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Where do rubber trees get their rubber?

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Sustainable Resource Science (CSRS) in Japan along with collaborators at Universiti Sains Malaysia (USM) have succeeded in decoding the genome sequence for Hevea brasiliensis, the natural rubber tree native to Brazil. Show More Summary

For nature, gravel-bed rivers most important feature in mountainous western North America

MISSOULA, Montana - Gravel-bed river floodplains are some of the most ecologically important habitats in North America, according to a new study by scientists from the U.S. and Canada. Their research shows how broad valleys coming out...Show More Summary

Amber fossils reveal ancient insect camouflage behavior

Insects have evolved diverse types of camouflage that have played an important role in their evolutionary success. Debris-carrying, a behavior of actively harvesting and carrying exogenous materials, is among the most fascinating and...Show More Summary

Scientists begin modeling universe with Einstein's full theory of general relativity

Research teams on both sides of the Atlantic have shown that precise modeling of the universe and its contents will change the detailed understanding of the evolution of the universe and the growth of structure in it. One hundred years...Show More Summary

Scientists uncover route for finding out what makes individuals nice or nasty

A University of Exeter scientist has helped develop an innovative mathematical model for exploring why some individuals evolve to be genetically programmed to be nice, while others stay nasty. Dr Sasha Dall, Senior Lecturer in Mathematical...Show More Summary

The Joy of Giving

In The Art of Loving, Erich Fromm wrote: “Giving is more joyous than receiving, not because it is a deprivation, but because in the act of giving lies the expression of my aliveness.” The more we give, the more we experience the world as the […]

How Psychology Made the Brexit Vote Inevitable

The U.K.'s vote to leave the E.U. was as much an emotional decision as a political one

Use of non-fit messaging may improve patient choices

When it comes to helping patients make the best choices for themselves, sometimes you have to challenge their usual way of dealing with the world, according to new research.

'Amazing protein diversity' is discovered in the maize plant

Cold Spring Harbor, NY -- The genome of the corn plant - or maize, as it's called almost everywhere except the US - "is a lot more exciting" than scientists have previously believed. So says the lead scientist in a new effort to analyze and annotate the depth of the plant's genetic resources. read more

Experts off guidance on medical marijuana for pain

Marijuana often is used to self treat chronic pain and, with 24 states legalizing medical use of the herb, experts have published guidance for physicians caring for patients who use cannabis. The paper also identified opportunities for future research required to better understand the health effects of cannabinoids.

Small brain -- astounding performance

The elephantnose fish explores objects in its surroundings by using its eyes or its electrical sense - sometimes both together. Zoologists at the University of Bonn and a colleague from Oxford have now found out how complex the processing of these sensory impressions is. Show More Summary

3-D-printed kidney helps doctors save woman's organ during complicated tumor removal

Doctors and scientists at Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City printed and used a 3D kidney to help save a patient's organ during a complicated tumor-removal procedural. The 3D-printed model allowed doctors to study the patient's...Show More Summary

Top story for cancer research

A team of researchers led by Dr. Friederike J. Gruhl and Professor Andrew C. B. Cato at Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT) are developing a three-dimensional model for prostate cancer research based on cryogels. The model will be used to reproduce natural processes and above all to examine the development and the progression of tumors. Show More Summary

Energy from sunlight: Further steps towards artificial photosynthesis

Chemists from the Universities of Basel and Zurich in Switzerland have come one step closer to generating energy from sunlight: for the first time, they were able to reproduce one of the crucial phases of natural photosynthesis with artificial molecules. Their results have been published by the journal Angewandte Chemie (international edition). read more

New era opens as first UK Robotics Week begins

A new era of innovation and discovery opens tomorrow when the first UK Robotics Week June 25 - July 1 begins. Organised by the EPSRC UK Robotics and Autonomous Systems Network (UK-RAS Network), the week opens with a series of eventsShow More Summary

Molecular scissors help evolutionary investigation

Scientists at KIT (Karlsruhe Institute of Technology) detected an important mechanism in the evolution of plant genomes: Using Arabidopsis thaliana as a model organism, they studied the formation of tandem repeat DNA sequences and found out that these sequences form if both DNA strands are broken at a significant distance from each other. Show More Summary

Female blue tits sing in the face of danger

Until now, the singing behaviour of songbirds had been mainly associated with competitive behaviour and the search for a partner. Moreover, males had long been considered to be the more active singer. Females were compared to the behaviour...Show More Summary

Political Earthquake Hits as British to Exit European Union

The United Kingdom will exit the European Union. The shock waves first hit Scotland. The secession-minded government plans to hold another independence vote. Next time a majority of Scots may see no reason to stay. Both the Conservative and Labour Parties face bitter, internecine strife. Show More Summary

Researchers devise new tool to measure polarization of light

Researchers from North Carolina State University have developed a new tool for detecting and measuring the polarization of light based on a single spatial sampling of the light, rather than the multiple samples required by previous technologies. Show More Summary

How does climate affect violence? Researchers offer new theory

Researchers have long struggled to explain why some violent crime rates are higher near the equator than other parts of the world. Now, a team of researchers have developed a model that could help explain why. This new model goes beyond the simple fact that hotter temperatures seem to be linked to more aggressive behavior. Show More Summary

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