All Blogs / Academics / Physics / New


Theoretical discovery of transparent particles that break the previously accepted limit of visibility

Transparent particles with extraordinarily high refractive indices can become almost invisible at wavelengths longer than the particle size, an ASTAR-led theoretical study has shown. The discovery challenges the accepted wisdom around the limits of light scattering and visibility, and could lead to a new class of 'invisible' materials.

Fifty years of stories

To celebrate a half-century of discovery, Fermilab has been gathering tales of life at the lab.

New technique promises tunable laser devices

Whispering gallery mode (WGM) resonators are used to make tiny micro-lasers, sensors, switches, routers and other devices. These tiny structures rely on a phenomenon similar to an effect observed in circular galleries, such as in some...Show More Summary

50 years of stories

To celebrate a half-century of discovery, Fermilab has been gathering tales of life at the lab. Science stories usually catch the eye when there’s big news: the discovery of gravitational waves, the appearance of a new particle. ButShow More Summary

One-way track for microwaves based on mechanical interference

Devices that allow to route microwave signals are essential engineering tools. In particular, isolators, which let signals flow in one direction but block them in the other, are needed to protect sensitive equipment from harm. Now, scientists...Show More Summary

Researchers develop a rapid, automatable, chip-based platform to analyze live cells

Fluorescence microscopy gives researchers incredible power to illuminate the tiniest structures and capture the real-time activities of live cells by tagging biological molecules with a veritable rainbow of fluorescent dyes. This power comes at a cost: The technology can be expensive and time-consuming and, so far, has resisted attempts at automation.

Synopsis: The Softness of an Atom’s Touch

Two spectroscopic probes are combined to measure the “softness” of collisions between cold atoms. [Physics] Published Tue Sep 19, 2017

Nonlinear physics bridges thoughts to sounds in birdsong

The beautiful sound of birdsongs emerging from the trees is a wonderful example of how much nature can still teach us, even as much about their origins are still mysterious to us. About 40 percent of bird species learn to vocalize when they are exposed to a tutor, a behavior of interest to many neurologists and neurobiologists. Show More Summary

Cost effective quantum moves a step closer

Canadian and US researchers have taken an important step towards enabling quantum networks to be cost-effective and truly secure from attack.

BRSG Christmas Meeting

Lecture/talk: 13 Dec 2017, United Kingdom.

Speed plus control in new computer chip—slowing down light to sound

Light travels fast – sometimes a little too fast when it comes to data processing.

Physicists develop new design for fast, single-photon guns

Researchers from the Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology and the University of Siegen have explained the mechanism of single-photon generation in diamond diodes. Their findings, published in Physical Review Applied, offer new avenues for the development of high-speed single-photon sources for quantum communication networks and quantum computers of the future.

How to make half-metals that contain no metals

Calculations predict new type of material for spintronics

Optical and electrical bistability study sheds light on next-gen high speed data transfer

Today, electrical bistable devices are the foundation of digital electronics, serving as building blocks of switches, logic gates and memories in computer systems. However, the bandwidth of these electronic computers is limited by the signal delay of time constants important to electronic logic operations. Show More Summary

New approach boosts performance in thermoelectric materials

Thermoelectric materials are considered a key resource for the future - able to produce electricity from sources of heat that would otherwise go to waste, from power plants, vehicle tailpipes and elsewhere, without generating additional greenhouse gases. Show More Summary

Viewpoint: Hydrogen Hides Surprises at High Pressure

Author(s): Peter M. Celliers and Jon H. Eggert Measurements of the melting curve of hydrogen at unprecedentedly high pressures call for a refinement of the theories describing the material. [Physics 10, 101] Published Mon Sep 18, 20...

A new approach to ultrafast light pulses

Two-dimensional materials called molecular aggregates are very effective light emitters that work on a different principle than typical organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) or quantum dots. But their potential as components for new kinds of optoelectronic devices has been limited by their relatively slow response time. Show More Summary

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC