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Longevity-promoting superstar gets revealed in Caenorhabditis reproducibility project

(Buck Institute for Research on Aging) The amyloid dye Thioflavin T emerged as the superstar when age researchers in three independent laboratories tested ten already-promising pro-longevity chemicals across a range of distinctive strains and species of tiny nematode worms known as Caenorhabditis. Show More Summary

Researchers show that silicon can reproduce physical phenomena exploited by high-end telecommunications devices

The Semiconductor Industry Association has estimated that at current rates of increase, computers' energy requirements will exceed the world's total power output by 2040.

Enabling high-throughput image-based phenotyping

Nathan Miller, a scientist in the Spalding Lab at the University of Wisconsin–Madison's Department of Botany and Center for High Throughput Computing, works closely with CyVerse as he writes computer code to develop software programs that analyze images and videos of plants to determine plant phenotype, the measurable physical characteristics of plants.

Can the Chinese government really control the Internet? We found cracks in the Great Firewall.

The Great Firewall of China, the vast hardware and software system the Chinese government uses to prevent access to certain Internet content, is often depicted as monolithic and Orwellian. Our research uses new online analysis methods and reveals serious cracks. Although extensive, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) system of control over online social interaction is quite […]

Mystery eye disease is latest blow for Australia’s sick turtles

Green turtles on the Great Barrier Reef have developed a strange eye disease, which could be a result of a recent herpes outbreak or high levels of cobalt

Mystery eye disease is latest blow for Australia’s sick turtles

Green turtles on the Great Barrier Reef have developed a strange eye disease, which could be a result of a recent herpes outbreak or high levels of cobalt

The influence of CO2 enrichment on net photosynthesis of seagrass Zostera marina in a brackish water environment

Seagrasses are distributed across the globe and their communities may play key roles in the coastal ecosystems. Seagrass meadows are expected to benefit from the increased carbon availability which might be used in photosynthesis in a future high CO2 world. The main aim of this study was to examine the effect of elevated pCO2 on […]

The uronic acid content of coccolith-associated polysaccharides provides insight into coccolithogenesis and past climate

Unicellular phytoplanktonic algae (coccolithophores) are among the most prolific producers of calcium carbonate on the planet, with a production of ?1026 coccoliths per year. During their lith formation, coccolithophores mainly employ coccolith-associated polysaccharides (CAPs) for the regulation of crystal nucleation and growth. Show More Summary

‘Insane’ camera trap video captures rare battle in the Amazon

Without camera traps we would never be privy to two endangered species sparring in the remote Amazon rainforest. As darkness descended over the Peruvian Amazon in 2006, my wife and I listened spellbound while our guide told us the grisly...Show More Summary

Kennewick Man skeleton may be on its way back to ancestral home

The 9,000-year-old skeleton Native Americans call The Ancient One and scientists refer to as Kennewick Man may be headed back to his ancestral home very soon.

Florida wildlife officials encouraged by high manatee count

Florida wildlife officials are encouraged by the results of a recent survey that counted 6,620 manatees in the state.

Ocean acidification and warming: the economic toll

In a new study authored by Dr. John Talberth and Ernie Niemi of Natural Resource Economics, CSE reviewed the economic consequences of ocean acidification and warming – the two most prominent effects of climate change on our oceans – and estimated what increment to the existing social cost of carbon (SCC) needs to be made […]

The brightest, furthest pulsar in the Universe

ESA’s XMM-Newton has found a pulsar – the spinning remains of a once-massive star – that is a thousand times brighter than previously thought possible.

Chemists improve batteries for renewable energy storage

Because the sun doesn't always shine, solar utilities need a way to store extra charge for a rainy day. The same goes for wind power facilities, since the wind doesn't always blow. To take full advantage of renewable energy, electrical grids need large batteries that can store the power coming from wind and solar installations until it is needed. Show More Summary

Tuesday assorted links

1. Using models to deliver your illegal drugs. 2. Yes. 3. “Care and attention should be given to all victims of sexual violence, especially those who don’t want to think of themselves as victims.”  And more here. 4. New Rohan Silva bookshop in East London is modeled after a Borges short story. Show More Summary

Integrated regulatory and metabolic networks of the marine diatom Phaeodactylum tricornutum predict the response to rising CO2 levels

Diatoms are eukaryotic microalgae that are responsible for up to 40% of the ocean’s primary productivity. How diatoms respond to environmental perturbations such as elevated carbon concentrations in the atmosphere is currently poorly understood. Show More Summary

Transgender political candidates still likely face an uphill battle, study finds

New Hope, Texas, mayor Jess Herbst last month publicly came out as transgender, making her likely the first transgender elected official in the state.

Sperm whale’s skin comes off during mass ‘scratchathon’

A transparent chunk of skin got rubbed off during a short period when dozens of the animals gathered, apparently to socialise and groom each other

Sperm whale’s skin comes off during mass ‘scratchathon’

A transparent chunk of skin got rubbed off during a short period when dozens of the animals gathered, apparently to socialise and groom each other

Linking gene expression to productivity to unravel long- and short-term responses of seagrasses exposed to CO2 in volcanic vents

Ocean acidification is a major threat for marine life but seagrasses are expected to benefit from high CO2. In situ (long-term) and transplanted (short-term) plant incubations of the seagrass Cymodocea nodosa were performed near and away the influence of volcanic CO2 vents at Vulcano Island to test the hypothesis of beneficial effects of CO2 on […]

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