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Searching for the A boson with CMS

I am quite happy to report today that the CMS experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider has just published a new search which fills a gap in studies of extended Higgs boson sectors. It is a search for the decay of the A boson into Zh pairs, where the Z in turn decays to […]

Luncheon Reflections

13 hours agoAcademics / Physics : Asymptotia

You know, I never got around to mentioning here that I am now Director (co-directing with Louise Steinman who runs the ALOUD series) of the Los Angeles Institute for the Humanities (LAIH), a wonderful organisation that I have mentioned here before. Show More Summary

PNAS: Fran Poodry, Educational Technology Specialist

I’ve decided to do a new round of profiles in the Project for Non-Academic Science (acronym deliberately chosen to coincide with a journal), as a way of getting a little more information out there to students studying in STEM fields who will likely end up with jobs off the “standard” academic science track. Third in…

A Breakthrough Donation for Computer Science

Lance Fortnow has a post summarizing some of the news affecting the CS community over the past month, including updates on various prizes as well as the significant media attention focusing on physics- and math-related topics such as movies about Turing and … Continue reading ?

CERN frees LHC data

Anyone can access collision data from the Large Hadron Collider through the new CERN Open Data Portal. Today CERN launched its Open Data Portal, which makes data from real collision events produced by LHC experiments available to the...Show More Summary

PNAS: Bob Cross, Naval Computer Scientist

I’ve decided to do a new round of profiles in the Project for Non-Academic Science (acronym deliberately chosen to coincide with a journal), as a way of getting a little more information out there to students studying in STEM fields who will likely end up with jobs off the “standard” academic science track. Second in…

On Replacing Science Online

That’s “Science Online” as in the conference that folded, not “science, online” as in the practice of trying to understand the universe from in front of a networked computer. Specifically, I’m posting about David Zaslavsky’s call for help in putting together a replacement meeting. There was a lot of talk about this right when Science…

Update on the bananas

One of the most interesting physics stories of this year was the discovery of an unidentified 3.5 keV x-ray emission line from galactic clusters. This so-called bulbulon can be interpreted as a signal of sterile neutrino dark matter decaying into an active neutrino and a photon. Show More Summary

The Imitation Game

This season’s Hollywood math/physics extravangza is starting to come to an end. For coverage of the Breakthrough Prize ceremony, I enthusiastically recommend Michael Harris’s new piece at Slate which just appeared. The final high profile production, one promoted at the … Continue reading ?

That’s a Higgs but how many?

CMS and ATLAS collaborations are yet up to work producing results from the datasets obtained in the first phase of activity of LHC. The restart is really near the corner and, maybe already the next summer, things can change considerably. Anyway what they get from the old data can be really promising and rather intriguing. […]

Chalkboards Everywhere!

I love chalkboards (or blackboards if you prefer). I love showing up to give a talk somewhere and just picking up the chalk and going for it. No heavily over-packed slides full of too many fast moving things, as happens too much these days. Show More Summary

PNAS: W. F., Patent Lawyer

I’ve decided to do a new round of profiles in the Project for Non-Academic Science (acronym deliberately chosen to coincide with a journal), as a way of getting a little more information out there to students studying in STEM fields who will likely end up with jobs off the “standard” academic science track. First up…

LHCb experiment finds new particles

A new LHCb result adds two new composite particles to the quark model. Today the LHCb experiment at CERN’s Large Hadron Collider announced the discovery of two new particles, each consisting of three quarks. The particles, known as the Xi_b'- and Xi_b-, were predicted to exist by the quark model but had never been observed. Show More Summary

Auger reveals subtlety in cosmic rays

Scientists home in on the make-up of cosmic rays, which are more nuanced than previously thought. Unlike the twinkling little star of nursery rhyme, the cosmic ray is not the subject of any well-known song about an astronomical wonder. Show More Summary

Planck News?

The timing for release of long-awaited Planck polarization data keeps getting pushed back. At one point it was supposed to be earlier this year, most recently it was supposed to be this month, with that timing forced by a conference … Continue reading ?

Advertisements for the Multiverse

After watching the Breakthrough Prize awards tonight, tomorrow night on the Science Channel you can watch a program that actually features physicists rather than Hollywood/Silicon Valley celebrities. There’s an hour long infomercial for the Multiverse, entitled “Which Universe Are We … Continue reading ?

Breakthrough Prize on TV

You can watch the recent Breakthrough Prize awards ceremony on TV tonight, 6 pm on the Science and Discovery channels. The Science Channel has a site with videos of highlights of the evening, the complete list of which is: Christina … Continue reading ?

High Precision, Not High Energy: Video

Back in August, I gave a talk in Stockholm at the Nordita workshop for science writers, about precision measurement searches for physics beyond the Standard Model. There’s now video of this online: The video quality isn’t great, but if you’d like a clearer look at the slides, I’ve posted them on SlideShare. The talk was…

Return of the Revenge of the Project for Non-Academic Science

I’ve been doing a lot of darkness-cursing lately (mostly off-line), so we could stand to have a little candle-lighting. It’s been a few years since I last did a round of profiles of scientists outside academia, so let’s see if that will fly again… So, if you 1) Have a degree in a STEM field…

Eureka: Bridge to Dark Matter

The first time you hear about dark matter, it sounds kind of crazy– asserting that we’re surrounded by tons of invisible stuff is usually a good way to get locked up. But the process of its discovery is surprisingly ordinary: it’s just what you do when you play cards. Here’s the second green-screen video I’ve…

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