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Claim: Tornadoes occurring earlier in “Tornado Alley”

From the American Geophysical Union | WASHINGTON, D.C. – Peak tornado activity in the central and southern Great Plains of the United States is occurring up to two weeks earlier than it did half a century ago, according to a new study whose findings could help states in “Tornado Alley” better prepare for these violent…

Fantastically Wrong: Magellan’s Strange Encounter With the 10-Foot Giants of Patagonia

In 1520, Ferdinand Magellan took time out of his busy schedule of sailing around the world to stop in what is now Patagonia, where he found a naked giant dancing and singing on the shore. Magellan ordered one of his men to make contact...Show More Summary

Passing it On: Parenthood & Mental Illness

“Aren’t you afraid he will get your disease?” This question was uttered by a colleague at a department picnic this past summer when I was still working as a college instructor. This colleague had known me for a few years. She had known me when I was still adamantly not going to have children. She […]

Evidence that high pCO2 affects protein metabolism in tropical reef corals

Early life stages of the coral Seriatopora caliendrum were used to test the hypothesis that the depression of dark respiration in coral recruits by high pCO2 is caused by perturbed protein metabolism. First, the contribution of protein anabolism to respiratory costs under high pCO2 was evaluated by measuring the aerobic respiration of S. caliendrum recruits […]

This Bizarre Organism Builds Itself a New Genome Every Time It Has Sex

Oxytricha trifallax lives in ponds all over the world. Under an electron microscope it looks like a football adorned with tassels. The tiny fringes are the cilia it uses to move around and gobble up algae. What makes Oxytricha unusual, however, is the crazy things it does with its DNA. Show More Summary

Recruiting bacteria to be technology innovation partners

For most people biofilms conjure up images of slippery stones in a streambed and dirty drains. While there are plenty of "bad" biofilms around – they even cause pesky dental plaque and a host of other more serious medical problems –Show More Summary

Australia Considering Procurement of 10 Japanese Soryu Class Submarines (SSK)

Despite political opposition and apparently contradictory ministerial statements, it appears increasingly likely that Australia will replace its Collins-class submarines with 4,200-tonne Soryu-class submarines built in Japan.Amid intense...Show More Summary

There's a problem with assuming the most intelligent candidates make the best employees

Workplace research through the 20th Century suggested that selecting for intelligence is the best way to identify good performers. General mental ability (GMA), a popular recruitment measure that maps closely to the colloquial meaning...Show More Summary

Early-life exposure to climate change impairs tropical shark survival

Sharks are one of the most threatened groups of marine animals worldwide, mostly owing to overfishing and habitat degradation/loss. Although these cartilaginous fish have evolved to fill many ecological niches across a wide range of habitats, they have limited capability to rapidly adapt to human-induced changes in their environments. Show More Summary

Kidney Donors Have Brains 'Built for Compassion'

People who donate kidneys to total strangers aren't just big-hearted, they're big-brained compared to most people, researchers say. Neurologists scanned the brains of 39 such donors and found that their brains were 9% bigger than average—with significantly greater volume in the part of the brain that deals with emotion...

Boosting global corn yields depends on improving nutrient balance

Ensuring that corn absorbs the right balance of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium is crucial to increasing global yields, a study finds. A review of data from more than 150 studies from the U.S. and other regions showed that high yields...Show More Summary

Personal news cycle of African American and Hispanic news consumers

A new national survey exploring how African Americans and Hispanics get their news reveals that the predicted digital divide, in which people of color would be left behind in the use of technology, is not playing out as many of those forecasting the digital future anticipated. The survey findings suggest a divide based on content, not technology.

Healthy humans make nice homes for viruses

The same viruses that make us sick can take up residence in and on the human body without provoking a sneeze, cough or other troublesome symptom, according to new research. On average, healthy individuals carry about five types of viruses on their bodies, the researchers report. The study is the first comprehensive analysis to describe the diversity of viruses in healthy people.

Lifesaving protocol for school children with severe allergies developed

As the number of children with food allergies in the U.S. increases, so does the risk of children having a severe, potentially life-threatening allergic reaction called anaphylaxis on school campuses. School nurses often have treatment...Show More Summary

Scientists Dissect Rare, 'Perfect' Colossal Squid

After thawing and some careful maneuvering with a forklift to get it into a tank, scientists were able to take a good look at the best-preserved specimen of the elusive colossal squid ever discovered. The 770-pound creature hauled up by a fishing boat in the Antarctic is one of just...

Intravascular ultrasound-guided intervention in patients with chronic total occlusion

A new study found that intravascular ultrasound (IVUS)-guided intervention in patients with chronic total occlusion (CTO) could improve outcomes compared to a conventional angiography-guided approach during percutaneous coronary intervention. The IVUS-CTO study is the first randomized trial to examine the clinical impact of IVUS guidance for CTO intervention.

Optical coherence tomography in primary percutaneous coronary intervention

The first randomized trial to examine serial optical coherence tomography in primary percutaneous coronary intervention was reported today.

Nanoribbon film keeps glass ice-free

Scientists who created a deicing film for radar domes have now refined the technology to work as a transparent coating for glass. The new work could keep glass surfaces from windshields to skyscrapers free of ice and fog while retaining their transparency to radio frequencies (RF).

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