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The uncertain brain: Untangling ambiguity in neural circuits

Every day humans and animals face ambiguous circumstances. If we become sick after eating, we blame the food; however, if we then fall ill without having eaten that food, the causal link becomes ambiguous. New findings from the RIKEN...Show More Summary

Evidence of link between cancer & light therapy inconclusive but warrants consideration

(BOSTON, May 23, 2016) -- Two new studies raise enough questions about a possible link between childhood cancer and light therapy for newborn jaundice that clinicians should exercise caution in prescribing the treatment for infants whose...Show More Summary

Investigational CDK4/6 inhibitor abemaciclib is active against a range of cancer types

Bottom Line: The investigational anticancer therapeutic abemaciclib, which targets CDK4 and CDK6, showed durable clinical activity when given as continuous single-agent therapy to patients with a variety of cancer types, including breast...Show More Summary

Health, wealth and social differences for adults born premature, low-birth-weight

Fewer adults who were born prematurely at low-birth weights were employed or had children and they were more likely to have lower incomes, be single and report more chronic health conditions than their normal-birth-weight-term counterparts,...Show More Summary

Neutrons probe structure of enzyme critical to development of next-generation HIV drugs

A team led by the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory used neutron analysis to better understand a protein implicated in the replication of HIV, the retrovirus that causes AIDS. The enzyme, known as HIV-1 protease, is a key drug target for HIV and AIDS therapies. read more

Are childhood stroke outcomes associated with BP, blood glucose, temperature?

Infarct (tissue damage) volume and hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) were associated with poor neurological outcomes after childhood stroke but hypertension and fever were not, according to an article published online by JAMA Neurology. After...Show More Summary

Engineers take first step toward flexible, wearable, tricoder-like device

Engineers at the University of California San Diego have developed the first flexible wearable device capable of monitoring both biochemical and electric signals in the human body. The Chem-Phys patch records electrocardiogram (EKG) heart signals and tracks levels of lactate, a biochemical that is a marker of physical effort, in real time. Show More Summary

Discovery could energize development of longer-lasting batteries

A University of Texas at Dallas researcher has made a discovery that could open the door to cellphone and car batteries that last five times longer than current ones. Dr. Kyeongjae Cho, professor of materials science and engineeringShow More Summary

Computing a secret, unbreakable key

What once took months by some of the world's leading scientists can now be done in seconds by undergraduate students thanks to software developed at the University of Waterloo's Institute for Quantum Computing, paving the way for fast,...Show More Summary

Cities try different tactics to regulate noise

WASHINGTON, D.C., May 23, 2016 - If you live in Waco, Texas, your neighbor maneuvering a gas lawn mower in the middle of the night likely wouldn't violate the decibel limit, which is eight times louder than the typical nighttime limit in the United States. read more

UCLA study identifies how brain connects memories across time

Using a miniature microscope that opens a window into the brain, UCLA neuroscientists have identified in mice how the brain links different memories over time. While aging weakens these connections, the team devised a way for the middle-aged...Show More Summary

Japanese-language MyShake app crowdsources earthquake shaking

University of California, Berkeley, scientists are releasing a Japanese version of an Android app that crowdsources ground-shaking information from smartphones to detect quakes and eventually warn users of impending jolts from nearby quakes. read more

Telephone-based cognitive behavioral therapy significantly improves menopause symptoms

SEATTLE -- Chatting on the phone with a "sleep coach" and keeping a nightly sleep diary significantly improve sleep quality and reduce insomnia in women through all stages of menopause, according to a new study published today in JAMA...Show More Summary

Nanoscale Trojan horses treat inflammation

Nanosized Trojan horses created from a patient's own immune cells have successfully treated inflammation by overcoming the body's complex defense mechanisms, perhaps leading to broader applications for treating diseases characterized...Show More Summary

Dana-Farber research presented at 2016 ASCO conference

The 52nd Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) will include more than 70 research presentations by Dana-Farber Cancer Institute investigators and will attract as many as 30,000 oncology professionals from around the world. Show More Summary

Strange sea-dwelling reptile fossil hints at rapid evolution after mass extinction

Two hundred and fifty million years ago, life on earth was in a tail-spin--climate change, volcanic eruptions, and rising sea levels contributed to a mass extinction that makes the death of the dinosaurs look like child's play. Marine life got hit hardest--96% of all marine species went extinct. Show More Summary

Harnessing the 'Natural Killer' within us to fight cancer

Our bodies are constantly and successfully fighting off the development of cells that lead to tumours - but when there is disruption to this process cancer is free to develop. Walter and Eliza Hall Institute researchers, led by Dr Sandra...Show More Summary

Blood test uncovers undiagnosed diabetes in hospital patients with high blood sugar

A retrospective review of medical records found the HbA1C test, commonly used to diagnose and manage diabetes, can effectively detect hidden disease among hospital patients with hyperglycemia, commonly known as high blood sugar. read more

Critics argued with our analysis of U.S. political inequality. Here are 5 ways they’re wrong.

In 2014 we published a study of political inequality in America, called “Testing Theories of American Politics: Elites, Interest Groups, and Average Citizens.” Our central finding was this: Economic elites and interest groups can shape U.S. government policy — but Americans who are less well off have essentially no influence over what their government does. […]

Cranky young sun could have kickstarted life on Earth

Giant solar storms may have turned early Earth's atmosphere into a cosy blanket and also helped life get going

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