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Will China Help End U.S. Farm Subsidies?

K. William Watson This morning, U.S. Trade Representative Mike Froman appeared before the Senate Finance Committee to talk and answer questions about U.S. trade policy. Most of the questions centered around trade promotion authority,...Show More Summary

New mechanism unlocked for evolution of green fluorescent protein

A primary challenge in the biosciences is to understand the way major evolutionary changes in nature are accomplished. Sometimes the route turns out to be very simple. An example of such simplicity is provided in a new publication that...Show More Summary

How creative are you? Depends where you're from

With the 'creative class' on the rise, many businesses are trying to capitalize on imagination and innovation. But when it comes to creative juices, some societies have a faster flow than others. That's because, as new research suggests, creativity is tied to culture.

Using induced pluripotent stem cells to grow new hair

In a new study from Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute (Sanford-Burnham), researchers have used human pluripotent stem cells to generate new hair. The study represents the first step toward the development of a cell-based treatment for people with hair loss. Show More Summary

Helsinki’s Akateeminen Kirjakauppa: the death of a bookstore

The big disappointment of this visit to Helsinki is the state of the Akateeminen Kirjakauppa (Academic Bookshop) located at Pohjoisesplanadi 39, Finland’s largest bookstore and a prominent feature of the city centre. The entire third...Show More Summary

'Sophie'

The unveiling back in early December of the world's most complete Stegosaurus skeleton at London's Natural History Museum won't have escaped many folks within the palaeo community. Naturally, as the UK contingent of LITC and being within...Show More Summary

Inherited gene variation helps explain drug toxicity in patients of East Asian ancestry

About 10 percent of young leukemia patients of East Asian ancestry inherit a gene variation that is associated with reduced tolerance of a drug that is indispensable for curing acute lymphoblastic leukemia, the most common childhood cancer, scientists report.

Dog disease in lions spread by multiple species

Canine distemper, a viral disease that's been infecting the famed lions of Tanzania's Serengeti National Park, appears to be spread by multiple animal species, according to a study published by a transcontinental team of scientists.

Unlocking the kidney riddle in newborns

Researchers are closer to understanding why babies born with smaller kidneys have a high risk of developing cardiovascular disease. Currently, renal disorders at birth affect about one in 500 babies. Many of these babies go on to lead healthy normal lives, however 20-40 per cent will develop chronic kidney disease and high blood pressure. Show More Summary

Fish catch break on world stage at global conference

Freshwater fish provide the food, sport and economic power across the globe. Inland fishing is often about individuals, families and small cooperatives. More than 60 million people in low-income nations are estimated to rely on inland fisheries for their livelihood. Show More Summary

Probiotic helps treat diabetes in rats, could lead to human remedy

Researchers have engineered a strain of lactobacillus, a human probiotic common in the gut, to secrete a Glucagen-like peptide (GPL-1). They then administered it orally to diabetic rats for 90 days and found the rats receiving the engineered probiotic had up to 30 percent lower high blood glucose, a hallmark of diabetes.

Music, Fiction, and the Value of Attention

The protagonist of Richard Powers’s 2014 novel, “Orfeo,” is a composer named Peter Els who, late in life, begins to dabble in biotechnology. Els’s attempts to “compose” in DNA turn him into a suspected bioterrorist fleeing across the country; one of his furtive stops is Champaign, Illinois, where he attended graduate school. Show More Summary

Bad weather warnings most effective if probability included, new research suggests

Risk researchers find that the public may respond best to severe weather warnings if they include a probability estimate, an important finding not only for the present but also for the longer-term future as climate change brings more frequent and severe threats.

Analysis rejects linkage between testosterone therapy, cardiovascular risk

Fears of a link between testosterone replacement therapy and cardiovascular risk are misplaced, according to a review. The therapy has come under widespread scrutiny in recent months, including by a federal Food and Drug Administration (FDA) panel convened last fall.

Died This Day: Adam Sedgwick

Adam Sedgwich (March 22, 1785 - January 27, 1873) was an English geologist who first applied the name Cambrian to the geologic period of time, now dated at 570 to 505 million years ago. In 1818 he became Woodwardian Professor of Geology...Show More Summary

Negative patient-doctor communication could worsen symptoms

A type of 'nocebo' response -- where patients perceive a lack of understanding or acceptance from their doctor -- could create anger and distress, physiological conditions that could worsen illness, a new research shows.

Salivary biomarkers predict oral feeding readiness in preterm newborns

Results from a new study hold the potential to substantially improve clinical decision-making to determine when a premature newborn is ready for oral feeding. The study describes developmental salivary biomarkers associated with feeding success in newborns, markers that could lead to development of objective assessment tools for caregivers.

Neuroscience researchers believe in quitting smoking gradually

The immediate reaction in the brain after quitting smoking has been the focus of a recent study. At just 12 hours after kicking the habit, the oxygen uptake and blood flow in the brain decrease significantly compared to never-smokers. This could explain why it is so difficult to say goodbye to nicotine once and for all, the researchers say.

Early Mesoamericans affected by climate change

Scientists have reconstructed the past climate for the region around Cantona, a large fortified city in highland Mexico, and found the population drastically declined in the past, at least in part because of climate change.

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