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BIDMC scientists survey the state of sleep science

(Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center) Sleep remains an enduring mystery with major clinical relevance, according to a review by Thomas Scammell, M.D., of Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center (BIDMC) and colleagues. In recent decades,...Show More Summary

Cultivating cool-for-cash-crop

(American Society of Agronomy) Canola and camelina are cool-season crops that produce oilseeds. Soon they may find a home in California fields as a rotational crop with smart water use and high demand.

Wednesday assorted links

1. “From Leo Strauss to the Beach Boys.”  (NYT; shouldn’t it be the other way around?) 2. “Then Bryan said, “I think libertarians should be at least as libertarian as my father.””  Here is the video of the debate. 3. Robin Hanson, reluctant intellectual bouncer and eager egalitarian. Show More Summary

Study says drugs could be developed cheaper and faster

(University of Waterloo) Chemists at the University of Waterloo, SCIEX and Pfizer have discovered a new way to help the pharmaceutical industry identify and test new drugs, which could revolutionize drug development, and substantially reduce the cost and time drugs need to reach their market.

Hidden no more: First-ever global view of transshipment in commercial fishing industry

(Global Fishing Watch) A new report released today presents the first global map of transshipment, a major pathway for illegally caught and unreported fish to enter the seafood market. Also associated with drug smuggling and slave labor, it is Illegal in many cases, and has been largely invisible until now. Show More Summary

The genetics behind being Not Like Daddy

(EMBO) A common strategy to create high-yielding plants is hybrid breeding. However, getting the inbred lines in the first place can be a hassle. In maize, the use of so-called 'haploid inducers' provides a short cut to this cumbersome procedure, allowing to produce inbred lines in just one generation. Show More Summary

Lower the Bar, Save Your Marriage

Many people marry and soon find that their spouse is annoying — not constantly of course, but more than they expected. Fairy tales and romantic novels suggest that a good marriage is an effortless, happily ever after experience, with the emphasis on effortless. Rabbi Yosef […]

Science versus the 'Horatio Alger myth'

In a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE, Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have taken a condensed matter physics concept usually applied to the way substances such as ice freeze, called "frustration," and applied it to a simple social network model of frustrated components. Show More Summary

Up to 600 waterfowl die in western Idaho from avian cholera

An estimated 500 to 600 ducks and geese have died due to avian cholera in western Idaho.

Did the Civil War Sesquicentennial Ever End?

I am getting ahead of myself, but over the past few days I’ve been thinking about writing a short book on the Civil War sesquicentennial once I finish my book […]

Explore the Amazon Rainforest with New Virtual-Reality Film

Experience the Amazon rainforest's beauty and biodiversity via a new virtual-reality film.

CubeSats: Shaping possibilities in space

(NASA/Johnson Space Center) For more than a decade, CubeSats, or small satellites, have paved the way to low-Earth orbit for commercial companies, educational institutions, and non-profit organizations. These small satellites offer opportunities...Show More Summary

Science versus the 'Horatio Alger myth'

(DOE/Los Alamos National Laboratory) In a new study published today in the journal PLOS ONE, Los Alamos National Laboratory scientists have taken a condensed matter physics concept usually applied to the way substances such as ice freeze, called 'frustration,' and applied it to a simple social network model of frustrated components. Show More Summary

Postwar economic policies fueled prosperity decades later, UT Dallas study finds

(University of Texas at Dallas) New research by an economist at The University of Texas at Dallas challenges accepted notions about the 1950s postwar economy and argues that policies from that era laid a foundation that continues to protect the economy from volatility in inflation and gross domestic product.

IURTC, Rose-Hulman Ventures collaborate on record number of technology projects in 2016

(Indiana University) A collaboration makes it possible for engineering students and project managers at Rose-Hulman Institute of Technology to create prototypes of devices invented by researchers at Indiana University.

We read emotions based on how the eye sees

(Association for Psychological Science) We use others' eyes -- whether they're widened or narrowed -- to infer emotional states, and the inferences we make align with the optical function of those expressions, according to new research published in Psychological Science, a journal of the Association for Psychological Science. Show More Summary

Researchers reverse high blood pressure in offspring of hypertensive rats

(University of Iowa) University of Iowa researchers have demonstrated how harmful health complications passed from mother rats to their offspring can be reversed. The tests may point the way toward preventing the transfer of certain health conditions from human mothers to their children.

Researchers gain insight into a physical phenomenon that leads to earthquakes

Scientists have gotten better at predicting where earthquakes will occur, but they're still in the dark about when they will strike and how devastating they will be.

The genetics behind being Not Like Daddy

A common strategy to create high-yielding plants is hybrid breeding - crossing two different inbred lines to obtain characteristics superior to each parent. However, getting the inbred lines in the first place can be a hassle. Inbred lines consist of genetically uniform individuals and are created through numerous generations of self-crossing. Show More Summary

Critters, plants and waste offer a more sustainable supply of catalysts

(American Chemical Society) From earthworm guts to mining waste, scientists are exploring a wide range of new sources of catalysts that could help us make medicines, fuels and electronics in a more sustainable way. The cover story in Chemical & Engineering News (C&EN), the weekly newsmagazine of the American Chemical Society, reports on the search.

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