All Blogs / Academics / Physics / Popular


Plutonium keeps its electrons close to home

Found in nuclear fuel and nuclear weapons, plutonium is an incredibly complex element that has far-ranging energy, security, and environmental effects. To understand plutonium, scientists at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory andShow More Summary

Simple math, antimatter, and the birth of the Universe

If x2 = 4, then what is x? Did you just think "2"? Is that correct? Well, yes and no. The fact that there is a parallel but equally valid answer that x is negative 2 has been a difficult and intriguing conundrum to everyone who comes across it. Show More Summary

The risks and rewards of radiation

Timothy Jorgensen’s book greatly contributes to removing the mystery and misunderstanding that surrounds radiation, writes reviewer Jun Deng

A tight squeeze for electrons – quantum effects observed in 'one-dimensional' wires

Researchers have observed quantum effects in electrons by squeezing them into one-dimensional 'quantum wires' and observing the interactions between them. The results could be used to aid in the development of quantum technologies, including quantum computing.

Improved microendoscope brings cervical cancer into focus

Rice University researchers have added a clever spin—a rotating grating that removes out-of-focus light—to a cutting-edge, minimally invasive fiber-optic microscope that lets oncologists and surgeons zoom in on cancer tumors prior to surgery.

Fighting science denial

Robert P Crease on how to fight “science denial” in light of the upcoming US election

Magnetic polaron imaged for the first time

Researchers at Aalto University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory have demonstrated that polaron formation also occurs in a system of magnetic charges, and not just in a system of electric charges. Being able to control the transport properties of such charges could enable new devices based on magnetic rather than electric charges, for example computer memories.

Why should scientists communicate their work to the public?

Quantum physicist Andrea Morello on the responsibility of scientists to share the findings of their research

Inspecting the Higgs with a golden probe

Hello particle nibblers, After recovering from a dead-diphoton-excess induced depression (see here, here, and here for summaries) I am back to tell you a little more about something that actually does exist, our old friend Monsieur Higgs boson. All of the fuss over the past few months over a potential new particle at 750 GeV […]

New optofluidic platform features tunable optics and novel 'lightvalves'

For well over a decade, electrical engineer Holger Schmidt has been developing devices for optical analysis of samples on integrated chip-based platforms, with applications in areas such as biological sensors, virus detection, and chemical analysis. Show More Summary

Only Canadian-led experiment at Large Hadron Collider gets first results

While Canadians were winning medals at the Olympics in Rio de Janiero this summer, MoEDAL (pronounced "medal"), the only Canadian-led experiment at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Geneva, celebrated its first published results.

Tame your Oobleck: Researcher able to control thickening

Shear thickening – the increase of a liquid's viscosity through applied force – is a well-known phenomenon. Mix equal parts corn starch and water and you come up with "Oobleck," a liquid that turns solid the more vigorously you stir...

Synopsis: Spotting Dark Matter with Supermaterials

Superconducting aluminum or superfluid helium could be used to detect superlight dark matter particles. [Physics] Published Wed Sep 14, 2016

Complex materials can self-organize into circuits, may form basis for multifunction chips

Researchers studying the behavior of nanoscale materials at the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory have uncovered remarkable behavior that could advance microprocessors beyond today's silicon-based chips.

Diffraction-controlled laser-driven proton acceleration

A targeted way to manipulate beams of protons accelerated using ultrashort and ultraintense laser pulses has been demonstrated by a team of researchers led at the University of Strathclyde.

The hunt for the truest north

Many theories predict the existence of magnetic monopoles, but experiments have yet to see them. If you chop a magnet in half, you end up with two smaller magnets. Both the original and the new magnets have “north” and “south” poles.  But...Show More Summary

Copyright © 2015 Regator, LLC