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Ghostbusters

Last night I went to a preview screening of the new Ghostbusters film. This isn’t a review, all I’ll say is that if you liked the first one, you’d probably like this one too. In the first film, an early … Continue reading ?

A primer on particle accelerators

What’s the difference between a synchrotron and a cyclotron, anyway? Research in high-energy physics takes many forms. But most experiments in the field rely on accelerators that create and speed up particles on demand. What followsShow More Summary

Physics and Math News

Now back from vacation, here’s the latest on revolutionary developments in physics and mathematics: On the high energy physics front, the good news is that the LHC is performing remarkably well, with already over 13 inverse fb of luminosity, far … Continue reading ?

Physics Week in Review: July 9, 2016

Among this week's physics highlights: NASA's Juno mission is now successfully in orbit around Jupiter! Also, the last thing Japan's doomed Hitomi satellite saw before it died, and astronomers' first look at a rare triple-star system. Me at Gizmodo: This...

Kill your Darlings…

(Apparently I spent a lot of time cross-hatching, back in 2010-2012? More on this below. click for larger view.) I've changed locations, have several physics research tasks to work on, and so my usual work flow is not going to be appropriate for the next couple of weeks, so I thought I'd work on a different aspect of the book project. Show More Summary

Gauge Theories are Cool

That is all. ('fraid you'll have to wait for the finished book to learn why those shapes are relevant to the title...) -cvj Click to continue reading this post ? The post Gauge Theories are Cool appeared first on Asymptotia.

Scientists salvage insights from lost satellite

Before Hitomi died, it sent X-ray data that could explain why galaxy clusters form far fewer stars than expected. Working with information sent from the Japanese Hitomi satellite, an international team of researchers has obtained the first views of a supermassive black hole stirring hot gas at the heart of a galaxy cluster. Show More Summary

ITCS’2017: Special Guest Post by Christos Papadimitriou

The wait is over. Yes, that’s correct: the Call for Papers for the 2017 Innovations in Theoretical Computer Science (ITCS) conference, to be held in Berkeley this coming January 9-11, is finally up.  I attended ITCS’2015 in Rehovot, Israel and had a blast, and will attend ITCS’2017 if logistics permit. But that’s not all: in a […]

Incredible hulking facts about gamma rays

From lightning to the death of electrons, the highest-energy form of light is everywhere. Gamma rays are the most energetic type of light, packing a punch strong enough to pierce through metal or concrete barriers. More energetic than...Show More Summary

Why Physicists Disparage Philosophers, In Three Paragraphs

Periodically, some scientific celebrity from the physical sciences– Neil deGrasse Tyson or Stephen Hawking, say– will say something dismissive about philosophy, and kick off a big rush of articles about how dumb their remarks are, how important philosophy is, and so on. Given that this happens on a regular basis, you might wonder why it…

300-305/366: Peregrination

A while back, I went down to Vroman’s Nose in Middleburgh to go for a hike, and found a sign saying that peregrine falcons are known to nest on the cliffs. Since the peregrine falcon is SteelyKid’s absolute favorite bird, and the subject of her school research project, this seemed like a good location for…

“Did Einstein Kill Schrödinger’s Cat? A Quantum State of Mind”

No, I didn’t invent that title.  And no, I don’t know of any interesting sense in which “Einstein killed Schrödinger’s cat,” though arguably there are senses in which Schrödinger’s cat killed Einstein. The above was, however, the title given to a fun panel discussion that Daniel Harlow, Brian Swingle, and I participated in on Wednesday evening, at […]

Physics Week in Review: July 2, 2016

It's Fourth of July weekend, and sure, you're all out enjoying the long holiday, but there was also lots of cool physics stuff that happened this week. Among the highlights: everyone's eagerly awaiting the Juno spacecraft's orbital insertion maneuver this...

Short Items

Erica Klarreich at Quanta magazine has a wonderful profile of Peter Scholze. Scholze has been busy revolutionizing various parts of arithmetic geometry in recent years, and the article does a good job of giving some of the flavor of this. … Continue reading ?

LHCb discovers family of tetraquarks

Researchers found four new particles made of the same four building blocks. It’s quadruplets! Syracuse University researchers on the LHCb experiment confirmed the existence of a new four-quark particle and serendipitously discovered three of its siblings. Quarks are the solid scaffolding inside composite particles like protons and neutrons. Show More Summary

Instagram Culture and the Democratization of Pretension

When I was going through the huge collection of photos I have from the Forum in Rome, I kept running across pictures containing two young Asian women (neither of them Kate). This isn’t because I was stalking them, but because they were everywhere, stopping for long periods in front of virtually every significant ruin and…

Matter, energy… knowledge: How to harness physics’ demonic power

Running a brain-twisting thought experiment for real shows that information is a physical thing – so can we now harness the most elusive entity in the cosmos?

Preparing for their magnetic moment

Scientists are using a plastic robot and hair-thin pieces of metal to ready a magnet that will hunt for new physics. Three summers ago, a team of scientists and engineers on the Muon g-2 experiment moved a 52-foot-wide circular magnet 3200 miles over land and sea. Show More Summary

That’s odd: Unruly penguins hint where all the antimatter went

Rare “penguin” particle decays should all happen at the same rate. They don’t – perhaps providing a clue to why we live in a universe made of matter

Past, present, future: How do we deal with time?

How do we shape the past? Or the future? Is boredom in the present good for us? Two new books take on the complexities of how we experience time

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