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Does Psychology Need SWaG? The Ethics of Naturalistic Experiments

Diederik Stapel. Brian Wansink. Nicolas Guéguen. Anyone who's been following recent debates over research integrity in psychology will recognize these as three prolific and succesful academic psychologists who have suffered a total (Stapel)...Show More Summary

Waneta Hoyt: The Serial Killer Paper

I just learned about a truly remarkable case in which a doctor apparently wrote a paper about a serial killer who murdered her five children - without realizing what had happened. It's an old case, but it doesn't seem to be widely known...Show More Summary

Sexual Violence is Horrible, But First Look at Causes Outside the Brain

"At the brain level, empathy for social exclusion of personalized women recruited areas coding the affective component of pain (i.e., anterior insula and cingulate cortex), the somatosensory components of pain (i.e., posterior insula...Show More Summary

Debunking Phrenology with 21st Century Methods

Modern neuroscience has been accused of being a 'new phrenology' but now neuroscientists have conducted a modern evaluation of phrenological claims using neuroscience methods. In an enjoyable new preprint called An empirical, 21st century...Show More Summary

Is Reproducibility Really Central to Science?

In a new paper in the Journal of Experimental & Theoretical Artificial Intelligence, Chris Drummond takes aim at the 'reproducibility movement' which has lately risen to prominence in science. As one of the early advocates for this movement, I was interested to see what Drummond had to say. Show More Summary

Least Popular Posts of 2017

2017 was a really bad year. The U.S. is more divided than ever, the truth is meaningless, well-researched journalism is called FAKE NEWS, the President lies once every minute, white supremacist rallies have been normalized, some tech...Show More Summary

In a World of Never Ending Tension, Seek Compassionate Neutrality

Amidst the rising tensions in the world around us, people are finding themselves in the unique position of having to make hard decisions about choosing passive observation or active participation, causing some to toss their opinions into the fray of the multitude of voices speaking out within society today. In contrast to what we have […]

Safety Nets: Travel After Brain Injury

There’s so much out there that beckons—family, friends, ethnic textiles, and, more recently, the writers’ world. I am compelled to answer the call—all the calls! I reject the invalid role that my bloody brain repeatedly tries to thrust on me. In order to live a full life, I’ve had to learn to set up safety […]

Social Media Anxiety Disorders: What’s Going on in the Brain?

Too much of anything can be dangerous, and social media is no exception. Today many of us spend more time on internet-enabled devices than even sleeping. Due to this overindulgence in social media and the internet, we may become socially reclusive rather than inclusive. This, in turn, may lead to various physical and mental health […]

Amygdala Stimulation in the Absence of Emotional Experience Enhances Memory for Neutral Objects

The amygdala is a small structure located within the medial temporal lobes (MTL), consisting of a discrete set of nuclei. It has a reputation as the “fear center” or “emotion center” of the brain, although it performs multiple functions. Show More Summary

The Dangers of Antidepressants

A fortunate knock of luck is always welcomed by scientists and researchers, yet any treatment modalities should be novel by design rather than by serendipity. Antidepressants were discovered by chance in the 1950s, and it seems that they suffer from specific deficiencies when it comes to their clinical effectiveness and safety profile. It is something […]

How Community Mental Health Care Can Make a Major Difference

The deinstitutionalization of people with mental illness restored their rights, but caused plenty of problems as well -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

Think Trump Will Be More Inclusive after Winning?

Behavioral research suggests the answer is probably no -- Read more on ScientificAmerican.com

The Neurological Basis of Anxiety

A person suffering from an anxiety disorder experiences neurology-based changes in mood and bodily functions that are discussed in more detail in this article. As with anxiety, various personality traits and emotional responses are by-products of the interaction between our genetic coding and environmental influences. Show More Summary

Secrets of a "Zombie" Fungus Revealed

A parasitic fungus that controls the behaviour of fruit flies has, for the first time, been studied in the lab. In a fascinating preprint posted on Biorxiv, researchers Carolyn Elya et al. report how they discovered the pathogen in the wild near Berkeley, California. Show More Summary

Do Today’s Technological Advances Threaten Our Species?

A lot of public back-and-forth banter has been going on lately between two giant tech personalities: Elon Musk and Mark Zuckerberg. Their public debate centers on whether or not artificial intelligence (AI) represents an existential threat to humanity. Show More Summary

The Sad World of Uncited Papers

A Nature News feature examines academic papers that have never been cited. According to author Richard Van Noorden, by some estimates up to half of all papers have yet to receive their first citation 5 years after publication, and even 10% of Nobel Prizewinners' papers go uncited. However, Van Noorden reports that these estimates are far too high. Show More Summary

The Emerging Neuroscience of Mind-Body Medicine

For years as a hard-nosed neuroscientist, I’ve been baffled by the success of clinical techniques that my wife, Chris Gilbert M.D. Ph.D., has pioneered to diagnose and cure illnesses such as back pain, chronic fatigue, stomach ailments, and recurring respiratory infections. The reason for my head-scratching is that many of Dr. Chris’s diagnostic tests and […]

Gambling Addiction: Is it as Bad as Cocaine?

Is gambling an addictive pathology that causes changes in the brain and requires treatment? Or is it merely a compulsive behaviour? This question has long kept the medical world confused. Traditionally, it was thought that addiction could happen only when a person is dependent on some physically existing substance. However, now this traditional way of […]

How Does Starting School Early Impact Educational Attainment?

A singular cutoff point for school entry results in age differences between children of the same grade. In many school systems, September-born children, begin compulsory education in September of the year in which they turn five, making them relatively older than summer born children who begin school aged four. Research on these annually age-grouped cohorts […]

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