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For Success on Pinterest, Choose Your Colors Well

When it comes to Pinterest, colors matter. Researchers analyzed about 1 million posts on the site and found that images heavy on red, pink, or purple were repinned the most, reports Phys.org. By contrast, those with black, yellow, green, or blue fared the worst, according to the study in...

Life 'not as we know it' possible on Saturn's moon Titan?

Azotosome. Credit: Cornell University A new type of methane-based, oxygen-free life form that can metabolize and reproduce similar to life on Earth has been modeled by a team of Cornell University researchers. read more

For patients with brain tumors, insurance status linked to differences in patient safety and quality of care

There are already concerns that the Affordable Care Act will lead to class distinctions in who gets the best treatment and a new study on brain tumors will add fuel to the fire of that debate. Patients that are on Medicaid or uninsured...Show More Summary

Robust scientific evidence that chronic fatigue syndrome is a biological illness

Researchers at the Center for Infection and Immunity at Columbia University's Mailman School of Public Health identified distinct immune changes in patients diagnosed with chronic fatigue syndrome, known medically as myalgic encephalomyelitis (ME/CFS) or systemic exertion intolerance disease. Show More Summary

Anti-stroke drugs, minus the side effects

In the 1990s, neuroscientists identified a class of drugs that showed promise in the area of stroke. NMDA receptor antagonists could limit damage to the brain in animal models of stroke. But one problem complicated testing the drugsShow More Summary

Local media coverage positive toward local businesses

When local news media report about hometown companies, they use fewer negative words than when reporting about nonlocal companies, according to research by business experts at Rice University and the University of Texas at Dallas. read more

Drug research, development more efficient than expected

Despite ever increasing regulation in drug approval and the rising costs of research, drug research and development remains unexpectedly efficient, a new shows. To investigate the efficiency in the development of new drugs, the researchers analyzed a data set consisting of new drugs approved by the FDA. Show More Summary

Employees become angry when receiving after-hours email, texts

People who receive electronic correspondence from work after hours become angry more often than not and that can interfere with their personal lives, a new study from a management researcher shows.

How were fossil tracks made by Early Triassic swimming reptiles so well preserved?

That swim tracks made by tetrapods occur in high numbers in deposits from the Early Triassic is well known. What is less clear is why the tracks are so abundant and well preserved. Paleontologists have now determined that a unique combination...Show More Summary

Enhancing studies on a possible blood biomarker for traumatic brain injury

New technology could help advance blood biomarker capabilities for improved diagnosis, treatment and prognosis of traumatic brain injury (TBI). An estimated 1.7 million Americans suffer a traumatic brain injury each year, and an estimated 5.3 million individuals -- approximately two percent of the U.S. Show More Summary

Growth signal can influence cancer cells' vulnerability to drugs, study suggests

In theory, a tumor is an army of clones, made up of many copies of the original cancerous cell. But tumor cells don't always act like duplicates, and their unpredictable behavior can create problems for treatment. For while some cells within a tumor succumb to anti-cancer drugs, others may survive to bring the cancer back to life once therapy has ended.

Anderson algorithm increases surgical success with advanced ovarian cancer

A surgical algorithm developed and implemented by ovarian cancer specialists dramatically increases the frequency of complete removal of all visible tumor – a milestone strongly tied to improved survival. The algorithm is a framework...Show More Summary

What Color Is This Dress? It’s An Optical Illusion

This is pretty amazing – almost as much for how quickly this has gone viral as for the effect itself. There is now an intense debate going on in the intertubes over whether this dress is black and blue or white and gold. Take a look and decide for yourself. Buzzfeed has a poll which currently [...]

Liberals and Conservatives Both Resist Science, But Differently

There have been a number of studies looking at how ideological belief influence attitudes toward science. It is no surprise that in general people, of whatever ideological bent, engage in motivated reasoning to deny science that appears to contradict their religious or political beliefs. There are different views, however, regarding whether or not the two [...]

High stress for new mothers increases secondhand smoke risk for infants

Mothers with a high level of prenatal social stressors -- including possibly less control over their own housing situation or economic distress -- had 2.5 times higher odds to have only a partial or no restriction on smoking in their home than those with no stressors, which increases secondhand smoke risk, a study has found.

Untangling DNA with a droplet of water, a pipet and a polymer

Researchers have long sought an efficient way to untangle DNA to study its structure -- neatly unraveled and straightened out -- under a microscope. Now, researchers have devised a simple and effective solution: they inject genetic material into a droplet of water and use a pipet tip to drag it over a glass plate covered with a sticky polymer.

New breast cancer test links immune 'hotspots' to better survival

Scientists have developed a new test that can predict the survival chances of women with breast cancer by analyzing images of 'hotspots' where there has been a fierce immune reaction to a tumor. Researchers used statistical softwareShow More Summary

Transient details of HIV genome packaging captured

Once HIV-1 has hijacked a host cell to make copies of its own RNA genome and viral proteins, it must assemble these components into new virus particles. The orchestration of this intricate assembly process falls to a viral protein known as Gag. Show More Summary

Left or right? The brain knows before you move

A neural circuit that connects motor planning to movement has been identified by researchers. The study, the researchers say, explains why injuries that disrupt the brain's ability to carry out movement planning typically impair a person's ability to make movements on just one side of his or her body.

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