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Synopsis: Quantum Sensing of Magnetic Fields

A new design for an atomic magnetometer utilizes so-called quantum nondemolition measurements to detect very weak magnetic-field signals. [Physics] Published Tue Jul 25, 2017

Researchers demonstrate new way to produce high-density clusters of aligned quantum sensors in diamond

Imagine a sensor so sensitive it can detect changes in the proton concentration of a single protein, within a single cell. This level of insight would reveal elusive quantum-scale dynamics of that protein's function, potentially even in real time, but demands a sensor with controllable features at a similar scale.

A bar magnet creates chaos in plasma

Placing a magnet on your refrigerator might hold up your calendar, but researchers from India's Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics found that placing one outside a plasma chamber causes a localized, fireball-like structure. This work may help understand plasma dynamics under these north-south, or dipolar, magnetic fields. Show More Summary

Sophisticated medical imaging technique proves useful for automotive industry

Many of today's cars are coated with paint that exhibits a metallic or glittery shine. The exact sparkle and color you see is determined by the distribution and characteristics of tiny metal flakes used in the paint. A new approach based...Show More Summary

Team develops new math equation to predict cavitation

A popular backyard science experiment led a team of fluid dynamics experts to a new math formula that more accurately predicts cavitation and its damaging effects.

Energy-harvesting bracelet could power wearable electronics

(Phys.org)—Researchers have designed a bracelet that harvests biomechanical energy from the wearer's wrist movements, which can then be converted into electricity and used to extend the battery lifetime of personal electronics or even fully power some of these devices.

New chromium-based superconductor has an unusual electronic state

When certain materials are cooled below a critical temperature they become superconductors, with zero electrical resistance. An international research team observed an unusual electronic state in new superconductor chromium arsenide. This finding could prove useful in future superconductor research and material design. The study was published on June 5 in Nature Communications.

'Tiny dancer' atoms could prove a hit with quantum computer scientists

Quantum computers could be a step closer to practical use thanks to the work of an international team led by University of Surrey scientists. The group, led by Dr Steve Chick and Professor of Physics Ben Murdin, has developed a way of making phosphorous atoms 'dance', which could be the next breakthrough in the quest to make quantum computers a viable reality.

New magnetic topological semimetal for more efficient electronics

A recent discovery by a team of researchers led by Tulane University advances fundamental knowledge that could one day lead to more energy-efficient computers, televisions, cellphones and other electronics.

Researchers uncover new avenues for finding unique class of insulators

For the last decade, scientists have sought topological insulators, materials that are insulating on the inside but conduct current on their surfaces. Although first predicted around 2005, very few real-world examples have been found to date. Show More Summary

Magnetic quantum objects in a 'nano egg carton'

Magnetic quantum objects in superconductors, so-called "fluxons," are particularly suitable for the storage and processing of data bits. Computer circuits based on fluxons could be operated with significantly higher speed while dissipating much less heat. Show More Summary

Can four neutrons form a stable nucleus?

Flash Physics: need-to-know updates from the world of physics

Researchers perform first basic-physics simulation of the impact of recycled atoms on plasma turbulence

Turbulence, the violently unruly disturbance of plasma, can prevent plasma from growing hot enough to fuel fusion reactions. Long a puzzling concern of researchers has been the impact on turbulence of atoms recycled from the walls of tokamaks that confine the plasma. Show More Summary

Viewpoint: Spinning Black Holes May Grow Hair

Author(s): Sam Dolan A spinning black hole may lose up to 9% of its mass by spontaneously growing “hair” in the form of excitations of a hypothetical particle field with a tiny mass. [Physics 10, 83] Published Mon Jul 24, 2017

Elastic Leidenfrost effect enables soft engines

Water droplets float in a hot pan because of the so-called Leidenfrost effect. Now, physicists have discovered a variation: the elastic Leidenfrost effect. It explains why hydrogel balls jump around on a hot plate making high-pitched sounds. They have published the results of their study in Nature Physics.

Scientists announce the quest for high-index materials

An antenna is a device capable of effectively transmitting, picking up, and redirecting electromagnetic radiation. Typically, antennas are macroscopic devices operating in the radio and microwave range. However, there are similar optical devices (Fig. Show More Summary

Physics of bubbles could explain language patterns

Language patterns could be predicted by simple laws of physics, a new study has found.

Observing fracture in stressed materials

Ever wondered, while cruising at 36,000 feet over the Atlantic, what would happen if a piece of satellite, asteroid, or other debris collided with your aircraft?

Turbulence in planetary cores excited by tides

Veritable shields against high-energy particles, planets' magnetic fields are produced by iron moving in their liquid core. Yet the dominant model for explaining this system does not fit the smallest celestial bodies. Researchers atShow More Summary

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