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Recent Death from Diet Supplement

Eloise Aimee Parry, 21, died on April 12 after taking 8 diet pills she bought online. The pills contained 2,4-dinitrophenol (DNP), which is essentially an illegal weight loss aid. The case illustrates the failure of current regulations to protect the public from potentially dangerous drugs. There are many factors that contribute to this failure. First, [...]

Naturopathy Leaks

In a recent editorial David Brooks makes the point that privacy is important and we should not relinquish it lightly. Among other benefits of privacy, he states: There has to be a zone where half-formed thoughts and delicate emotions can grow and evolve, without being exposed to the harsh glare of public judgment. There has [...]

How Would You Like Your Reality Augmented?

With devices such as Google Glass and Oculus Rift just around the corner, the stage is set for game-changing technological interfaces between ourselves and the world to shake up how we interact with and perceive our environment. Technology such as Pranav Mistry’s SixthSense device which he showcased on a recent TED talk looks set to […]

Plastics, tiny penises, and human evolution

By Greg Downey.  (5000 words) An Italian study in 2012 found that men’s penises were growing smaller over time — two centimetres lost from grandfather to grandson in the twentieth century. Conservative radio bloviator Rush Limbaugh knew who to blame: … Continue reading » The post Plastics, tiny penises, and human evolution appeared first on Neuroanthropology.

Where Are The Big Ideas in Neuroscience? (Part 1)

Why are there no big ideas in neuroscience? By "big" ideas, I mean schools of thought, philosophies, or movements. Psychology has had, and continues to have, plenty of them: behaviorism, cognitivism, Freudianism, social constructionism, to name a few. Show More Summary

Is There Signal in the fMRI Noise?

A new paper in Neuroimage suggests that methods for removing head motion and physiological noise from fMRI data might be inadvertently excluding real signal as well. The authors, Molly G. Bright and Kevin Murphy of Cardiff, studied the technique called nuisance regression. Show More Summary

Spike activity 17-04-2015

Quick links from the past week in mind and brain news: The latest instalment of ‘the seductive allure of neuroscience’ has been released (aka the force awakens) – a solid study suggest spurious neuroscience adds weight to explanations. Great coverage from the BPS Research Digest. Aeon asks an interesting question: throughout evolutionary history, we never […]

Grab Your Torch and Pitchforks

I always find it disturbing to see people, especially in large crowds, apparently acting according to primitive emotions rather than enlightened thinking. It makes it seem like the veneer of civilization is paper thin, and we are not far removed from apes huddled around the monolith and hitting each other over the head with bones. [...]

Deciphering Troubled Teens’ Risk-Taking Behavior

The rebellious teenager makes everyone edgy. Their parents are an anxious lot. Their teachers are at their wit’s end trying to figure out ways to rein them in. The traffic sergeants roll their eyes in exasperation when they land up drunk behind the wheel. Sociologists are intrigued and want to know what is it that […]

Long corridors of the mind

I’ve just read Barbara Taylor‘s brilliant book The Last Asylum: A Memoir of Madness in Our Times which blends her own experiences as a patient in one of the last remaining asylums with an incisive look at the changing face of mental health care since the Victorian era. Taylor is a renowned historian but the […]

Opening the Classroom Door for Children with Autism

We can all probably remember how we were taught to swim. Some of us had parents who took us to swimming lessons in a safely constructed pool at the local YMCA, with numerous, trained adults right next to us in the pool and floaties on our arms, while we paddled on a kickboard for as […]

Mission to Mars

Mars is an interesting place. The more we study the surface of the planet with our various robot labs, the more interesting it becomes. This is one of the reasons that it is very enticing to send people to Mars, but there is debate about the feasibility of any mission to Mars over the next [...]

Autistic Traits Aren't Linked To Brain Anatomy?

According to a large study just published in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders, there's no correlation between brain anatomy and self-reported autistic traits. Dutch researchers P. Cedric M. P. Koolschijn and colleagues...Show More Summary

Trends in Cognitive, Computational, and Systems Neuroscience 2015

What are the Hot Topics in cognitive neuroscience? We could ask these people, or we could take a more populist approach by looking at conference abstracts. I consulted the program for the recent Cognitive Neuroscience Society meeting (CNS 2015) and made a word cloud using Wordle. Show More Summary

Sordid tale of a study of cognitive behavioral therapy for schizophrenia gone bad

What motivates someone to publish that paper without checking it? Laziness? Naivety? Greed? Now that’s one to ponder. – Neuroskeptic, Science needs vigilantes. We need to Make the world safe for post-publication peer review (PPR) commentary. Ensure appropriate rewards for … Continue reading »

FDA and Homeopathy

The skeptical community is abuzz with the announcement by the FDA’s announcement that they are reviewing the “regulatory framework” of homeopathic products and are open to public input. We have written about this at Science-Based Medicine, and as you can imagine, this is a serious topic of discussion among the editors. Background The FDA regulates [...]

Learning Skills and Psychosis

As a doctor of clinical psychology, I address differently the problem of psychosis. I approach psychosis as a result of trauma and mental phenomena as opposed focusing on the brain, the empirical and the medical model of mental illness. I was very recently reading an article on the subject of new advances in medications to […]

The Wilberforce Award: The population puzzle part 2

Our Neuroanthropology blog has moved to PLoS Blogs, and if you are interested in the topic of sustainable population growth, you may be interested in The Culture of Poverty Debate, The Culture of Poverty Debate continued, and Culture of Poverty: Analysis and Policy. Attention to the Population Puzzle has been gaining attention with blogs written by: […]

Neuroanthropology.net at 1,000,000

Neuroanthropology.net just broke through the 1,000,000 visits mark! We’ve done that in three years. Our very post came in December 2007. Even though Greg and I have moved over to Neuroanthropology PLoS, this site has continued to generate impressive traffic since September 1st. Here are some of the posts that got us over the top: […]

Announcing the Notre Dame Hub: Taking Students’ Academic Lives Online

The Hub @ Notre Dame is now live! The Hub takes students’ academic lives online, providing a platform for exploring ideas, presenting their work, and social networking within an academic community. I initiated this project in the spring of 2009 at Notre Dame, so it is wonderful to see it come to fruition. Here is […]

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