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The latest on Mochizuki

Once in every six months there’s a flurry of online excitement about Mochizuki’s alleged proof of the abc-conjecture. It seems to be that time of the year again. The twitter-account of the ever optimistic @math_jin is probably the best source for (positive) news about IUT/ABC. He now announces the latest version of Yamashita’s ‘summary’ of […]

Spatial models for demographic trends?

Jon Minton writes: You may be interested in a commentary piece I wrote early this year, which was published recently in the International Journal of Epidemiology, where I discuss your work on identifying an aggregation bias in one of...Show More Summary

Bathroom, Mathroom

For World Toilet Day, an appreciation of the most mathematically interesting room in the house -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Graphics software is not a tool that makes your graphs for you. Graphics software is a tool that allows you to make your graphs.

I had an email exchange with someone the other day. He had a paper with some graphs that I found hard to read, and he replied by telling me about the software he used to make the graphs. It was fine software, but the graphs were, nonetheless, unreadable. Show More Summary

Computing marginal likelihoods in Stan, from Quentin Gronau and E. J. Wagenmakers

Gronau and Wagemakers write: The bridgesampling package facilitates the computation of the marginal likelihood for a wide range of different statistical models. For models implemented in Stan (such that the constants are retained), executing the code bridge_sampler(stanfit) automatically produces an estimate of the marginal likelihood. Show More Summary

My talk tomorrow (Fri) 10am at Columbia

I’m speaking for the statistics undergraduates tomorrow (Fri 17 Nov) 10am in room 312 Mathematics Bldg. I’m not quite sure what I’ll talk about: maybe I’ll do again my talk on statistics and sports, maybe I’ll speak on the statistical crisis in science. Show More Summary

No no no no no on “The oldest human lived to 122. Why no person will likely break her record.”

I came across this news article by Brian Resnick entitled: The oldest human lived to 122. Why no person will likely break her record. Even with better medicine, living past 120 years will be extremely unlikely. I was skeptical, and I...Show More Summary

Tips when conveying your research to policymakers and the news media

Following up on a conversation regarding publicizing scientific research, Jim Savage wrote: Here’s a report that we produced a few years ago on prioritising potential policy levers to address the structural budget deficit in Australia. Show More Summary

Henry Fowler's Favorite Theorem

The chair of the mathematics department at Diné College talks about what the Pythagorean Theorem intersects with his identity as a Navajo -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Want safe travels? Find freeways with these features

(Brigham Young University) A solid median, wide shoulders, minimal hills -- and a high speed limit? Brigham Young University researchers explore freeway features that minimize crash risk.

New tool predicts risk of heart attack in older surgery patients

(University of California - Los Angeles Health Sciences) A tool designed to more accurately predict the risk of heart attack in older patients undergoing non-cardiac surgery works significantly better than traditional risk assessment tools. By having more accurate information, older patients and their physicians can make an informed decision on whether to undergo surgery.

Math gets real in strong, lightweight structures

(Rice University) Rice University materials scientists lead a project to turn strong, light and compressible schwarzites from theory to reality with three-dimensional printers. The resulting materials share their properties from the nano- to the macroscale.

UNN scientists are studying the problem of modeling the cognitive dissonance phenomenon

(Lobachevsky University) Lobachevsky University (UNN) scientists, Associate Professor of the History and Theory of International Relations Department Alexander Petukhov and Head of the Department of Psychophysiology Sofya Polevaya, are studying the modeling of the cognitive dissonance phenomenon. Show More Summary

New model estimates odds of events that trigger sudden cardiac death

(PLOS) A new computational model of heart tissue allows researchers to estimate the probability of rare heartbeat irregularities that can cause sudden cardiac death. The model, developed by Mark Walker and colleagues from Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, and IBM Research, Yorktown Heights, N.Y., is presented in PLOS Computational Biology.

3 more articles (by others) on statistical aspects of the replication crisis

A bunch of items came in today, all related to the replication crisis: – Valentin Amrhein points us to this fifty-authored paper, “Manipulating the alpha level cannot cure significance testing – comments on Redefine statistical significance,” by Trafimow, Amrhein, et al., who make some points similar to those made by Blake McShane et al. Show More Summary

An inverse theorem for Kemperman’s inequality

I have just uploaded to the arXiv the paper “An inverse theorem for Kemperman’s inequality“, submitted to a special issue of the Proceedings of the Steklov Institute of Mathematics in honour of Sergei Konyagin. It concerns an inequality of Kemperman discussed previously in this blog, namely that whenever are compact non-empty subsets of a compact […]

What is the computational power of the universe?

(National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)) Can a close look at the universe give us solutions to problems too difficult for a computer -- even if we built a computer larger than a planet? Physicist Stephen Jordan reflects on this question in a new NIST video, along with a scientific paper that considers one particular tough problem the universe might answer.

“What is a sandpit?”

From Private Eye 1399, in Pseuds Corner: What is a sandpit? Sandpits are residential interactive workshops over five days involving 20-30 participants; the director, a team of expert mentors, and a number of independent stakeholders....Show More Summary

WPI research detects when online reviews and news are a paid-for pack of lies

(Worcester Polytechnic Institute) A researcher at Worcester Polytechnic Institute (WPI) is using computer science to help fight the growing problem of crowdturfing -- a troublesome phenomenon in which masses of online workers are paid to post phony reviews, circulate malicious tweets, and even spread fake news. Show More Summary

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