina on a week-long tour of Virginia battlefields, wore a camouflage cap embroidered…

Confederate-inspired U.S. Military Service?

My friend, Richard Williams, posted something of interest this morning, and it’s got me wondering. I know how people like Robert E. Lee and Stonewall Jackson touched something within me, and inspired a sense of duty… honor… and, frankly, I knew from an early age that I was going to serve my country. It wasn’t […]

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC